Uncheck the box to avoid the aggregation and analysis of your behaviour data collected on this website. Done
Looking for something specific?
Just start typing anywhere to search anything.

Yours, KOW
DeutschEnglish

Text by Alexander Koch

First published in: Gregor Jansen: Chris Martin, Staring Into The Sun, Kunsthalle Düsseldorf, Verlag der Buchhandlung Walther König, Düsseldorf, 2011

Painting and Buddhism are good pals. While wandering together through New York’s galleries and bars, Painting regularly ponders the difference between good and bad pictures – and Buddhism counters with old Tibetan words of wisdom on which Painting’s ambitions roll off like rain from the oil stains on the asphalt. When Chris Martin dispatches Painting and Buddhism through the streets of Chelsea, dirt crunches under their shoes. And while whimsically arguing about the essence of painting in Martin’s article »Buddhism, Landscape and the Absolute Truth about Abstract Painting« for The Brooklyn Rail, the smell of alcohol on their breath combines with the putrid sweet smell of nocturnal Manhattan.

Painting and Buddhism – just as abstraction and spirituality – appear in Martin’s article in addition to his work like two old friends who, unshaven and somewhat dishevelled, flee from colour-field painting’s precious surfaces and esoteric New Age murmurs into the next bar, to down the postmodern chic of the last preview party with a few beers. Martin is not an ironist. But the doubled solitary confinement of a spiritual art in the hallowed halls of the white cube on the one hand, and in the saccharine lotus esotericism on the other, is not for him. To be sure, he stands in the tradition of modern abstract art’s spiritual branch, whose saints, as canonised by our museums, range from Paul Klee, Piet Mondrian, Barnett Newman and many others up to and including Helmut Federle. But the further Martin’s work reaches, the more it extends over and above this canon, in fact takes it to very different social contexts to be discussed here.

»Abstract painting is the dirt that catches the sun,« writes Martin and seeks the aesthetics of the sublime in this world, in the everyday, in popular culture, and in his neighbourhood on Graham Avenue in Brooklyn, where he moved his studio in 1984. Since the early 1990s he has regularly hung canvasses on the facades of buildings on the surrounding streets and leaves them there for weeks. In 2000 he painted a group of large black-light paintings for the Galapagos bar, adjusting it to the ultra-violet light of the night. For a 2005 exhibition poster, he took a photograph on the bank of the East River showing 50 friends gathered around the artist and four of his large-format paintings like a hippie community at a street fair. Particularly large canvasses are painted on the roof of his studio or outdoors on the pasture, where chickens strut across the fresh paint, and rain washes away one or the other picture before it even had the chance to dry. »If everything is futile anyway,« you hear Buddhism saying, »why bother tidying up?«

Where does this gesture come from that seems somewhat coquettishly relaxed at first glance; somewhat idiosyncratic, eclectic, and very literally romantic? What is Martin driving at? What is he offering us that deserves our attention and perhaps even our approval? What does his painting contribute to art history that makes it worthy of assuming a place in it? Why does he paint mushrooms? And what do they have to do with Buddhism? A first quick response: Chris Martin generously builds bridges between cultures that have long proven their peaceful coexistence in the everyday lives of many people, but which have an effect like oil and water on all those people who would prefer that their lives and the world (and art) were systematic – cate-gorised in compartments that ensure that everything is in its proper place. And of all places, he builds these bridges leading from an old consecrated plateau of Western sophistication, namely the abstraction that has long served the United States as a trademark of its rational and spiritual superiority over other ways of life and ideologies.

It is possible that in the process, he is not doing a service to some American identities. This explains why he has heretofore paid scant heed to the aesthetic canon of the (art)political mainstream. Even though, like few others, Martin has the capacity to reconsider one of the great ideological achievements of American history for the present day: the conviction that the solidarity of a person toward the body politic does not depend on his or her religious feelings. The fact that this conviction has fewer followers today than in past decades makes Martin’s oeuvre appear even more politically relevant.

Here, 1995–1996

For 12 years starting in 1992, Chris Martin worked as an art therapist with HIV-positive patients. Their dying is reflected in his series of Death Paintings. Here can be seen as the key work of this group. The drawing of a geometric cube lying on the horizon line guides the viewer’s attention into the depth like a window reveal situated in the middle of 12 square-meter monochromatic black ground. Martin makes programmatic use of one-point perspective, embodiment of the humanist turning point during the European Renaissance. But the fleeing lines in Martin’s painting open no window to a divinely ordained world inhabited by human beings. They describe an interior space in the middle of nothingness, a portal in the void. Here marks an imaginary space at the threshold between this world and the next, a narrow zone between us and death. Here means a spiritual place.

But where is this place, precisely? In answer to this question, Martin shows his renunciation, in terms of content, of the colour-field painting that his pictorial concept nevertheless seems to resemble at first glance – thus also of a guiding aesthetic paradigm of post-war modern art in the West. This renunciation is also evident in his use of one-point perspective, which is so firmly grounded in the pictorial culture of Christian art. Mark Rothko and Barnett Newman, two major proponents of colour-field painting, rejected perspective space and saw immersing one’s sight in a colour space of painting as the gateway to a transcendental experience, which was closer to Jewish culture. Rothko’s subtle depths of colour and Newman’s strict monochromatic areas would directly dissolve the subject’s boundaries, its existence in the here and now before the canvas – also the artists’ reaction to the trauma of the Holocaust. To do so, it was necessary to blot out any and all attachment to the circumstances of the pictures’ environment. In opposition, Martin, who was essentially raised on Pop Art’s critique of abstraction’s purity requirement, virtually welcomed the profane, nearly lapidary character of his canvasses, literally covering them entirely with quick, course brushstrokes of paint. He does not suggest any exclusive dimension of experience that gives his picture surfaces an advantage of some sort over everyday objects as a result of whatever subtle materiality and, unlike Rothko and Newman, does not have to presuppose the »neutrality« of the white cube. As one commentator wrote, Martin’s pictures are as »daily as breakfast.« It is therefore by no means surprising that years after Here, he completely covered some canvasses with pieces of toast or with pillows.

And the horizon line that Martin drew under the central axis? It structures the canvas into a top and bottom, thus suggesting a landscape. In other Death Paintings, stars are additionally painted in the top third of the picture, underscoring the impression of a nocturne. Landscapes at night in fact run like a golden thread through Martin’s oeuvre, for example in a such major work from the 1980s as John Bill Haynes’ House (1989). The window motif and the view into the darkness can also be found here. A band of text traverses the composition, providing a concrete written localisation and point in time for the painting, and that would appear in many others. And particularly large-format pictures such as Lake (2000) were painted after Here. A night-time swim in a lake, the horizon line has moved far above the centre of the painting; the inner pictorial viewpoint is close to the surface of the water. The rising moon and a few stars are rhythmically reflected in the waves. The tranquil sublime grandeur of the experience of nature is transferred to the viewer standing before this nearly 11-meter canvas. The picture’s composition and colours – which still appear in the Death Paintings for the most part as conceptual graphic reductions – now agree with the impression of nature. In his vocabulary of forms, Martin approaches indigenous folk art while thematically taking up the »spiritual landscapes« of American Romantic art that is still so little known in Europe. Lake is deeply rooted in the experience of the North American landscape und in the traditions of its representation.

