GermanEnglish

Text by Alexander Koch

A virtually bare exhibition space without its own lighting and without a discernable function. Hard to say that something is actually being »presented» there. We briefly notice two illuminated plastic tubs and move on to the next room. A second later my colleague Nikolaus says: »Something didn’t feel right in there.« So we go back. The feeling Nikolaus mentioned came from an atmospheric ground zero, as if someone had pulled the plug and shut down all the vital functions of the place. And the few things we could make out seemed to have scampered off into the margins of the space, keeping all to themselves. After looking at them more closely for awhile, a thought came to us that still stays with us today: »Here someone is presenting America’s wounded soul at the beginning of the twenty-first century«—the pain and the broken pride of a society that so fervently suppresses its own inhumanity. It is 2008 and we are at Yale, at the MFA thesis exhibition for students of Jessica Stockholder, who introduces us that afternoon to the room’s creator: Michael E. Smith.

In a corner of the exhibition room, one of the two plastic tubs rested on the floor, filled with a hand’s width of greenish water. In the tub, two used tennis socks were crisscrossed, each open end pointing outward in a different direction. A lamp was clamped to the tub’s edge overlooking the frugal aquarium, its light and warmth aimed downward into the cloudy algal bloom, where the pair of socks cowered like motionless fish. Close by, a crystal ball was positioned on top of a radiator. It gathered up the residual traces of light, focusing them into a small, bright point on the wall. No clairvoyance or future here, just a beam of reflected light. On the other side of the room, a radio had tethered itself to a humidifier with its own power cord. Overhead, on the ceiling, a glass cover was missing from a light, and instead of the light bulb, which belonged there, the head of a toothbrush with a burned handle tip was jammed into the socket threads. A soft-drink vending machine hummed quietly in the adjacent room.

Like each of his later exhibitions, this early installation at Yale University was also underpinned by the oppressively silent presence of simple objects, which can barely be spoken about other than in an animistic language, one ascribing them emotions, demeanor, and even a fate: they seem to be hurting, to be cold, are wounded or seek protection, lie alone in the emptiness, or cling to a part of the architecture. Sometimes they prop each other up, lean on or envelope one another, save themselves by crawling under a piece of furniture, or hang unnoticed from the ceiling. Frequently, their surfaces show the literal traces of abuse they were subjected to in the studio. They are scarred and encrusted, sealed off with resins and lacquer, or stuck together with industrial foam. Most are the size of torsos and limbs, or resemble a head in size. Their relationship to the human body is ever-present, and yet they remain among themselves in a world of objects where humans do not feature at all. And if they do, then as a threat.

Michael E. Smith’s work has its roots in Detroit. The birthplace of Fordism once embodied the achievements of the New Deal, promising wageworkers social security and sufficient affluence to partake in consumerist society and enjoy the benefits of progress. Yet the boomtown of the automobile industry overstepped its »limits to growth« long before the 1972 similarly named study by the Club of Rome presaged the future shrinking of the developed world’s economic centers. It was the first major US city to completely collapse after the affluent, mostly white segment of the population pulled its wealth out of the hapless city. The urban and social destruction that followed was unprecedented—it proved however to be only the first example of the disintegration of a community that, having plummeted from the heady heights of its own promises of progress, comes up with nothing better than abandoning broad sections of the populace to the debris of Modernity. Detroit is the first large-scale ruin of prosperity.

Untitled, 2010: Smith has used a telephone cord to construct a bowl similar to those found in ethnological collections, except of course that there it would be made out of a layered spiral of rolled-out clay. Serving as a handle and giving the bowl the look and feel of a pan, is the broken end of a neon tube, shored up with gaffe’s tape. Long-distance communication has been broken off and the light is out—also at the 2010 exhibition at KOW where the bowl appeared. But there is probably nothing more elemental and crucial than a vessel used for drinking or a pan for cooking food. An object, in essence as ancient as one of mankind’s very first arts, namely to produce things to meet practical daily needs, but here recycled backwards as it were, tinkered together out of electrical elements which, not only in Detroit but in many other places around the world, have absolutely no purpose should the power grid be down.

Smith makes use of objects, the vestiges of bygone prosperity, which are found in the niches of a frugal life: discarded clothing items like socks, T-shirts, and hats, household items like bottles and dishes, parts of technical devices or animal cadavers; things readily available in the artist’s surrounds, that had previously met basic human needs of food, warmth, and physical well-being, or served to keep our technology-dependent daily routines up and running. Smith uses them for an art that refrains from adding to what is given. Instead, he transforms his material into a state that still reverberates with the pain and anguish of an existence whose physical and emotional foundations have been destroyed. In 2010 and 2013, he placed in KOW’s upper space three works whose proportions corresponded to a head, a torso, and an arm—parts of a body scattered widely about, their fragments rigidly arranged to the architectural axes of the room. One object consisted of three baseball caps, which were fitted together like a broken paddle wheel, resulting in a portrait bust suffocated under yellow tape.

Smith’s objects seem like physical reconstructions of emotional vulnerability and disfigurement, his exhibitions like an archeology of humanity. They are created from a modest stock of selected and, when needed, prepared materials, which only take their final form on site and insert themselves into particular situations. Material images which have formed an independent strand in Smith’s oeuvre from the very outset appear like scorched, ashen, or scarred skin. Smith takes a similar approach in his videos: Jellyfish, 2011, is a fixed view shot of the leathery-scaly body of a pale pink fish, whose aquarium is so small it only has room to move in place. Miles, 2007, loops a seconds-long film sequence from a concert recording of Miles Davis, whose perspiration-drenched, frizzy hair takes on the form of brain matter in the spotlight. Photographs taken by Smith in Detroit in 2008 present ruinous, partially burned-out, partially collapsing residential houses in the dark of night like hulking, silent cadavers shrinking back from the flash of the camera.

Suffocation, marking time, being at one’s mercy, or succumbing to one’s injuries—this appears at first view to be what this young oeuvre is documenting, presented deathly still before the viewer, lying mostly on the floor. So I was initially surprised— but ultimately it struck me as completely plausible—when Smith made reference to Joseph Beuys during one of our conversations. Beuys’s idea of an art, that would potentially be capable of purifying and healing the body social, seemed to be one of the basic impulses underlying Smith’s work, and offered him a progressive, even solidary perspective, that came unexpected for me. But Smith avoided becoming fettered to Beuys’s symbolism, transferring instead the approach of a convalescent semantics onto the ruinous physique of his objects. With his installation Zeige deine Wunde (Show Your Wound) (1974–75), Beuys had explicitly pointed out that »you must reveal the illness you want to heal,« and hoped, with regard to societal traumas, that his art »provides a way out, if you listen to it carefully.« (Süddeutsche Zeitung from January 26–27, 1980)

An early key work from 2008 demonstrates Smith’s take on this. He sawed apart a small plastic Buddha statue, discarded the figure’s torso, reattaching the head to the body so that it looks like the bulbous nose on the face of a fish head, whose gaping mouth recalls a catfish. Buddha’s hands were lopped off in order to indicate the fish eyes. His facial features have been cut smooth so that the contours of his skull protrude forward much like in computed tomography. Now the catfish is just that not-so-attractive water inhabitant that devours everything in front of its mouth at the muddy bottom, living or dead. That makes it unpalatable but adaptive. Smith dismantles a symbol of higher consciousness and spiritual cleansing—a demarcation from Beuys’s metaphysics—in order to put in its place the image of an unselective organism living close to the dirty sediments of an ecosystem and filtering out what it needs to survive.