But with »spiritual landscapes«, a term has been mentioned that concludes the question concerning the spiritual location in Martin’s oeuvre for the time being. Here is not the place of the dissolution of the subject’s boundaries in pure abstraction. Here begins here, literally, in the experience and in the position of a body in space, bound to a specific point in time and to a geographic topography that will increasingly become a social topography over the course of his work. Here is a meditative state with open eyes firmly set on the horizon – and in the case of the Death Paintings – on death as well. Ethical or religious assumptions, of which the history of abstraction has seen many, are not applied in this case. For this alone a debt of gratitude is owed Chris Martin for remaining impervious to any and all religious concepts. And yet, perhaps because of this, he is able to integrate the most diverse spiritual traditions into his paintings in a positive eclectic manner. Those who wish to hold fast to religious notions and their institutionalisation will receive little pleasure from Martin’s pictures. But those who conversely welcome the secularisation of the modern world and nonetheless acknowledge that it has offered the spiritual needs of many people few alternatives other than the capitalist value and commodity fetishism will consider Martin’s position.

Staring into the sun, 2002

Two trips to India in 1983 and 2002 had a crucial influence on Chris Martin’s painting. He produced a larger group of paintings in 2002 that represent a turning point in his oeuvre. Martin now worked with clear, in part garish hues and colour contrasts, finding his way to stable, powerful compositions. Titles like Ganges Sunrise, Sunrise Asi Ghat Varanasi, High Noon at Manikarnika Ghat, and Staring Into The Sun allude to their motifs. Varanasi (Banaras), the city of the god Shiva, is considered Hinduism’s most sacred site. More than a million people come every day and throng to the »ghats,« the cremation sites on the steps leading down to the banks of the River Ganges. According to Hindus, the soul of whomever is cremated here is released from the endless cycle of reincarnation, and thus they entrust the ashes of the deceased to the river. Death is again the focus of this group of works. The images mark a moment at the threshold between life and death. The break of a new day, the rising sun is mirrored in the waves blackened by the ashes at a place that people hope has the power to keep them from returning for another earthly existence.

Staring Into The Sun (2002) exaggerates the reflection of the sunlight into a gaudy yellow and red orange, a colour effect that occurs after looking directly at the sun for a moment. »Staring into the sun – that’s what you’re never supposed to do,« says Chris Martin, meaning the injuries that the retina could otherwise sustain by doing so. Only by looking down can one see the sun, which is reflected in the water indirectly. Another picture with the same title varies the theme. Three sections of canvas measuring a total of ten meters in height and three meters wide that have been pushed together are folded into the space in such a way that two-thirds of the picture lies on the ground, blocking frontal access to the vertical upper portion (Staring Into The Sun, 2002). Its top edge consists of a sunny yellow beam. Blue colour fields of various widths run underneath over a red background that tapers off in three stages toward the lower or front edge of the work.

The three panels address the tiering of the funeral processions and the masses of pilgrims pushing their ways through the city’s narrow streets toward the cremation sites, where the funeral pyres are located. But the composition also resembles a schematic depiction of the retina, the arrangement of rod and cone cells that process the arriving light – or are scorched when they receive too much of it. In the process, Staring Into The Sun interleaves in a remarkable way the physis of visual perception with the topography of the Manikarnika Ghat and thus the finiteness of the body with the finiteness of sight.

Incidentally, reproductions are pasted onto the lower edge of a second version of this three-part painting from 2011, including a picture of Amy Winehouse, who died the same year. Chris Martin dedicated a variation of the motif painted on a single canvas, High Noon at Manikarnika Ghat (2002–2003), to his friend and artist colleague Frank Moore. Moore was an AIDS activist who developed the red solidarity ribbon in 1991 with the Visual AIDS group. He died in 2002. High Noon… is thus turned into a requiem. The dedication is at the bottom right.

Dance, 2006–2008

Text elements, usually brief phrases from sentences, can be found in Martin’s work since the late 1980s. The first dedication of a picture I am aware of dates from 1996, Homage to Alfred and Bill (1982–1996). Martin is referring here to Alfred Jensen, an Abstract Expressionist painter who is less well known in Europe, and the New York painter Bill Jensen. But Martin previously seemed to still be at odds with his forebears – and with himself as well. In an earlier star picture (the seven-pointed star will later become one of Martin’s most popular motifs) entitled I Am Not… (1988–1992) he distances himself from icons of abstraction: »I am not Hilma af Klint,« »I am not Julian« (Schnabel), »I am not Alfred Jensen.« But also: »I am not Chris,« »I am not I.« The sentences are wedged onto a sky-blue background that visually opens up behind a canvas with a star-shape laceration that has been primed in black and sprinkled with gold confetti. But the »I« at the beginning of every sentence paradoxically and almost emblematically confirms, in the middle of the picture, the authorship of the person who is distancing himself. Identity and the ego might be negligible and overcome, as Buddhism aspires to, but the author’s »speaker’s position« remains initially in place.

The distancing from his heroes was later thrown into reverse. From 1996 to the present, Homage to Alfred and Bill was followed by uncounted inscriptions with which Martin pays his respects to colleagues from the world of painting and especially music; some of them famous, others far from the mainstream. Some, like Frank Moore, Michael Jackson, or James Brown, were occasioned by their deaths. Especially beautiful is a series of four small pictures that are all collaged with a pin-up girl greeting Alfred Jensen: Good Morning Alfred Jensen, Good Morning! (2005–2007). Good Evening Alfred Jensen, Good Evening! (2007). With his homage practice, Martin breaks through the competiveness nature and innovative thinking so typical of contemporary art. Here, too, he distances himself from modernist doctrines. He does not seem interested in originality or authenticity, but rather in extensive nets of inner and outer pictorial contexts that he throws out ever more generously. In the process, he continually incorporates new cultural, social, and political themes by means of references supplemented by collage techniques. His store of material is also growing, becoming lavish and scurrilous on occasion.

Martin’s homage practice reached its preliminary peak in Dance (2006–2008), as did his networking of diverse cultural contexts. Nine names are now placed in a row at the foot of the canvas, which is 3.4 meters high and 6.1 meters wide. Kurtis Blow, Grandmaster Flash, Kool Moe Dee, and other 1970s pioneers and eighties icons of hip-hop and rap comprise the entire base of the image. They popularised the urban ghetto recitative, invented DJing and sampling – postmodern cultural techniques. The row of names also includes the Swedish painter, spiritualist, and anthroposophist Hilma af Klint and Alfred Jensen again … in addition to his lesser-known contemporaries Paul Feeley and Myron Stout. Martin’s large-scale composition places this multiple dedication against the backdrop of a social frame of reference. A portrait of each of the cited protagonists is additionally pasted onto the left edge of the picture like a small devotional image. Some of the people are allocated a collaged object: (plastic) marijuana leaves, coins, and dollar bills, vinyl records, newspaper articles, feathers, and pills. Alfred Jensen is given a shell. A banana peel has also been stapled to the canvas and painted black – a salutation to Andy Warhol and Pop Art that Martin has repeated on numerous canvasses.

One could think here of voodoo practices or summoning the dead with objects from their possession. While the title Dance and the buoyant vocabulary of forms indicate an homage to Henri Matisse – whose famous equally large-format painting La Danse (1909/1910) depicts five joyously moving women and was also painted as a sort of twin to La Musique (1910) – Martin’s painting appears as a dance of death, particularly in the context of his work. All the cited painters are deceased. The musicians, on the other hand, are still living. Matisse’s painting is pioneering in formal terms for its reduction down to three colours, with which the interior forms are filled in almost monochromatically. Martin employs the same formal principle. Six sweeping, regularly curved, completely white forms that, seen anthropomorphically, could doubtlessly recall gyrating hips, are encompassed within a monochromatic black field. Their edges are outlined in red, blue, and yellow. In the viewer’s perception, however, the forms seem to rest less on the dark ground than behind it, as if the canvas primed in black and opened six-fold in generous sweeps offers a glimpse of a white light space behind it, whose dimensions remain indeterminable.

Martin’s canvas again functions as a threshold between a worldly, in this case particularly socially and culturally definable place, and an intangible dimension that can in turn be characterised as spiritual. With their pointy ends, the white compartments of form are fitted in between the top and bottom edges of the work like Tibetan prayer wheels in their shrine. That such wheels, when turned, spin on their own axes like the row of dancers in Matisse’s painting, reaffirms the comparison between the pictures. But especially the lower base of Martin’s winding forms has been given much significance, while in Dance, as well as in all comparable paintings, the upper edge of the picture assists in containing the composition but is itself never addressed. A »top« – virtually required by Christian iconography and constantly exposed both symbolically and compositionally – does not exist in Martin’s work. To the extent that his compositions have a formal and energetic base, it is at the bottom, on the ground and absolutely in the dirt, which, as Chris Martin and the title of this
essay says, captures the sun.

Untitled, 2005

Pictures with such pulsating forms as in Dance form the largest and most reproduced group of works in Chris Martin’s oeuvre. With very few deviations, Untitled from 1988 already follows the same compositional principles. I wish to discuss this group in more detail because numerous individual examples enable a further analogy that is in turn not unfamiliar to Buddhism and closely affiliated especially with Tantric practice. As an example, I would like to discuss a small painting on cardboard, Untitled (2005).

Three forms simultaneously wind their way upward here from the lower edge of the picture, standing out black against a fiery red background. They extend up like flickering tongues of flame, each of them surrounding a different number of more or less white dots: five at the left, fourteen in the middle and seven at the right. Against the backdrop of Martin’s reception of Buddhism, it makes sense to link this energetic picture to Kundalini power. Tantric writings use the Sanskrit term Kundalini to describe the potential in the human being that comes closest to the energy of the earth, the material, and rests like a coiled snake at the base of the spine in the lowest chakra. The most elementary of all human forces can be awakened from there through yoga practices, meditation, and Tantric sexuality, like a fire that climbs up the spine and breaks through one chakra after the other (the white dots in Martin’s picture) to ultimately combine via the crown chakra at the top of the head with the cosmic, spiritual energy – which corresponds to the state of spiritual transformation, and enlightenment.

Not only in Indian Tantra but in Europe as well, a rising snake is one of the oldest symbols of life-giving force. Since Classical antiquity, it can been found as the symbol of medicine and pharmacology in the rod of Asclepius, and even in Gustav Klimt’s famed painting The Medicine (1900–1907), a golden snake uncoils in the same way from the base of the spine as in classic Tantric representations. Even in the Old Testament, God sent out fiery serpents against the people of Israel to punish their sins with its bite, which Moses in turn healed with the »brazen serpent« of enlightenment.

The fact that Martin, as described above, compositionally always leaves this moment of enlightenment blank underscores the fact that he does not proceed from any fixed spiritual principle, much less from concrete religious concepts which he would care enough about to represent. Admittedly, Untitled depicts the row of the chakras and their connections to each other in a virtually schematic manner by means of the snake or flame-like form at the left. (However, the first chakra is identical to the lower edge of the picture, the seventh with the upper edge – which the white line that only extends from the first to the sixth chakra does not break through and thus fails to overcome its connection to the material world, symbolised by a horizon line.) At the same time, the arrangement of the white dots in the two black forms further to the right reveals an almost ironic handling of the energy metaphor, to the extent that they make a particularly uncoordinated bubbling impression (and playfully overstep the horizon in the process!).

This brings us to Martin’s mushroom pictures. The earliest I know of dates to 1980 (Psilocybin). The motif still recurs regularly in Martin’s work today. Like the Kundalini snake, Martin’s mushrooms always stand on the lower edge of the picture, growing completely from the ground, as expected. As in Untitled, five orange red dots run up the stem of a mushroom to its cap in Mushrooms (2004–2008). Airily sprayed, white spots are distributed above like spores in a landscape. Another group of mushrooms is connected with an rhizomatic array of lines. Variously coloured dots bead and leap across the whole picture, and titles like Psilocybin leave no doubt about what kind of mushrooms are involved and where the shimmering impression of perception comes from. After all, its active ingredient is greatly heightening the experience of lights, colours, and contrasts and causing them to vibrate. As with LSD, the boundaries of consciousness seem dissolved. And like in Tantra, the self merges with its surroundings.

And if alchemistic symbolism has always assumed a central role in Martin’s work (numerology, anagrams, colour theory), it likewise alludes to alchemistic knowledge of the psychological effects of chemical substances and thus optimally suited to Martin’s apparent interest in mind-expanding drugs. Enlightenment as a trip. Mushrooms grow as high as trees in Big Glitter Painting (2009–2010) and shine, together with a cloud, neon yellow and orange against a night sky that glistens like cocaine powder. The »spiritual landscapes« motif is repeated here this time in the psychedelic merger of nature and the psyche, of the inner and outer landscape.

Ain’t it funky, 2003–2010

Ever since the horizon line was programmatically introduced in Here in 1986, it has established different perspectives of sight as well as of meaning. The horizon lines lay higher in the picture at times, at other times lower, but over the years they are largely located at the lower edge of the picture where as painted lines they provide a grip on reality in the shape of mushrooms, Kundalini snakes, and other compositions. As could be seen in Dance, they often place Martin’s paintings firmly on the feet of concrete cultural and social references that the artist feels close to, thinks about, or admires. He integrates them into the energetic context his pictures invoke with an unconventional, thoroughly profane magic.

References to music have dramatically increased in Martin’s work since 2006. The artist has said that James Brown’s death moved him in a way that even he found surprising. Martin grew up in Washington, D.C. as the child of an elitist white family in a Georgetown neighbourhood that now has so many alarm systems and security patrols that Martin describes it as particularly dangerous for that very reason. The traditionally strong black soul and funk culture in Washington meant that the young Martin could broaden his middle-class horizon, and the social emancipatory movements of rap and hip-hop became an alternative culture to his own heritage. In Rev. Al In Mourning (2006–2007), a newspaper clipping surrounded by white radiates from the middle of a canvas that has been coarsely painted in black. The clipping shows James Brown and the civil rights activist Reverend Al Sharpton leaving the White House in 1982. Together they wanted to convince President Ronald Reagan to declare Martin Luther King Jr.’s birthday a national holiday. Reverend Al wears black mourning clothes.

Martin has dedicated numerous pictures to James Brown since 2006, one of the most beautiful of which is Farewell Godfather of Soul… (2007). Reproduced twice from an album cover, Brown’s face, with a lightning bolt on his chest, is submerged in the depths of a black mass of oil paint, seconded by two delicate clouds on a narrow strip of blue sky. The fusion of spiritual symbolism and political themes is likewise explicit in Motown Music and the Astral Plane (2007–2008). Motown, the legendary Detroit album label, is considered the epitome of black emancipation through music. Two-thirds of the canvas has been covered with seven records by James Brown and Michael Jackson. Shimmering colourful lines with which, like in Mushrooms, the LPs are connected rhizomatically, veer toward a book under plastic foil at the top of the picture, which bears the title The Astral Plane. First published in 1895, the book’s author Charles Webster Leadbeater provides an introduction to theosophical thought that he, openly racist, regards accessible only to whites. Brown and Jackson are bundling their energy in order, so it seems, to banish this book and shoot it into orbit beyond the edge of the picture.