The things in and with which we live are more than mere accessories of the self. Especially when they safeguard our survival, they are our existence. At a time when Western societies have surpassed the limits of their growth and have had to switch from expansion to self-preservation, Smith contrasts this era’s environmental and ecological disasters with a materialism of basic needs. Yet his art pointedly refuses to align itself with ascetic ideals proclaiming that »less is more.« Modest lifestyles have long started to spread against the will of those who adopt them, and upward economic redistribution is teaching the middle classes the fear of social decline. For many people, »less« means a bare-bones life, and Smith’s objects trace that threshold of pain in lieu of a body politic that has become deaf to its own needs. They »do« or »experience« what we happily ignore, but what is so familiar to our emotional experience and our physical and spatial perception that the alienation between subject and object melts away and we come so near to the condition of an everyday thing that it awakens our empathy.

Untitled, 2013: A wasps’ nest is lying on the floor, physically fragile and with an opening on one side. The abandoned dwelling of an entire community. On top, with the same external dimensions, a hooded sweatshirt is folded into itself. Like a buffer it protects and warms the empty nest and, it would seem, itself as well. Viewed in the context of the room’s installation, at KOW in 2013, the sweatshirt looks forlornly toward a large bowl a few steps away, over which a T-shirt has been pulled like over the stomach of an overweight teenager. In fact the bowl comes from a bakery and was used for mixing dough. The title of the work, Fat Albert, 2013, quotes a popular cartoon character, as Smith frequently does, in this case a corpulent adolescent. With droopy, empty sleeves, the rounded torso seems to be rowing forward in vain, stuck in place like a tautly stretched drum for beating. Further away is an arm-length, folded pillowcase, whose open, imploring hand is a scoop once used to pass out animal feed.

Dave, 2013: Two shells facing one another are resting on the floor. Pinned between them is a dead pigeon, half pulled voraciously inside the shells, half pensively caught in the middle of an existential fight for life, in which the bird extends a wing upward. Present once again is the protective housing that runs throughout Smith’s work. Lying by itself in the expansive spaces of the Ludwig Forum Aachen, the pair of shells forms a small, outwardly protective, closed-off entity by turning their open and vulnerable sides toward one another. Of course, the pair is also just an empty shell, and, when counting the pigeon cadaver, three dead beings are joined together here. Nevertheless, they stand together like a small community in a hostile environment. Dave, the title, refers to Dave Thomas, the popular founder of the Wendy’s hamburger chain, one of the junk food enterprises that does not increase lifespan in the US. Given that the meat patties of hamburgers are pinned between two buns like the pigeon between the shells, the work and the title are rife with synonymous implications.

Here, as in other works, the powerful influence of Surrealism in the US can still be felt. But what differentiates Smith’s combinations of objects and materials from, for instance, Meret Oppenheim’s famous 1936 fur lined teacup, is that the tremendous unlikelihood of their encounter appears so plausible and that their occasional beguiling poetry is not rooted in fantasy but in a pragmatic sense for survival. For our consumer and throwaway mentalities this alone would be no small shift in perspective. But Smith goes further: he shows the wounds of a culture whose members neither deal with themselves rationally nor with others—not to mention their environment—and increasingly live in the devastation they themselves have caused. If one listens carefully, to continue with Beuys, Smith’s work displays an intelligence for resources, a solicitousness, and finally a sense of reason that we ourselves are lacking on both a private as well as global scale.

Hence, Smith has effaced humans from his art and retained the things that were once close to them, which clothed them and provided them warmth, which fed them or stored their food, which they used as tools, for communicating, or on which a hope could be pinned. He keeps what is left from the lives that his art only ever recalls as something distant, putting in their place a physiology and psychology of things that present themselves as more human, more sensitive, and more responsible than the social world they left behind. Nevertheless, in doing so, Smith inserts »no« apocalyptic visions or post-human sentiment into his work, and a critique of societal conditions is also more of an inference, not the heart of the matter. The world of art is a world of objects that are expendable in case of doubt. Smith introduces things to this world that were expendable elsewhere but which report what is indispensable. They do this in our place and if they show a »way out,« then it is to follow their example and to leave out the rest.

Text by Alexander Koch

Ein fast leerer Ausstellungsraum ohne eigenes Licht und ohne eigentliche Verwendung. Dass darin etwas »gezeigt« wird, kann man nicht wirklich behaupten. Flüchtig nehmen wir zwei beleuchtete Plastikwannen wahr und gehen einen Raum weiter. Einen Moment später sagt mein Kollege Nikolaus: »Irgendetwas fühlte sich da drinnen nicht gut an.« Also gehen wir noch einmal zurück. Das Gefühl, das Nikolaus meinte, rührte von einem atmosphärischen Nullpunkt her, so als hätte jemand den Stecker herausgezogen und alle Lebensfunktionen des Ortes abgestellt. Und die wenigen Dinge, die sich ausmachen ließen, schienen sich an die Ränder des Saales zu drücken und dort mit sich allein zu bleiben. Als wir sie schließlich eine Weile lang genauer ansehen, fällt zwischen uns ein Satz, der uns seither begleitet: »Hier zeigt jemand die verwundete Seele Amerikas zu Beginn des 21. Jahrhunderts«, den Schmerz und den gebrochenen Stolz einer Gesellschaft, die ihre eigene Inhumanität so leidenschaftlich verdrängt. Wir sind in Yale, 2008, Abschlussausstellung der MA-Studenten von Jessica Stockholder, die uns am Nachmittag den Autor des Raumes vorstellt: Michael E. Smith.

In einer Ecke des Ausstellungsraumes stand eine der beiden Plastikwannen, der Boden mit grünem Wasser bedeckt. Darin lagen zwei gebrauchte Tennissocken über Kreuz und schauten mit ihren Öffnungen je in verschiedene Richtungen nach außen. Eine Lampe klemmte am Beckenrand, überblickte das spärliche Aquarium und richtete ihr Licht und ihre Wärme hinunter in eine trübe Algenblüte, wo das Sockenpaar wie regungslose Fische kauerte. Unweit dieser Wanne lag eine Glaskugel auf einem Heizkörper. Sie sammelte Reste des Lichtscheins ein und gab sie als kleinen hellen Punkt an die Wand weiter. Keine Hellseherei, statt Zukunft nur ein Bündel Lichtreflexe. Auf der anderen Seite des Raumes hatte sich ein Radio mit seinem eigenen Stromkabel an einen Luftbefeuchter festgebunden. Darüber, an der Decke, fehlte die Glasabdeckung einer Lampe und statt der Glühbirne, die dort hingehörte, steckte in ihrem Gewinde der Kopf einer Zahnbürste fest, deren Stiel am Ende versengt war. Leise brummte im Nebenzimmer ein Getränkeautomat.