In Ain’t It Funky (2003–2010) – the title quotes James Brown’s 1970 album of the same name – connecting lines can be found between seven LPs. But these are supplemented by collaged pictures of
ritual sites, such as temples, and ritual acts. Reproductions of antique vases, a forest fire, a post-Cubist painting by Pablo Picasso (Three Musicians, 1921) and other such things can be seen on the edge of the picture. These reference pictures bulge on all sides from the edge of the canvas on their dramatically coloured underpainting, like a curtain toward the centre of the picture primed in black, making it appear like a theatrically staged scene. Tilted from the vertical to the horizontal, the canvas could be turned at any time into a dance floor on which the individual steps are predetermined, as in a ritual choreography. While the horizon line at the bottom is still present, Martin encompasses the energetic constellation in the middle with a no less complex subplot that circulates around the whole picture. In formal terms, the pictorial occurrence is excessive, the contrasts are hard, the brushstrokes coarse.

Based on West African traditions, James Brown’s funk music was in fact conceived with ecstatic, ritualistic dance experiences in mind. This often not only blurred the boundary between the auditorium and stage but also suspended corporeal perception in the flow of the music, animating a rhythmic merger of the self with its exterior. In Ain’t It Funky, Martin again very unmistakably underscores his pursuit of spiritual dynamics amidst cultural practices, objects, and symbols from diverse provenances. His pictures bind them together without hierarchies and amidst a social world that his painting feels beholden to, sometimes devoutly, sometimes solidarily, sometimes critically. He recently intensely seized on the art of the so-called self-taught artists from the southern United States, who are – less politically correctly – also called outsider artists. They live on the outskirts of America’s affluent society and with their rubbish make sculptures and pictures that approach African sculpture and cult objects. Martin attaches greater significance to that which is dismissed as »folklore« by the upper echelon of aesthetics than to the canonised celebrations of so-called high culture.

The transitory nature of the moment, of the body, of identity, the fleetingness of existence at the threshold of death, the nothingness of the material, are the great themes in Martin’s oeuvre. But for me, the most important thing is that he never complains about this finiteness, affirming it instead. To be sure, this occurs more reverentially in his early works than in his later paintings in which the respect for the thematic is not lost, but comprehended less generally and especially increasingly less abstract. I have chosen the term »spiritual abstraction« for the title of this essay, and by this I primarily mean the term for a genre of painting that since Hilma af Klint has devoted itself to the representation of metaphysical contents with non-representational means. The fact is – and that is what I am trying to demonstrate – that Martin’s paintings are highly grounded in the physis, in nature, sometimes with almost comic-like figurativeness, and they have the great advantage of not subjugating themselves to any metaphysical concept. They stand with both feet planted firmly on the social reality of their author who, despite being the subject of his work, hardly brings himself into play.

In Martin’s art, spirituality first and foremost has an empathic, in fact solidary character. In 2008, Chris Martin completed a picture that bears an inscription on the lower edge reading »A painting for the protection of Amy Winehouse« (For Amy Winehouse, 2004–2008). Martin draped a protective wall made out Kleenex tissues/fabric around a portrait of the singer who suffered from alcohol and drug addiction, encircling it with goggle eyes symbolising the public’s greedy glances. He pasted a candy cane for her onto the picture. After Winehouse’s death in 2011, it appears like a funerary object.

Schmutz, der die Sonne fängt. Chris Martins sozialer Horizont einer spirituellen Abstraktion
Text by Alexander Koch

First published in: Gregor Jansen: Chris Martin, Staring Into The Sun, Kunsthalle Düsseldorf, Verlag der Buchhandlung Walther König, Düsseldorf, 2011

Malerei und Buddhismus sind gute Kumpel. Wenn sie durch New Yorker Galerien und Kneipen ziehen, sinniert Malerei regelmäßig über den Unterschied zwischen guten und schlechten Bildern – und Buddhismus entgegnet mit alten tibetischen Weisheiten, an denen Malereis Ambitionen abperlen wie der Regen an den Ölflecken auf dem Asphalt. Dreck knirscht unter ihren Schuhen, wenn Chris Martin Malerei und Buddhismus durch die Straßen von Chelsea schickt. Und während die beiden in seinem Artikel „Buddhism, Landscape and the absolute Truth about Abstract Painting“ für die Zeitschrift Brooklyn Rail launig über das Wesen der Kunst streiten, mischen sich ihre Alkoholfahnen unter den fauligen, süßlichen Geruch des nächtlichen Manhattan.

Malerei und Buddhismus – ebenso wie Abstraktion und Spiritualität – erscheinen in Martins Artikel und auch in seinem Werk als ein altes Freundespaar, das unrasiert und leicht zerzaust vor den preziösen Oberflächen der Farbfeldmalerei und dem esoterischen Raunen des New Age in die nächste Bar flüchtet, um dort den postmodernen Chic der letzten Vernissageparty mit ein paar Bieren runterzuspülen. Martin ist kein Ironiker. Aber die doppelte Isolationshaft einer spirituellen Kunst in den heiligen Hallen des White Cube einerseits und in weichgespülter Lotus-Esoterik anderseits ist nicht seine Sache. Sicher, er stellt sich in eine Linie mit dem spirituellen Zweig innerhalb der modernen Abstraktion, der sich mit Künstlern wie Paul Klee, Piet Mondrian, Barnett Newman und vielen anderen bis hin zu Helmut Federle museal kanonisiert findet. Doch je weiter sein Werk reicht, desto weiter greift es über diesen Kanon hinaus, ja: zieht ihn hinüber in ganz andere soziale Zusammenhänge, die hier zu erörtern sind.

„Malerei ist der Schmutz, der die Sonne fängt“, schreibt Martin und sucht die Ästhetik des Erhabenen im Dies­seits, im Alltag, in der Populärkultur und in seiner Nachbarschaft an der Graham Avenue in Brooklyn, wo er 1984 sein Atelier bezog. In den umliegenden Straßenzügen hängt er seit 2000 immer wieder Leinwände an Häuserfassaden, wo er sie wochenlang belässt. 2003 malt er wandfüllende Gemälde für die Galapagos-Bar und stimmt sie auf das nächtliche Schwarzlicht ab. Für ein Ausstellungsplakat nimmt er 2004 am Ufer des East River ein Foto auf, auf dem sich 50 Freunde um den Künstler und vier seiner großformatigen Bilder versammeln wie eine Hippie-Community beim Straßenfest. Besonders große Leinwände malt er auf dem Dach seines Ateliers oder draußen auf der Wiese, wo Hühner über die frische Farbe laufen und der Regen manches Bild wieder aus­wäscht, ehe es trocknet. „Es ist eh alles nichtig“, hört man Buddhismus sagen, „warum also aufräumen?“

Woher kommt dieser Gestus, der auf den ersten Blick etwas kokett entspannt erscheint, etwas idiosynkratisch, eklektizistisch und im ganzen Wortsinn: romantisch? Worauf will Martin hinaus? Was bietet er an, das unsere Aufmerksamkeit und eventuell unsere Zustimmung lohnt? Was fügt seine Malerei der Kunstgeschichte hinzu, so dass ihr darin ein Platz zustünde? Warum malt er Pilze? Und was haben die mit Buddhismus zu tun? Eine erste, schnelle Antwort: Chris Martin baut freizügig Brücken zwischen Kulturen, die ihre friedliche Koexistenz im Alltag vieler Menschen längst bewiesen haben, aber wie Öl und Wasser auf all jene Leute wirken, die ihr Leben und die Welt (und die Kunst) gerne systematisch hätten ­– eingeteilt in Kompartimente, die ihnen versichern, dass jedes Ding an einen rechten Platz gehört. Und er baut diese Brücken ausgerechnet von einem alten, geweihten Hochplateau westlicher Kultiviertheit aus, der Abstraktion, die den Vereinigten Staaten so lange als Signatur ihrer rationalen und spirituellen Überlegenheit gegenüber anderen Lebensweisen und Ideologien gedient hat.