Wie jede seiner späteren Ausstellungen war auch diese frühe Installation in der Yale University getragen von einer bedrückend stillen Präsenz einfacher Gegenstände, die man eigentlich nur in einer animistischen Sprache beschreiben kann, die ihnen Gefühle, Verhalten, ja ein Schicksal andichtet: Sie scheinen zu leiden, zu frieren, sind verwundet oder suchen nach Schutz, liegen einsam in der Leere oder klammern sich an ein Stück Architektur. Manchmal tragen sie einander, stützen oder umhüllen sich, retten sich unter ein Möbel oder hängen unbemerkt von der Decke. Oft zeigen ihre Oberflächen Spuren buchstäblicher Misshandlungen, die ihnen im Atelier zugefügt werden. Sie sind vernarbt und verkrustet, durch Harze und Lacke verschlossen oder von Industrieschaum verklebt. Meist haben sie die Proportionen von Torsi und Gliedmaßen oder die Größe eines Kopfes. Ihr Bezug zum menschlichen Körper ist ständig präsent, und doch bleiben sie unter sich in einer Welt der Objekte, in der Menschen gar nicht vorzukommen scheinen. Und wenn, dann als Bedrohung.

Michael E. Smiths Werk hat seinen Ausgangspunkt in Detroit. Die Geburtsstadt des Fordismus war einst Inbegriff für Errungenschaften des New Deal, der den Lohnarbeitern soziale Sicherheit und Teilhabe an Konsum und Fortschritt versprach. Doch die Boomtown der Automobilindustrie überschritt ihre Grenzen des Wachstums, lange bevor die gleichnamige Studie des Club of Rome 1972 den Wirtschaftszentren der Ersten Welt ihre künftige Schrumpfung vorhersagte. Als erste US-Metropole brach sie völlig zusammen, nachdem die wohlhabenden, vornehmlich weißen Bevölkerungsschichten ihre Vermögen aus der glücklosen Stadt brachten. Die darauf folgende urbane und soziale Zerstörung Detroits scheint beispiellos – und ist doch nur ein erster Modellfall für die Auflösung eines Gemeinwesens, dem, auf dem Nullpunkt seiner eigenen Fortschrittsversprechen angekommen, nichts Besseres einfällt, als weite Bevölkerungsteile auf den Trümmern der Moderne sitzen zu lassen. Detroit ist die erste große Wohlstandsruine.

Untitled (2010): Aus Telefonkabel hat Smith eine Schale geformt, die sich vergleichbar in ethnologischen Sammlungen finden ließe, nur dass sie dort aus schneckenförmig übereinandergelegten Tonwürsten bestünde. Als Griff, der dieser Schale die Anmutung einer Pfanne verleiht, dient das abgebrochene Ende einer Neonröhre, das mit weißem Gaffa stabilisiert ist. Die Fernkommunikation ist unterbrochen und das Licht ist aus – das war es auch in der Ausstellung bei KOW in Berlin im Jahre 2010, wo die Schale lag. Aber es gibt wohl kaum etwas Basaleres und Dringlicheres als ein Gefäß, aus dem man trinkt, oder eine Pfanne, in der man Essen wärmt. Ein Objekt, im Grundsatz so alt wie die ersten Künste der Menschen, Gegenstände des täglichen Bedarfs herzustellen, hier gewissermaßen rückgebaut aus elektrotechnischen Elementen, die nicht nur in manchen Stadtteilen Detroits, sondern an vielen weiteren Orten der Welt keinen Sinn machen, solange der Strom fehlt.

Smith verwendet Gegenstände, die sich als Reste vergangener Prosperität in den Nischen eines sparsamen Lebens finden: Abgelegte Kleidungsstücke wie Socken, T-Shirts und Mützen, Haushaltsgegenstände wie Flaschen und Schüsseln, Teile von technischem Gerät oder von Tierkadavern; Dinge, die im Umfeld des Künstlers greifbar sind und zuvor körperliche Grundbedürfnisse nach Nahrung, Wärme und Unversehrtheit sicherten oder technischen Alltagsroutinen dienten. Smith nutzt sie für eine Kunst, die dem vorhandenen Inventar nichts hinzuaddiert. Stattdessen überführt er sein Material in einen Zustand, in dem es den Schmerz und die Angst einer Existenz noch nachempfindet, nachdem deren physische und seelische Grundlagen zerstört sind. 2010 und 2013 platzierte er im oberen Raum von KOW je drei Werke, deren Proportionen einem Kopf, einem Oberkörper und einem Arm entsprachen – Teile eines weit versprengten Körpers, dessen Fragmente sich rigide den Raumachsen der Architektur unterordneten. Ein Objekt bestand aus drei Baseballkappen, die wie ein kaputtes Schaufelrad zusammengefügt waren und eine Porträtbüste ergaben, die unter gelbem Klebeband erstickte.

Smiths Objekte erscheinen wie physische Rekonstruktionen emotionaler Angreifbarkeit und Versehrtheit, seine Ausstellungen wie eine Archäologie der Humanität. Sie entstehen aus einem schmalen Fundus ausgewählter und gegebenenfalls präparierter Materialien, die erst vor Ort ihre endgültige Form finden und sich in die gegebene Situation einfügen. Materialbilder, die von Beginn an einen eigenen Strang in Smiths Werkverlauf bilden, muten wie versengte, aschene oder vernarbte Haut an. Ähnlich geht Smith in seinen Videos vor: Jellyfish (2011) ist der statische Blick auf den ledrig-schuppigen Körper eines blasspinken Fisches, dessen Aquarium so eng bemessen ist, dass er sich nur auf der Stelle bewegt. Miles (2007) wiederholt die sekundenkurze Filmsequenz eines Konzertmitschnitts von Miles Davis, dessen schweißnasses krauses Haar im Scheinwerferlicht die Form von Hirnmasse annimmt. Fotografien, die Smith 2008 in Detroit machte, zeigen teils ausgebrannte, teils zusammenstürzende Wohnhäuser, die im Dunkel der Nacht vor dem Blitzlicht der Kamera zurückschrecken.

Ersticken, auf der Stelle treten, ausgeliefert sein oder seinen Verletzungen erliegen, das scheint dieses junge Werk zunächst zu dokumentieren, das totenstill vor einem liegt, meist am Boden. Ich war zunächst überrascht, schließlich schien es mir völlig plausibel, als Smith sich in einem Gespräch zwischen uns auf Joseph Beuys berief. Dessen Vorstellung einer Kunst, die vielleicht mentale Reinigungs- und Heilungsprozesse am Gesellschaftskörper würde leisten können, schien einer der Grundimpulse seiner Arbeit zu sein und eröffnete ihr wohl eine für mich unvermutet progressive, ja solidarische Perspektive. An Beuys’ Symbolismus hielt sich Smith nicht auf, übertrug aber den Ansatz einer rekonvaleszenten Semantik auf die ruinöse Physis seiner Objekte. Beuys hatte mit seiner Installation Zeige deine Wunde (1974–1975) explizit darauf hingewiesen, dass »man die Krankheit offenbaren muss, die man heilen will«, und er hoffte darauf, dass im Angesicht gesellschaftlicher Traumata seine Kunst »wenn man genau hinhört, einen Ausweg weist«. (Süddeutsche Zeitung vom 26./27.1.1980)

Ein frühes Schlüsselwerk aus dem Jahr 2008 zeigt, wie Smith Beuys Position wohl interpretierte. Er hat eine kleine Buddha-Statue aus Plastik zersägt, den Oberkörper der Figur beseitigt und den Kopf so auf dem Rumpf befestigt, dass er wie eine Knollennase im Gesicht eines Fischkopfes wirkt, dessen weit geöffneter Mund an einen Wels denken lässt. Buddhas Hände wurden abgeschlagen, um die Fischaugen zu markieren. Seine Gesichtszüge sind glatt abgeschnitten, sodass die Schädelkonturen wie in einer Computertomografie hervortreten. Nun ist der Wels eben jener wenig attraktive Bewohner von Gewässern, an deren schlammigem Grund er alles frisst, was ihm vors Maul kommt, lebendig oder tot. Das macht ihn unschmackhaft, aber anpassungsfähig. Smith demontiert ein Symbol höheren Bewusstseins und spiritueller Reinigung – eine klare Abgrenzung von Beuys’ Metaphysik –, um an dessen Stelle das Bild eines Organismus zu setzen, der nicht wählerisch ist und nahe den schmutzigen Sedimenten eines Ökosystems herausfiltert, was er zum Leben braucht.