Manchen US-amerikanischen Identitäten mag er damit keinen Dienst tun. So erklärt sich, dass er am ästhe­tischen Kanon des (kunst)politischen Mainstream bislang vorbeilief. Dabei hat Martins Werk es wie nur wenige verstanden, eine der großen ideologischen Errungenschaften der US-Geschichte für die Gegenwart weiterzuden­ken: Dass nämlich die Solidarität eines Menschen gegenüber seinem Gemeinwesen unabhängig davon ist, welche re­ligiösen Gefühle er hat. Dass diese Unterscheidung heute vielfach annulliert wird, lässt Martins Werk auch politisch um so relevanter erscheinen.

HERE, 1995-1996

20 Jahre lang, ab 1992, arbeitete Chris Martin als Kunsttherapeut mit HIV-infizierten, meist jungen Patienten. In der Reihe der „Death Paintings“ spiegelt sich ihr Sterben. „Here“ kann als Schlüsselwerk dieser Reihe gelten. Auf einem zwölf Quadratmeter großen, monochrom schwarzen Fond steht mittig die Zeichnung eines geome­trischen Kubus, der auf einer Horizontlinie ruht und den Blick wie eine Fensterlaibung in die Tiefe führt. Programmatisch setzt Martin die Zentralperspektive ein, Inbegriff der humanistischen Wende in der europäischen Renaissance. Aber die fliehenden Linien in Martins Bild öffnen kein Fenster zu einer gottge­wollten und von Menschen bewohnten Welt. Sie zeichnen einen Binnenraum mitten im Nichts, ein Portal in die Leere. „Here“ markiert einen imaginären Raum auf der Schwelle zwischen Diesseits und Jenseits, eine schmale Zone zwischen uns und dem Tod. „Here“ meint einen spirituellen Ort.

Aber wo genau liegt dieser Ort? In der Antwort auf diese Frage zeigt sich Martins inhaltliche Abkehr von der Farbfeldmalerei, der sein Bildkonzept auf den ersten Blick doch zu ähneln scheint – und damit von einem ästhetischen Leitparadigma der westlichen Nachkriegsmoderne. Auch in der Verwendung der fest in der christlichen Bildkultur verankerten Zentralperspektive zeigt sich diese Abkehr. Mark Rothko und Barnett Newman, zwei Hauptvertreter des „Colour Field Painting“, sahen die Versenkung des Blicks in einen Farbraum der Malerei, der den perspe­ktivischen Raum überwand, als Tor zu einer transzendentalen Erfahrung, die jüdischer Kultur näherstand. Die subtilen Farbtiefen Rothkos und die streng monochromen Flächen Newmans sollten das Subjekt, seine Existenz im Hier und Jetzt vor der Leinwand, unmittelbar entgrenzen – auch eine Reaktion der Künstler auf das Trauma des Holocaust. Dazu war es erforderlich, jede Anhaftung an die Gegebenheiten der Lebenswelt aus den Bildern zu tilgen. Martin, der die Kritik der Pop Art am ästhetischen Reinheitsgebot der Abstraktion quasi schon in die Wiege gelegt bekam, begrüßt dagegen geradezu den profanen, ja lapidaren Charakter seiner Leinwand und malt sie mit schnellen, groben Pinselstrichen buchstäblich zu. Er suggeriert keinerlei exklusive Erfahrungsdimension, die seine Bildoberflächen aufgr­und irgendeiner subtilen Materialität Alltagsobjekten voraushätten, und muss anders als Rothko und Newman auch nicht die „Neutralität“ des White Cube voraussetzen. Martins Bilder sind, wie ein Kommentator schrieb, „as daily as breakfast“, so alltäglich wie das Frühstück. Dass er Jahre nach „Here“ einige Leinwände vollflächig mit Toastbroten oder Kopfkissen bedeckt, überrascht also nicht.

Und die Horizontlinie, die Martin unterhalb der Mittelachse zieht? Sie gliedert die Leinwand in Oben und Unten und sug­geriert so eine Landschaft. In anderen „Death Paintings“ finden sich zudem Sterne ins obere Bilddrittel gemalt und verstärken die Anmutung eines Nachtstücks. Tatsächlich ziehen sich nächtliche Landschaften wie ein roter Faden durch Martins Werk. So in einem Hauptwerk der Achtzigerjahre, „John Bill Haynes' Haus“. Auch hier finden sich das Fenstermotiv und der Blick ins Dunkel. Ein Textband durchzieht die Kom­position und nennt schriftlich einen konkreten Ort und Zeipunkt für das Gemälde, so wie es noch viele weitere tun werden. Und bald nach „Here“ entstehen besonders großformatige Bilder wie „Lake“ (2000): Ein nächtliches Bad in einem See, die Horizontlinie ist weit oberhalb der Bildmitte gerückt, der bildinterne Be­trachterstandpunkt liegt nahe der Wasseroberfläche. Der aufgehende Mond und einzelne Sterne spiegeln sich rhythmisch in den Wellen. Die stille, erhabene Größe dieser Naturerfahrung überträgt sich auf die Betrachter vor der fast elf Meter langen Leinwand. Komposition und Farbgebung des Bildes – die in den „Death Paintings“ noch als primär konzeptionelle, grafische Reduktion erschien – deckt sich nun mit dem Natureindruck. Martin nähert sich in seiner Formensprache der indigenen Volkskunst, während er thematisch die „Spiritual Landscapes“ der in Europa noch immer wenig bekannten US-amerikanischen Romantik aufgreift. „Lake“ ist tief verwurzelt in der Erfahrung der nordamerikanischen Landschaft und in den Traditionen ihrer Darstellung.

Mit „Spiritual Landscapes“ aber ist ein Stichwort gefallen, das die Frage nach dem spirituellen Ort in Martins Werk fürs Erste abschließt. „Here“ ist kein Ort der Entgrenzung des Subjekts in reiner Abstraktion. „Here“ beginnt hier, buch­stäblich, in der Erfahrung und im Standpunkt eines Körpers im Raum, gebunden an einen Zeitpunkt und an eine geografische Topografie, die im Werkverlauf zunehmend eine soziale Topografie werden wird. „Here“ ist ein meditativer Zustand mit offenen Augen, den Horizont – und im Falle der „Death Paintings“ auch den Tod – fest im Blick. Ethisch-religiöse Konzepte, von denen die Geschichte der Abstraktion so viele gesehen hat, braucht es dazu nicht. Allein dafür ist Chris Martin schon zu danken: dass er gegenüber jeglichen religiösen Vorstellungen unempfindlich bleibt und dennoch – beziehungsweise: gerade deshalb – in der Lage ist, verschiedenste spiri­tuelle Traditionslinien positiv eklektizistisch in seine Malerei zu integrieren. Wer an religiösen Vorstellungen und an ihrer Institutionalisierung spiritueller Erfahrung festhalten will, wird an Martins Bildern wenig Freude haben. Wer hingegen die Säkularisierung der modernen Welt begrüßt und dennoch anerkennt, dass sie dem spirituel­len Bedürfnis vieler Menschen kaum andere Alternativen als den kapitalistischen Wert- und Warenfetischismus angeboten hat, wird Martins Position bedenken.

STARING INTO THE SUN, 2002

Zwei Indienreisen, 1983 und 2002, haben Chris Martins Malerei entscheidend geprägt. 2002 entsteht eine größere Gruppe von Bildern, die eine Wende im Werk darstellen. Martin arbeitet nun mit klaren, teils grellen Tönen und Farbkontrasten und findet zu stabilen, mächtigen Kompositionen. Titel wie „Ganges Sunrise“, „Sun­rise Asi Ghat Varanasi“, „High Noon at Manikarnika Ghat“ und „Staring Into The Sun“ deuten auf deren Motive. Varanasi (Bengasi), die Stadt des Gottes Shiva, gilt als wichtigstes Heiligtum des Hinduismus. Täglich kommen rund eine Million Menschen und drängen zu den „Ghats“, den Krematorien an den Uferterrassen des Ganges. Wessen Leichnam hier verbrannt wird, dem bleibt die Wiedergeburt erspart, sagen die Hindus und übergeben die Asche der Verstorbenen dem Fluss. Erneut ist der Tod das Kernthema der Werkgruppe. Und wieder marki­eren die Bilder einen Moment an der Schwelle zwischen Werden und Vergehen. Am Anbruch eines neuen Tages spiegelt sich die aufgehende Sonne in den von Asche geschwärzten Wellen an einem Ort, von dem die Menschen hoffen, er habe die Macht, sie vor der Rückkehr in ein weiteres irdisches Leben zu bewahren.

„Staring Into The Sun“ (2002) übersteigert die Reflexion des Sonnenlichts in grellem Gelb und Rotorange – ein Farbeffekt, wie er bei einem kurzen, direkten Blick hinauf zur Sonne eintritt. „Staring into the sun - that‘s what you’re supposed to never do“, sagt Chris Martin auf Anfrage und meint damit die Zer­störung der Netzhaut, die andernfalls droht. Nur der gesenkte Blick nach unten erlaubt es, die Sonne, die sich im Wasser spiegelt, indirekt zu sehen. Ein weiteres Bild gleichen Titels variiert das Thema. Drei zusammengeschobene Leinwandflächen von insgesamt zehn Metern Länge und drei Metern Breite sind in den Raum geklappt, so dass zwei Drittel des Bildes am Boden liegen und eine frontale Annäherung an die vertikale Abschlusstafel verstellen. Deren obere Bildkante besteht aus einem sonnengelben Balken (höher kann der Horizont in einem Bild nicht liegen). Darunter verlaufen über einem roten Bildgrund unterschiedlich breite, blaue Farbfelder, die sich in drei Etappen zur Bildunter- beziehungsweise Vorderkante hin verjüngen.

„Staring Into The Sun“ (2002) greift die Staffelung der Leichenzüge und der Pilgermengen auf, die sich durch die engen Gassen der Stadt zu den Krematorien drängen, wo die Scheiterhaufen stehen. Die Komposition gleicht aber auch einer schematischen Darstellung der Netzhaut, der Anordnung von Stäbchen und Zäpfchen (Rot, Blau, Grün), die das eintreffende Licht verarbeiten - oder von ihm versengt werden, wenn sie zuviel davon abbekommen. „Staring Into The Sun“ verschränkt dabei auf bemerkenswerte Weise die Physis der visuellen Wahrnehmung mit der Topografie des Manikarnika Ghat, und damit die Endlichkeit des Körpers mit der Endlichkeit des Blicks.

In einer zweiten Fassung des dreiteiligen Bildes von 2011 sind an dessen Unterkante übrigens Reproduktionen eingeklebt, u.a. ein Bild der im gleichen Jahr verstorbenen Amy Winehouse. Eine Variation des Motivs auf einer einzelnen Leinwand, „High Noon at Manikarnika Ghat“ (2002-2003), hat Chris Martin seinem Freund und Künstlerkollegen Frank Moore gewidmet. Moore war AIDS-Aktivist und entwickelte 1991 mit der Gruppe Visual AIDS die Solidaritätsschleife „Red Ribbon“. Er starb 2002. „High Noon...“ wird so zum Requiem. Die Widmung steht unten rechts.

DANCE, 2006-2008

Eingeschriebene Texte finden sich im Werk Martins seit Ende der Achtzigerjahre, meist in kurzen Satzformeln. Die erste mir bekannte Widmung eines Bildes stammt von 1996, „Homage to Alfred and Bill“ (1982-1996). Gemeint sind Alfred Jensen, einer der in Europa weniger berühmten Vertreter des Abstrakten Expres­sionismus, und der New Yorker Maler Bill Jensen. Zuvor aber scheint Martin noch mit seinen Vorbildern zu hadern, ebenso wie mit sich selbst. In einem frühen Sternbild (später wird der siebenzackige Stern eines von Martins populärsten Motiven werden) mit dem Titel „I Am Not...“ (1988-1992) grenzt er sich von Ikonen der Abstraktion ab: „I am not Hilma Af Klint“, „I am not Julian“ (Schnabel), „I am not Alfred Jensen“. Aber auch: „I am not Chris“, „I am not I“. Die Sätze stehen eingezwängt auf einem himmelblauen Grund, der sich optisch hinter einer schwarz grundierten und mit Ruhmesgold bestäubten, sternförmig aufgerissenen Leinwand öffnet. Aber das „I“ an jedem Satzbeginn bestätigt in der Bildmitte paradoxerweise und geradezu emblematisch die Autorschaft desjenigen, der sich da distanziert. Die Identität, das Ego, mag nichtig und überwindbar sein – wonach der Buddhismus strebt – die Sprecherposition eines Autors bleibt aber zunächst einmal bestehen.

Die Distanzierung von seinen Heroen verkehrt sich später ins Gegenteil. Auf „Homage to Alfred and Bill“ folgen von 1996 bis heute unzählige Inschriften, mit denen Chris Martin Künstlerkolleginnen und -kollegen aus der Malerei und vor allem aus der Musik seine Reverenz erweist. Berühmtheiten ebenso wie solchen, die neben dem Mainstream lagen und liegen. Manchmal, wie bei Frank Moore, Michael Jackson oder James Brown anlässlich ihres Todes. Besonders schön ist eine Reihe von vier kleinen Bildern, allesamt mit einem eincollagierten Pin-Up-Girl versehen, die Alfred Jensen zum Morgen und zum Abend grüßen: „Good Morning Alfred Jensen, Good Morning!“ (2007). „Good Evening Alfred Jensen, Good Evening!“ (2007).

Mit seiner Hommage-Praxis durchbricht Martin das für die zeitgenössische Kunst so typische Konkurrenz- und Innovationsdenken. Auch diesbezüglich löst er sich aus der modernistischen Doktrin. Weder Originalität noch Au­thentizität scheinen ihn zu interessieren, wohl aber weitläufige Netze bildinterner und -externer Kontexte, die er immer großzügiger auswirft. Dabei bindet er über die Referenzen, ergänzt durch Collagetechniken, immer neue kulturelle, soziale und politische Themen ein. Auch sein Materialfundus wächst und wird bisweilen üppig und skurril.