Die Dinge, in und mit denen wir leben, sind mehr als nur Beiwerk des Selbst. Da, wo sie das Überleben sichern, sind sie unsere Existenz. Zu einem Zeitpunkt, da westliche Gesellschaften die Grenzen ihres Wachstums überschritten haben und ihre Lebensweise von Expansion auf Selbsterhalt umstellen müssten, hält Smith dem ökologischen und ökonomischen Desaster der Epoche einen Materialismus der Grundbedürfnisse entgegen. Asketische Ideale des »Weniger ist Mehr!« unterstützt es aber gerade nicht. Denn längst verbreiten sich bescheidene Lebensweisen wider Willen, und die wirtschaftliche Umverteilung von unten nach oben treibt inzwischen die Angst vor dem sozialen Abstieg auch in der Mittelschicht. Für Viele bedeutet »Weniger« das Leben an einer Schmerzgrenze, die Smiths Objekte anstelle eines Gemeinwesens nachfühlen, das für seine Bedürfnisse taub geworden ist. Gleichwohl ist das, was diese Objekte »tun« oder »erleben«, unserer emotionalen Erfahrung und unserer Körper- und Raumwahrnehmung so vertraut, dass sich die Entfremdung zwischen Subjekt und Objekt auflöst und uns die Situation von Alltagsdingen so nahegeht, dass sie unsere Empathie wecken.

Untitled (2013): Am Boden liegt ein Wespennest, fragil im Material und mit einer offenen Flanke an einer Seite. Die verlassene Behausung einer ganzen Gemeinschaft. Darüber, mit den gleichen Außenmaßen, ein Kapuzenpullover, der in sich selbst hineingefaltet ist. Wie ein Puffer schützt und wärmt er das leere Nest und wie es scheint auch sich selbst. Betrachtet man die Rauminstallation als Ganzes – 2013 bei KOW –, richtet sich aus der Kapuze ein hoffnungsloser Blick auf eine nur Schritte entfernt stehende große Schüssel, über die ein T-Shirt gezogen ist wie über den Bauch eines übergewichtigen Teenagers. Tatsächlich stammt die Schüssel aus einer Bäckerei, in ihr wurde Teig angerührt. Fat Albert (2013), zitiert wie so oft bei Smith einen populären Zeichentrickcharakter, hier einen fettleibigen Jugendlichen. Vergeblich scheint der rundliche Torso mit herabhängenden leeren Ärmeln vorwärts zu rudern und bleibt liegen wie eine straff gespannte Trommel, die man schlägt. Weiter entfernt liegt ein auf Armlänge zusammengefaltetes Kopfkissen, dessen offene, bettelnde Hand eine Schippe ist, die zum Austeilen von Tiermast diente.

Dave (2013): Zwei Muscheln liegen einander zugekehrt am Boden. In dem Spalt zwischen ihnen klemmt eine tote Taube, halb wie gefräßig ins Innere der Weichtiere gezogen, halb fürsorglich festgehalten inmitten eines existenziellen Lebenskampfes, in dem der Vogel einen Flügel steil emporreckt. Erneut erscheinen schützende Gehäuse, die Smiths Œuvre durchziehen. In den weitläufigen Räumen des Ludwig Forum Aachen bildet das Muschelpaar eine kleine, geschlossene, nach außen geradezu bewehrte Einheit, indem es seine offene und verletzliche Seite einander zuwendet. Freilich, auch das Paar ist nur noch leere Hülle, und den Taubenkadaver hinzugerechnet sind hier drei tote Wesen miteinander verbunden, die doch gleichwohl zusammenstehen wie eine kleine Gemeinschaft in feindlicher Umwelt. Der Titel Dave verweist auf Dave Thomas, den populären Inhaber der Hamburgerkette Wendy’s, eines der Junkfood-Unternehmen, das dazu beiträgt, die Lebenserwartung in den USA zu verkürzen.

Hier wie in anderen Arbeiten ist der starke Einfluss des Surrealismus in den USA noch spürbar. Was Smiths Objekt- und Materialkombinationen aber etwa von Meret Oppenheims berühmter Pelztasse von 1936 unterscheidet ist, dass die ungeheure Unwahrscheinlichkeit ihres Zusammentreffens so plausibel scheint und dass ihre bisweilen bestechende Poesie keiner Fantasie, sondern einem praktischen Sinn fürs Überleben entspringt. Für unsere Konsum- und Wegwerfmentalität wäre schon das alleine kein geringer Perspektivwechsel. Smith geht aber noch weiter: Er zeigt die Wunden einer Kultur, in der Menschen weder mit sich noch mit anderen, geschweige denn mit ihrer Umwelt vernünftig umgehen und immer häufiger mit dem Schaden leben müssen, den sie selbst angerichtet haben. Hört man genau hin, um bei Beuys zu bleiben, legt Smiths Arbeit eine Ressourcenintelligenz, eine Fürsorglichkeit und letztlich eine Vernunft an den Tag, die wir selber im privaten wie im globalen Maßstab vermissen lassen.

Also hat Smith den Menschen aus seinem Werk gestrichen und die Gegenstände behalten, die ihm einmal nahestanden, die ihn kleideten und wärmten, die ihn ernährten oder seine Lebensmittel aufbewahrten, die er als Werkzeuge nutzte, zur Kommunikation, oder an die sich Hoffnungen knüpfen ließen. Er behält, was vom Leben der Menschen übrig ist, das seine Kunst immer nur als etwas Fernes erinnert, und setzt an seine Stelle eine Physiologie und Psychologie der Dinge, die sich humaner, empfindsamer und verantwortlicher zeigen als die soziale Welt, die sie hinter sich lassen. Dennoch setzt Smith dabei gerade keine apokalyptische Vision ins Werk, keine posthumane Stimmung, und auch Kritik an den gesellschaftlichen Zuständen ist eher eine Ableitung, nicht aber der Kern der Sache. Die Welt der Kunst ist eine Welt von Gegenständen, die im Zweifelsfall verzichtbar sind. In sie führt Smith Dinge ein, die andernorts verzichtbar waren und nun aufzeichnen, worauf wir nicht verzichten können. Sie tun dies an unserer statt, und wenn sie einen »Ausweg« zeigen, dann den, es ihnen gleichzutun und alles Überflüssige wegzulassen.

  • Catfish Instead of Buddha. Michael E. Smith’s Materialism of Basic Needs
  • GermanEnglish

    Text by Alexander Koch

    A virtually bare exhibition space without its own lighting and without a discernable function. Hard to say that something is actually being »presented» there. We briefly notice two illuminated plastic tubs and move on to the next room. A second later my colleague Nikolaus says: »Something didn’t feel right in there.« So we go back. The feeling Nikolaus mentioned came from an atmospheric ground zero, as if someone had pulled the plug and shut down all the vital functions of the place. And the few things we could make out seemed to have scampered off into the margins of the space, keeping all to themselves. After looking at them more closely for awhile, a thought came to us that still stays with us today: »Here someone is presenting America’s wounded soul at the beginning of the twenty-first century«—the pain and the broken pride of a society that so fervently suppresses its own inhumanity. It is 2008 and we are at Yale, at the MFA thesis exhibition for students of Jessica Stockholder, who introduces us that afternoon to the room’s creator: Michael E. Smith.

    In a corner of the exhibition room, one of the two plastic tubs rested on the floor, filled with a hand’s width of greenish water. In the tub, two used tennis socks were crisscrossed, each open end pointing outward in a different direction. A lamp was clamped to the tub’s edge overlooking the frugal aquarium, its light and warmth aimed downward into the cloudy algal bloom, where the pair of socks cowered like motionless fish. Close by, a crystal ball was positioned on top of a radiator. It gathered up the residual traces of light, focusing them into a small, bright point on the wall. No clairvoyance or future here, just a beam of reflected light. On the other side of the room, a radio had tethered itself to a humidifier with its own power cord. Overhead, on the ceiling, a glass cover was missing from a light, and instead of the light bulb, which belonged there, the head of a toothbrush with a burned handle tip was jammed into the socket threads. A soft-drink vending machine hummed quietly in the adjacent room.

    Like each of his later exhibitions, this early installation at Yale University was also underpinned by the oppressively silent presence of simple objects, which can barely be spoken about other than in an animistic language, one ascribing them emotions, demeanor, and even a fate: they seem to be hurting, to be cold, are wounded or seek protection, lie alone in the emptiness, or cling to a part of the architecture. Sometimes they prop each other up, lean on or envelope one another, save themselves by crawling under a piece of furniture, or hang unnoticed from the ceiling. Frequently, their surfaces show the literal traces of abuse they were subjected to in the studio. They are scarred and encrusted, sealed off with resins and lacquer, or stuck together with industrial foam. Most are the size of torsos and limbs, or resemble a head in size. Their relationship to the human body is ever-present, and yet they remain among themselves in a world of objects where humans do not feature at all. And if they do, then as a threat.

    Michael E. Smith’s work has its roots in Detroit. The birthplace of Fordism once embodied the achievements of the New Deal, promising wageworkers social security and sufficient affluence to partake in consumerist society and enjoy the benefits of progress. Yet the boomtown of the automobile industry overstepped its »limits to growth« long before the 1972 similarly named study by the Club of Rome presaged the future shrinking of the developed world’s economic centers. It was the first major US city to completely collapse after the affluent, mostly white segment of the population pulled its wealth out of the hapless city. The urban and social destruction that followed was unprecedented—it proved however to be only the first example of the disintegration of a community that, having plummeted from the heady heights of its own promises of progress, comes up with nothing better than abandoning broad sections of the populace to the debris of Modernity. Detroit is the first large-scale ruin of prosperity.

    Untitled, 2010: Smith has used a telephone cord to construct a bowl similar to those found in ethnological collections, except of course that there it would be made out of a layered spiral of rolled-out clay. Serving as a handle and giving the bowl the look and feel of a pan, is the broken end of a neon tube, shored up with gaffe’s tape. Long-distance communication has been broken off and the light is out—also at the 2010 exhibition at KOW where the bowl appeared. But there is probably nothing more elemental and crucial than a vessel used for drinking or a pan for cooking food. An object, in essence as ancient as one of mankind’s very first arts, namely to produce things to meet practical daily needs, but here recycled backwards as it were, tinkered together out of electrical elements which, not only in Detroit but in many other places around the world, have absolutely no purpose should the power grid be down.

    Smith makes use of objects, the vestiges of bygone prosperity, which are found in the niches of a frugal life: discarded clothing items like socks, T-shirts, and hats, household items like bottles and dishes, parts of technical devices or animal cadavers; things readily available in the artist’s surrounds, that had previously met basic human needs of food, warmth, and physical well-being, or served to keep our technology-dependent daily routines up and running. Smith uses them for an art that refrains from adding to what is given. Instead, he transforms his material into a state that still reverberates with the pain and anguish of an existence whose physical and emotional foundations have been destroyed. In 2010 and 2013, he placed in KOW’s upper space three works whose proportions corresponded to a head, a torso, and an arm—parts of a body scattered widely about, their fragments rigidly arranged to the architectural axes of the room. One object consisted of three baseball caps, which were fitted together like a broken paddle wheel, resulting in a portrait bust suffocated under yellow tape.

    Smith’s objects seem like physical reconstructions of emotional vulnerability and disfigurement, his exhibitions like an archeology of humanity. They are created from a modest stock of selected and, when needed, prepared materials, which only take their final form on site and insert themselves into particular situations. Material images which have formed an independent strand in Smith’s oeuvre from the very outset appear like scorched, ashen, or scarred skin. Smith takes a similar approach in his videos: Jellyfish, 2011, is a fixed view shot of the leathery-scaly body of a pale pink fish, whose aquarium is so small it only has room to move in place. Miles, 2007, loops a seconds-long film sequence from a concert recording of Miles Davis, whose perspiration-drenched, frizzy hair takes on the form of brain matter in the spotlight. Photographs taken by Smith in Detroit in 2008 present ruinous, partially burned-out, partially collapsing residential houses in the dark of night like hulking, silent cadavers shrinking back from the flash of the camera.

    Suffocation, marking time, being at one’s mercy, or succumbing to one’s injuries—this appears at first view to be what this young oeuvre is documenting, presented deathly still before the viewer, lying mostly on the floor. So I was initially surprised— but ultimately it struck me as completely plausible—when Smith made reference to Joseph Beuys during one of our conversations. Beuys’s idea of an art, that would potentially be capable of purifying and healing the body social, seemed to be one of the basic impulses underlying Smith’s work, and offered him a progressive, even solidary perspective, that came unexpected for me. But Smith avoided becoming fettered to Beuys’s symbolism, transferring instead the approach of a convalescent semantics onto the ruinous physique of his objects. With his installation Zeige deine Wunde (Show Your Wound) (1974–75), Beuys had explicitly pointed out that »you must reveal the illness you want to heal,« and hoped, with regard to societal traumas, that his art »provides a way out, if you listen to it carefully.« (Süddeutsche Zeitung from January 26–27, 1980)

    An early key work from 2008 demonstrates Smith’s take on this. He sawed apart a small plastic Buddha statue, discarded the figure’s torso, reattaching the head to the body so that it looks like the bulbous nose on the face of a fish head, whose gaping mouth recalls a catfish. Buddha’s hands were lopped off in order to indicate the fish eyes. His facial features have been cut smooth so that the contours of his skull protrude forward much like in computed tomography. Now the catfish is just that not-so-attractive water inhabitant that devours everything in front of its mouth at the muddy bottom, living or dead. That makes it unpalatable but adaptive. Smith dismantles a symbol of higher consciousness and spiritual cleansing—a demarcation from Beuys’s metaphysics—in order to put in its place the image of an unselective organism living close to the dirty sediments of an ecosystem and filtering out what it needs to survive.