Mit „Dance“ (2006-2008) erreicht Chris Martins Hommage-Praxis dann einen vorläufigen Höhepunkt. Ebenso seine Vernetzung diverser kultureller Kontexte. Am Fuß der 3,4 Meter hohen und 6,1 Meter breiten Leinwand finden sich gleich neun Namen aufgereiht. Sie bestimmen die gesamte Basis des Bildes. Kurtis Blow, Grandmaster Flash, Kool Moe Dee und andere sind 70er-Jahre-Pioniere und 80er-Jahre-Ikonen des Hip-Hop und des Rap. Sie machten den Sprechgesang aus den Großstadtghettos populär, erfanden das DJ-ing und das Sampling − Kulturtechniken der Postmoderne. Weiter umfasst die Namensreihe die schwed­ische Malerin, Spiritistin und Anthroposophin Hilma af Klint, erneut Alfred Jensen sowie dessen weni­ger bekannte Zeitgenossen Paul Feeley und Myron Stout. Diese multiple Widmung stellt Martins großflächige Komposition auf das Fundament eines sozialen Bezugsrahmens. Von jedem der zitierten Protagonisten findet sich zudem ein Porträt an den linken Bildrand geklebt wie ein kleines Andachtsbild. Manchen Personen ist ein eincollagiertes Objekt beigegeben: Marihuanablätter (aus Plastik), Geldstücke und Dollarnoten, Schallplatten und Zeitungsartikel, Federn und Tabletten. Alfred Jensen bekommt eine Muschel. Auch eine Bananenschale ist an die Leinwand getackert und schwarz übermalt - ein Gruß an Warhol und die Pop Art, den Martin auf mehreren Leinwänden wiederholt.

Man mag an Voodoo-Praxen denken oder an die Beschwörung Toter mithilfe von Objekten aus ihrem Besitz. Ist „Dance“ dem Titel und der beschwingten Formensprache nach eine Hommage an Matisse – dessen berühmtes, ebenfalls großformatiges Bild „La Danse“ (1909/1910) fünf Frauen in lebensfroher Bewegung zeigt und das im Doppelpack mit „La Musique“ (1910) entstand – so erscheint Martins Gemälde zumal im Zusammenhang seines Werkes als Totentanz. Alle zitierten Malerinnen und Maler sind verblichen, die Musiker hingegen noch nicht. Formal gilt an Matisse‘ Bild die Reduktion auf drei Farben wegweisend, welche die Binnenformen nahezu monochrom ausfüllen (Rot für die Körper, Blau für den Himmel und Grün für das Gras). Das gleiche formale Prinzip findet sich bei Martin. Sechs voll­flächig weiße, in regelmäßigen Kurven geschwungene Formen, die anthropomorph gedeutet durchaus an schwingende Hüften denken lassen, sind eingefasst in monochromes Schwarz. An ihren Rändern sind sie mit roten, blauen und gelben Linien gefasst. In der Wahrnehmung scheinen sie dadurch weni­ger auf dem dunklen Fonds zu liegen als vielmehr dahinter, so als gäbe die sich sechsfach in großzü­gigen Schwüngen öffnende, schwarz grundierte Leinwand den Blick auf einen hinter ihr liegenden weißen Lichtraum frei, dessen Ausmaß unbestimmbar bleibt.

Ein weiteres Mal fungiert Chris Martins Leinwand als Schwelle zwischen einem diesseitigen, in die­sem Fall vor allem sozial und kulturell bestimmbaren Ort, und einer nicht zu greifenden, wiederum als spirituell zu bezeichnenden Dimension. Mit ihren spitzen Enden sind die weißen Formkompartimente zwischen Bildunterkante und -oberkante eingepasst wie tibetische Gebetsmühlen in ihren Schrein. Dass sich solche Mühlen, stößt man sie an, um die eigene Achse drehen wie der Reigen von Tänzerinnen bei Matisse, macht den Bildvergleich nochmals evident. Vor allem der unteren Basis von Martins schlängelnden Formen kommt aber zentrale Bedeutung zu – während in „Dance“ wie in allen seiner vergleichbaren Gemälde die Bildoberkante zwar die Komposition mit hält, nie aber selbst thematisch wird. Ein „Oben“, das etwa die christliche Ikonografie im Vergleich geradezu vorausge­setzt und stets symbolisch wie kompositorisch exponiert hat, gibt es bei Martin nicht. Sofern seine Kompositionen eine formale und energetische Basis haben, liegt sie unten, am Boden und durchaus auch im Schmutz, von dem Chris Martin und der Titel dieses Essays sagen, dass er die Sonne fängt.

UNTITLED, 2005

Bilder mit solch schwingenden Formen wie in „Dance“ bilden die größte, zumindest die am meisten reproduzierte Gruppe von Werken aus Chris Martins Œuvre. Bereits „Untitled“ aus dem Jahr 1988, folgt mit wenigen Abweichungen dem exakt gleichen Kompositionsprinzip. Ich will auf diese Werkgruppe noch näher eingehen, weil sie anlässlich zahlreicher Einzelbeispiele eine weit­ere, wiederum dem Buddhismus nicht unvertraute und vor allem der tantrischen Praxis nahestehende Analogie erlaubt. Als Beispiel ziehe ich eine kleine Malerei auf Pappkarton heran, „Untitled“ (2005).

Simultan schlängeln sich dort drei Formen von der Bildunterkante nach oben und heben sich dabei schwarz gegen einen feurig orangeroten Hintergrund ab. Sie recken sich wie züngelnde Flammen zur Bildo­berkante und fassen dabei eine je verschiedene Zahl mehr oder weniger weißer Punkte: links fünf, in der Mitte vierzehn, rechts sieben. Vor dem Hintergrund von Martins Buddhismus-Rezeption macht es Sinn, dieses energetische Bild mit der Kundalini-Kraft in Verbindung zu bringen. Mit dem Sanskrit-Begriff „Kundalini“ beschreiben tantrische Schriften dasjenige Potenzial im Menschen, das der Erdenergie, der Materie, am nächsten ist und am Ende der Wirbelsäule im untersten Chakra ruht wie eine zusam­mengerollte Schlange. Von dort kann die elementarste aller menschlichen Kräfte, durch Yogi-Praxen, durch Meditation und durch tantrische Sexualität geweckt, wie ein Feuer die Wirbelsäule emporstei­gen und Chakra nach Chakra durchbrechen (die weißen Punkte in Martins Bild), um sich schließlich über das Chronchakra am Scheitel des Kopfes mit der kosmischen, spirituellen Energie zu verbinden – was dem Zustand geistiger Transformation, der Erleuchtung gleichkommt.

Nicht nur im indischen Tantra, sondern auch in Europa ist die emporstrebende Schlange eines der ältesten Symbole lebensspendender Kraft. Im Äskulapstab findet sie sich seit der griechischen Antike als Zeichen der Medizin und der Pharmakologie – und in Gustav Klimts berühmtem Bild der „Medizin“ (1900-1907) entrollt sich eine goldene Schlange sogar in gleicher Weise vom Ende der Wirbelsäule her wie in klassischen tantrischen Darstellungen. Bereits im Alten Testament streut Gott feurige Sch­langen unter das Volk Israel und straft seine Sünden mit deren Biss – den Moses wiederum mit der „Ehernen Schlange“ der Erleuchtung zu heilen versteht.