    The things in and with which we live are more than mere accessories of the self. Especially when they safeguard our survival, they are our existence. At a time when Western societies have surpassed the limits of their growth and have had to switch from expansion to self-preservation, Smith contrasts this era’s environmental and ecological disasters with a materialism of basic needs. Yet his art pointedly refuses to align itself with ascetic ideals proclaiming that »less is more.« Modest lifestyles have long started to spread against the will of those who adopt them, and upward economic redistribution is teaching the middle classes the fear of social decline. For many people, »less« means a bare-bones life, and Smith’s objects trace that threshold of pain in lieu of a body politic that has become deaf to its own needs. They »do« or »experience« what we happily ignore, but what is so familiar to our emotional experience and our physical and spatial perception that the alienation between subject and object melts away and we come so near to the condition of an everyday thing that it awakens our empathy.

    Untitled, 2013: A wasps’ nest is lying on the floor, physically fragile and with an opening on one side. The abandoned dwelling of an entire community. On top, with the same external dimensions, a hooded sweatshirt is folded into itself. Like a buffer it protects and warms the empty nest and, it would seem, itself as well. Viewed in the context of the room’s installation, at KOW in 2013, the sweatshirt looks forlornly toward a large bowl a few steps away, over which a T-shirt has been pulled like over the stomach of an overweight teenager. In fact the bowl comes from a bakery and was used for mixing dough. The title of the work, Fat Albert, 2013, quotes a popular cartoon character, as Smith frequently does, in this case a corpulent adolescent. With droopy, empty sleeves, the rounded torso seems to be rowing forward in vain, stuck in place like a tautly stretched drum for beating. Further away is an arm-length, folded pillowcase, whose open, imploring hand is a scoop once used to pass out animal feed.

    Dave, 2013: Two shells facing one another are resting on the floor. Pinned between them is a dead pigeon, half pulled voraciously inside the shells, half pensively caught in the middle of an existential fight for life, in which the bird extends a wing upward. Present once again is the protective housing that runs throughout Smith’s work. Lying by itself in the expansive spaces of the Ludwig Forum Aachen, the pair of shells forms a small, outwardly protective, closed-off entity by turning their open and vulnerable sides toward one another. Of course, the pair is also just an empty shell, and, when counting the pigeon cadaver, three dead beings are joined together here. Nevertheless, they stand together like a small community in a hostile environment. Dave, the title, refers to Dave Thomas, the popular founder of the Wendy’s hamburger chain, one of the junk food enterprises that does not increase lifespan in the US. Given that the meat patties of hamburgers are pinned between two buns like the pigeon between the shells, the work and the title are rife with synonymous implications.

    Here, as in other works, the powerful influence of Surrealism in the US can still be felt. But what differentiates Smith’s combinations of objects and materials from, for instance, Meret Oppenheim’s famous 1936 fur lined teacup, is that the tremendous unlikelihood of their encounter appears so plausible and that their occasional beguiling poetry is not rooted in fantasy but in a pragmatic sense for survival. For our consumer and throwaway mentalities this alone would be no small shift in perspective. But Smith goes further: he shows the wounds of a culture whose members neither deal with themselves rationally nor with others—not to mention their environment—and increasingly live in the devastation they themselves have caused. If one listens carefully, to continue with Beuys, Smith’s work displays an intelligence for resources, a solicitousness, and finally a sense of reason that we ourselves are lacking on both a private as well as global scale.

    Hence, Smith has effaced humans from his art and retained the things that were once close to them, which clothed them and provided them warmth, which fed them or stored their food, which they used as tools, for communicating, or on which a hope could be pinned. He keeps what is left from the lives that his art only ever recalls as something distant, putting in their place a physiology and psychology of things that present themselves as more human, more sensitive, and more responsible than the social world they left behind. Nevertheless, in doing so, Smith inserts »no« apocalyptic visions or post-human sentiment into his work, and a critique of societal conditions is also more of an inference, not the heart of the matter. The world of art is a world of objects that are expendable in case of doubt. Smith introduces things to this world that were expendable elsewhere but which report what is indispensable. They do this in our place and if they show a »way out,« then it is to follow their example and to leave out the rest.

    Text by Alexander Koch

    Ein fast leerer Ausstellungsraum ohne eigenes Licht und ohne eigentliche Verwendung. Dass darin etwas »gezeigt« wird, kann man nicht wirklich behaupten. Flüchtig nehmen wir zwei beleuchtete Plastikwannen wahr und gehen einen Raum weiter. Einen Moment später sagt mein Kollege Nikolaus: »Irgendetwas fühlte sich da drinnen nicht gut an.« Also gehen wir noch einmal zurück. Das Gefühl, das Nikolaus meinte, rührte von einem atmosphärischen Nullpunkt her, so als hätte jemand den Stecker herausgezogen und alle Lebensfunktionen des Ortes abgestellt. Und die wenigen Dinge, die sich ausmachen ließen, schienen sich an die Ränder des Saales zu drücken und dort mit sich allein zu bleiben. Als wir sie schließlich eine Weile lang genauer ansehen, fällt zwischen uns ein Satz, der uns seither begleitet: »Hier zeigt jemand die verwundete Seele Amerikas zu Beginn des 21. Jahrhunderts«, den Schmerz und den gebrochenen Stolz einer Gesellschaft, die ihre eigene Inhumanität so leidenschaftlich verdrängt. Wir sind in Yale, 2008, Abschlussausstellung der MA-Studenten von Jessica Stockholder, die uns am Nachmittag den Autor des Raumes vorstellt: Michael E. Smith.

    In einer Ecke des Ausstellungsraumes stand eine der beiden Plastikwannen, der Boden mit grünem Wasser bedeckt. Darin lagen zwei gebrauchte Tennissocken über Kreuz und schauten mit ihren Öffnungen je in verschiedene Richtungen nach außen. Eine Lampe klemmte am Beckenrand, überblickte das spärliche Aquarium und richtete ihr Licht und ihre Wärme hinunter in eine trübe Algenblüte, wo das Sockenpaar wie regungslose Fische kauerte. Unweit dieser Wanne lag eine Glaskugel auf einem Heizkörper. Sie sammelte Reste des Lichtscheins ein und gab sie als kleinen hellen Punkt an die Wand weiter. Keine Hellseherei, statt Zukunft nur ein Bündel Lichtreflexe. Auf der anderen Seite des Raumes hatte sich ein Radio mit seinem eigenen Stromkabel an einen Luftbefeuchter festgebunden. Darüber, an der Decke, fehlte die Glasabdeckung einer Lampe und statt der Glühbirne, die dort hingehörte, steckte in ihrem Gewinde der Kopf einer Zahnbürste fest, deren Stiel am Ende versengt war. Leise brummte im Nebenzimmer ein Getränkeautomat.

    Wie jede seiner späteren Ausstellungen war auch diese frühe Installation in der Yale University getragen von einer bedrückend stillen Präsenz einfacher Gegenstände, die man eigentlich nur in einer animistischen Sprache beschreiben kann, die ihnen Gefühle, Verhalten, ja ein Schicksal andichtet: Sie scheinen zu leiden, zu frieren, sind verwundet oder suchen nach Schutz, liegen einsam in der Leere oder klammern sich an ein Stück Architektur. Manchmal tragen sie einander, stützen oder umhüllen sich, retten sich unter ein Möbel oder hängen unbemerkt von der Decke. Oft zeigen ihre Oberflächen Spuren buchstäblicher Misshandlungen, die ihnen im Atelier zugefügt werden. Sie sind vernarbt und verkrustet, durch Harze und Lacke verschlossen oder von Industrieschaum verklebt. Meist haben sie die Proportionen von Torsi und Gliedmaßen oder die Größe eines Kopfes. Ihr Bezug zum menschlichen Körper ist ständig präsent, und doch bleiben sie unter sich in einer Welt der Objekte, in der Menschen gar nicht vorzukommen scheinen. Und wenn, dann als Bedrohung.

    Michael E. Smiths Werk hat seinen Ausgangspunkt in Detroit. Die Geburtsstadt des Fordismus war einst Inbegriff für Errungenschaften des New Deal, der den Lohnarbeitern soziale Sicherheit und Teilhabe an Konsum und Fortschritt versprach. Doch die Boomtown der Automobilindustrie überschritt ihre Grenzen des Wachstums, lange bevor die gleichnamige Studie des Club of Rome 1972 den Wirtschaftszentren der Ersten Welt ihre künftige Schrumpfung vorhersagte. Als erste US-Metropole brach sie völlig zusammen, nachdem die wohlhabenden, vornehmlich weißen Bevölkerungsschichten ihre Vermögen aus der glücklosen Stadt brachten. Die darauf folgende urbane und soziale Zerstörung Detroits scheint beispiellos – und ist doch nur ein erster Modellfall für die Auflösung eines Gemeinwesens, dem, auf dem Nullpunkt seiner eigenen Fortschrittsversprechen angekommen, nichts Besseres einfällt, als weite Bevölkerungsteile auf den Trümmern der Moderne sitzen zu lassen. Detroit ist die erste große Wohlstandsruine.

    Untitled (2010): Aus Telefonkabel hat Smith eine Schale geformt, die sich vergleichbar in ethnologischen Sammlungen finden ließe, nur dass sie dort aus schneckenförmig übereinandergelegten Tonwürsten bestünde. Als Griff, der dieser Schale die Anmutung einer Pfanne verleiht, dient das abgebrochene Ende einer Neonröhre, das mit weißem Gaffa stabilisiert ist. Die Fernkommunikation ist unterbrochen und das Licht ist aus – das war es auch in der Ausstellung bei KOW in Berlin im Jahre 2010, wo die Schale lag. Aber es gibt wohl kaum etwas Basaleres und Dringlicheres als ein Gefäß, aus dem man trinkt, oder eine Pfanne, in der man Essen wärmt. Ein Objekt, im Grundsatz so alt wie die ersten Künste der Menschen, Gegenstände des täglichen Bedarfs herzustellen, hier gewissermaßen rückgebaut aus elektrotechnischen Elementen, die nicht nur in manchen Stadtteilen Detroits, sondern an vielen weiteren Orten der Welt keinen Sinn machen, solange der Strom fehlt.

    Smith verwendet Gegenstände, die sich als Reste vergangener Prosperität in den Nischen eines sparsamen Lebens finden: Abgelegte Kleidungsstücke wie Socken, T-Shirts und Mützen, Haushaltsgegenstände wie Flaschen und Schüsseln, Teile von technischem Gerät oder von Tierkadavern; Dinge, die im Umfeld des Künstlers greifbar sind und zuvor körperliche Grundbedürfnisse nach Nahrung, Wärme und Unversehrtheit sicherten oder technischen Alltagsroutinen dienten. Smith nutzt sie für eine Kunst, die dem vorhandenen Inventar nichts hinzuaddiert. Stattdessen überführt er sein Material in einen Zustand, in dem es den Schmerz und die Angst einer Existenz noch nachempfindet, nachdem deren physische und seelische Grundlagen zerstört sind. 2010 und 2013 platzierte er im oberen Raum von KOW je drei Werke, deren Proportionen einem Kopf, einem Oberkörper und einem Arm entsprachen – Teile eines weit versprengten Körpers, dessen Fragmente sich rigide den Raumachsen der Architektur unterordneten. Ein Objekt bestand aus drei Baseballkappen, die wie ein kaputtes Schaufelrad zusammengefügt waren und eine Porträtbüste ergaben, die unter gelbem Klebeband erstickte.

    Smiths Objekte erscheinen wie physische Rekonstruktionen emotionaler Angreifbarkeit und Versehrtheit, seine Ausstellungen wie eine Archäologie der Humanität. Sie entstehen aus einem schmalen Fundus ausgewählter und gegebenenfalls präparierter Materialien, die erst vor Ort ihre endgültige Form finden und sich in die gegebene Situation einfügen. Materialbilder, die von Beginn an einen eigenen Strang in Smiths Werkverlauf bilden, muten wie versengte, aschene oder vernarbte Haut an. Ähnlich geht Smith in seinen Videos vor: Jellyfish (2011) ist der statische Blick auf den ledrig-schuppigen Körper eines blasspinken Fisches, dessen Aquarium so eng bemessen ist, dass er sich nur auf der Stelle bewegt. Miles (2007) wiederholt die sekundenkurze Filmsequenz eines Konzertmitschnitts von Miles Davis, dessen schweißnasses krauses Haar im Scheinwerferlicht die Form von Hirnmasse annimmt. Fotografien, die Smith 2008 in Detroit machte, zeigen teils ausgebrannte, teils zusammenstürzende Wohnhäuser, die im Dunkel der Nacht vor dem Blitzlicht der Kamera zurückschrecken.

    Ersticken, auf der Stelle treten, ausgeliefert sein oder seinen Verletzungen erliegen, das scheint dieses junge Werk zunächst zu dokumentieren, das totenstill vor einem liegt, meist am Boden. Ich war zunächst überrascht, schließlich schien es mir völlig plausibel, als Smith sich in einem Gespräch zwischen uns auf Joseph Beuys berief. Dessen Vorstellung einer Kunst, die vielleicht mentale Reinigungs- und Heilungsprozesse am Gesellschaftskörper würde leisten können, schien einer der Grundimpulse seiner Arbeit zu sein und eröffnete ihr wohl eine für mich unvermutet progressive, ja solidarische Perspektive. An Beuys’ Symbolismus hielt sich Smith nicht auf, übertrug aber den Ansatz einer rekonvaleszenten Semantik auf die ruinöse Physis seiner Objekte. Beuys hatte mit seiner Installation Zeige deine Wunde (1974–1975) explizit darauf hingewiesen, dass »man die Krankheit offenbaren muss, die man heilen will«, und er hoffte darauf, dass im Angesicht gesellschaftlicher Traumata seine Kunst »wenn man genau hinhört, einen Ausweg weist«. (Süddeutsche Zeitung vom 26./27.1.1980)

    Ein frühes Schlüsselwerk aus dem Jahr 2008 zeigt, wie Smith Beuys Position wohl interpretierte. Er hat eine kleine Buddha-Statue aus Plastik zersägt, den Oberkörper der Figur beseitigt und den Kopf so auf dem Rumpf befestigt, dass er wie eine Knollennase im Gesicht eines Fischkopfes wirkt, dessen weit geöffneter Mund an einen Wels denken lässt. Buddhas Hände wurden abgeschlagen, um die Fischaugen zu markieren. Seine Gesichtszüge sind glatt abgeschnitten, sodass die Schädelkonturen wie in einer Computertomografie hervortreten. Nun ist der Wels eben jener wenig attraktive Bewohner von Gewässern, an deren schlammigem Grund er alles frisst, was ihm vors Maul kommt, lebendig oder tot. Das macht ihn unschmackhaft, aber anpassungsfähig. Smith demontiert ein Symbol höheren Bewusstseins und spiritueller Reinigung – eine klare Abgrenzung von Beuys’ Metaphysik –, um an dessen Stelle das Bild eines Organismus zu setzen, der nicht wählerisch ist und nahe den schmutzigen Sedimenten eines Ökosystems herausfiltert, was er zum Leben braucht.

    Die Dinge, in und mit denen wir leben, sind mehr als nur Beiwerk des Selbst. Da, wo sie das Überleben sichern, sind sie unsere Existenz. Zu einem Zeitpunkt, da westliche Gesellschaften die Grenzen ihres Wachstums überschritten haben und ihre Lebensweise von Expansion auf Selbsterhalt umstellen müssten, hält Smith dem ökologischen und ökonomischen Desaster der Epoche einen Materialismus der Grundbedürfnisse entgegen. Asketische Ideale des »Weniger ist Mehr!« unterstützt es aber gerade nicht. Denn längst verbreiten sich bescheidene Lebensweisen wider Willen, und die wirtschaftliche Umverteilung von unten nach oben treibt inzwischen die Angst vor dem sozialen Abstieg auch in der Mittelschicht. Für Viele bedeutet »Weniger« das Leben an einer Schmerzgrenze, die Smiths Objekte anstelle eines Gemeinwesens nachfühlen, das für seine Bedürfnisse taub geworden ist. Gleichwohl ist das, was diese Objekte »tun« oder »erleben«, unserer emotionalen Erfahrung und unserer Körper- und Raumwahrnehmung so vertraut, dass sich die Entfremdung zwischen Subjekt und Objekt auflöst und uns die Situation von Alltagsdingen so nahegeht, dass sie unsere Empathie wecken.

    Untitled (2013): Am Boden liegt ein Wespennest, fragil im Material und mit einer offenen Flanke an einer Seite. Die verlassene Behausung einer ganzen Gemeinschaft. Darüber, mit den gleichen Außenmaßen, ein Kapuzenpullover, der in sich selbst hineingefaltet ist. Wie ein Puffer schützt und wärmt er das leere Nest und wie es scheint auch sich selbst. Betrachtet man die Rauminstallation als Ganzes – 2013 bei KOW –, richtet sich aus der Kapuze ein hoffnungsloser Blick auf eine nur Schritte entfernt stehende große Schüssel, über die ein T-Shirt gezogen ist wie über den Bauch eines übergewichtigen Teenagers. Tatsächlich stammt die Schüssel aus einer Bäckerei, in ihr wurde Teig angerührt. Fat Albert (2013), zitiert wie so oft bei Smith einen populären Zeichentrickcharakter, hier einen fettleibigen Jugendlichen. Vergeblich scheint der rundliche Torso mit herabhängenden leeren Ärmeln vorwärts zu rudern und bleibt liegen wie eine straff gespannte Trommel, die man schlägt. Weiter entfernt liegt ein auf Armlänge zusammengefaltetes Kopfkissen, dessen offene, bettelnde Hand eine Schippe ist, die zum Austeilen von Tiermast diente.

    Dave (2013): Zwei Muscheln liegen einander zugekehrt am Boden. In dem Spalt zwischen ihnen klemmt eine tote Taube, halb wie gefräßig ins Innere der Weichtiere gezogen, halb fürsorglich festgehalten inmitten eines existenziellen Lebenskampfes, in dem der Vogel einen Flügel steil emporreckt. Erneut erscheinen schützende Gehäuse, die Smiths Œuvre durchziehen. In den weitläufigen Räumen des Ludwig Forum Aachen bildet das Muschelpaar eine kleine, geschlossene, nach außen geradezu bewehrte Einheit, indem es seine offene und verletzliche Seite einander zuwendet. Freilich, auch das Paar ist nur noch leere Hülle, und den Taubenkadaver hinzugerechnet sind hier drei tote Wesen miteinander verbunden, die doch gleichwohl zusammenstehen wie eine kleine Gemeinschaft in feindlicher Umwelt. Der Titel Dave verweist auf Dave Thomas, den populären Inhaber der Hamburgerkette Wendy’s, eines der Junkfood-Unternehmen, das dazu beiträgt, die Lebenserwartung in den USA zu verkürzen.

    Hier wie in anderen Arbeiten ist der starke Einfluss des Surrealismus in den USA noch spürbar. Was Smiths Objekt- und Materialkombinationen aber etwa von Meret Oppenheims berühmter Pelztasse von 1936 unterscheidet ist, dass die ungeheure Unwahrscheinlichkeit ihres Zusammentreffens so plausibel scheint und dass ihre bisweilen bestechende Poesie keiner Fantasie, sondern einem praktischen Sinn fürs Überleben entspringt. Für unsere Konsum- und Wegwerfmentalität wäre schon das alleine kein geringer Perspektivwechsel. Smith geht aber noch weiter: Er zeigt die Wunden einer Kultur, in der Menschen weder mit sich noch mit anderen, geschweige denn mit ihrer Umwelt vernünftig umgehen und immer häufiger mit dem Schaden leben müssen, den sie selbst angerichtet haben. Hört man genau hin, um bei Beuys zu bleiben, legt Smiths Arbeit eine Ressourcenintelligenz, eine Fürsorglichkeit und letztlich eine Vernunft an den Tag, die wir selber im privaten wie im globalen Maßstab vermissen lassen.

    Also hat Smith den Menschen aus seinem Werk gestrichen und die Gegenstände behalten, die ihm einmal nahestanden, die ihn kleideten und wärmten, die ihn ernährten oder seine Lebensmittel aufbewahrten, die er als Werkzeuge nutzte, zur Kommunikation, oder an die sich Hoffnungen knüpfen ließen. Er behält, was vom Leben der Menschen übrig ist, das seine Kunst immer nur als etwas Fernes erinnert, und setzt an seine Stelle eine Physiologie und Psychologie der Dinge, die sich humaner, empfindsamer und verantwortlicher zeigen als die soziale Welt, die sie hinter sich lassen. Dennoch setzt Smith dabei gerade keine apokalyptische Vision ins Werk, keine posthumane Stimmung, und auch Kritik an den gesellschaftlichen Zuständen ist eher eine Ableitung, nicht aber der Kern der Sache. Die Welt der Kunst ist eine Welt von Gegenständen, die im Zweifelsfall verzichtbar sind. In sie führt Smith Dinge ein, die andernorts verzichtbar waren und nun aufzeichnen, worauf wir nicht verzichten können. Sie tun dies an unserer statt, und wenn sie einen »Ausweg« zeigen, dann den, es ihnen gleichzutun und alles Überflüssige wegzulassen.

  • Option Lots. Eine Recherche von Brandlhuber+
  • Schmutz, der die Sonne fängt. Chris Martins sozialer Horizont einer spirituellen Abstraktion
  • Die kommende Übernahme. Für eine Entkoppelung von kulturpolitischer Definitionsmacht und Kulturadministration. 
Close