Dass Martin dieses Erleuchtungsmoment wie schon beschrieben kompositorisch am oberen Bildrand immer ausspart, unterstreicht, dass er von keinerlei festgeschriebenem spirituellen Prinzip ausgeht, geschweige denn von konkreten religiösen Konzepten, um deren Repräsentation er sich Sorgen ma­chen würde. Zwar stellt „Untitled“ in der linken Schlangen- oder Flammenform geradezu schematisch die Reihung der Chakren und deren Verbindung miteinander dar (Wobei das erste Chakra mit der Bildunterkante, das siebte Chakra mit der Bildoberkante identisch ist – welche die weiße Linie jedoch nicht durchbricht, die nur vom ersten bis zum sechsten Chakra reicht und dann ihre Anbindung an die materielle Welt nicht überwindet, die von einer Horizontlinie symbolisiert wird). Zugleich aber zeigt die Anordnung weißer Punkte in den beiden schwarzen Formen weiter rechts einen geradezu ironischen Umgang mit der Energie-Metapher, machen sie doch vor allem einen unkoordiniert blub­bernden Eindruck (und überschreiten dabei spielend den Horizont!).

Womit wir bei Martins Pilz-Bildern wären. Das älteste mir bekannte stammt von 1980-1981 („Psi­lozybin“). Bis heute aber findet sich das Motiv immer wieder. Wie die „Kundalini-Schlangen“ stehen auch Martins Pilze stets auf der Bildunterkante, ganz erwartungsgemäß wachsen sie aus dem Boden. In „Mushrooms“ (2004-2008) steigen ähnlich wie in „Untitled“ fünf orangerote Punkte den Stamm eines Pilzes hinauf bis in dessen Kopf. Darüber verteilen sich, luftig gesprayt, weiße Flecken wie Sporen in der Landschaft. Eine Gruppe weiterer Pilze wird rhizomatisch mit Linien verbunden. Über das ganze Bild perlen und hüpfen verschiedenfarbige Punkte, und Titel wie „Psilozybin“ lassen keinen Zweifel daran, was für Pilze das sind und woher der flirrende Wah­rnehmungseindruck kommt. Schließlich ist der Wirkstoff dafür bekannt, Lichter, Farben und Kontraste stark zu überhöhen und vibrieren zu lassen. Ähnlich wie bei LSD scheint das Bewusstsein entgrenzt. Wie im Tantra verschmilzt das Ich mit seiner Umwelt.

Und wenn alchemistische Symbolik in Martins Werk seit jeher eine zentrale Rolle einnimmt (Zahlenmys­tik, Anagramme, Farbenlehre), so spielt sie auch auf das Wissen der Alchemisten um die psychische Wirkung chemischer Substanzen an und passt bestens zu Martins offensichtlichem Interesse für bewusstseinserweiternde Stoffe. Erleuchtung als Trip. In „Big Glitter Painting“ (2009-2010) wachsen die Pilze baumhoch und leuchten, nebst einer Wolke, neongelb und orange vor einem nächtlichen Himmel, der glitzert wie Kokainstaub. Das Motiv der „Spiritual Landscapes“ wiederholt sich diesmal in der psychedelischen Verschmelzung von Natur und Psyche, von innerer und äußerer Landschaft.

AIN‘T IT FUNKY, 2003-2010

Seit „Here“ 1986 programmatisch die Horizontlinie in Martins Werk einführt, etabliert diese immer wieder verschiedene Blick- und zugleich auch Sinnperspektiven. Mal liegt sie dabei hoch, mal tief im Bild, im Laufe der Jahre wandert sie aber vor allem an den unteren Bildrand, wo sie als gemalte Linie Pilzen, Kundali­ni-Schlangen und anderen Kompositionen Bodenhaftung gibt. Wie an „Dance“ zu sehen war, stellt sie in vielen Fällen Martins Malerei auf die Füße konkreter kultureller und sozialer Bezüge, denen sich der Künstler selbst nahe fühlt, die er bedenkt oder verehrt und in den energetischen Kontext einbindet, den seine Bilder in einer ungewöhnlichen, nämlich durch und durch profanen Magie beschwören.

Seit 2006 häufen sich die Musikreferenzen in Martins Werk massiv. Der Künstler berichtet, der Tod James Browns im gleichen Jahr habe ihn in einer Weise betroffen gemacht, die ihn überrascht habe. Chris Martin wuchs in Washington als Kind einer weißen, elitären Familie auf, in einer Nachbarschaft in Georgetown, die heute von Alarmanlagen und Sicherheitspatrouillen so sehr strotzt, dass Martin sie genau deshalb als besonders gefährlich bezeichnet. Die in Washington traditionell starke schwarze Musikkultur des Soul und Funk be­deutete für den jungen Martin eine Öffnung seines bürgerlichen Horizonts, und die sozialen Emanzipationsbewegungen des Rap und Hip-Hop wurden zur Gegenkultur seiner eigenen Herkunft. In „Rev. Al In Mourning“ (2006-2007) strahlt aus der Mitte einer rau schwarz eingestrichenen Leinwand ein leuchtend weiß gefasster Zeitungsausschnitt, der James Brown und den Bürgerrechtler Reverend Al Sharp­ton 1982 beim Verlassen des Weißen Hauses zeigt. Gemeinsam wollten sie Präsident Ronald Reagan dazu bringen, den Geburtstag Martin Luther Kings zum Nationalfeiertag zu erklären. Reverend Al trägt schwarze Trauerkleidung.

Martin hat seit 2006 James Brown viele Bilder gewidmet, von denen „Farewell Godfather of Soul...“ (2007) zu den schönsten zählt. Zweifach von einem Plattencover reproduziert, versinkt das Antlitz Browns, mit einem Blitz auf der Brust, in den Tiefen einer schwarzen Masse aus Ölfarbe, sekundiert von zwei zarten Wolken auf einem schmalen Streifen blauen Himmels. Die Verquickung von spiritueller Symbolik und politischer Thematik findet sich dann explizit in „Motown Music and the Astral Plane“ (2007-2008). Motown, das legendäre Detroiter Plattenlabel, gilt als ein Inbegriff schwarzer Emanzipation mit den Mitteln der Musik. Die Leinwand ist zu zwei Dritteln mit sieben Schallplatten von James Brown und Michael Jackson beklebt. Farbig schillernde Linien, mit denen die Platten rhizomatisch verbunden sind wie die Pilze auf „Mushrooms“, laufen auf ein oben im Bild hinter Plastikfolie isoliertes Buch zu, das den Titel „The Astral Plane“ trägt. 1895 erstmals erschienen, gibt der Autor Charles Webster Leadbeater darin eine Einführung in theosophisches Gedankengut, das er offen rassistisch nur Weißen für zugänglich hält. Brown und Jackson bündeln ihre Energien, um, wie es scheint, dieses Buch zu bannen und über den Bildrand hinaus in den Orbit zu schießen.

Auch in „Ain‘t It Funky“ (2003-2010), einem Titelzitat des gleichnamigen Albums James Browns aus dem Jahre 1970, finden sich die Verbindungslinien zwischen sieben Schallplatten. Hier aber werden sie durch eincollagierte Bilder von rituellen Orten wie Tempelanlagen und von rituellen Handlun­gen ergänzt. Am Bildrand sind Reproduktionen von antiken Vasen, einem Waldbrand, einem postkubistischen Gemäl­de Picassos („Die drei Musikanten“, 1921) und dergleichen mehr zu sehen. Vom Rand der Leinwand her wölben sich diese Referenzbilder auf ihrer dramatisch farbigen Untermalung von allen Seiten wie ein Vorhang der schwarz grundierten Bildmitte zu und lassen sie als theatralisch inszenierten Ort erscheinen. Aus der Vertikale in die Horizontale gekippt, könnte die Leinwand auch jederzeit zu einer Tanzfläche werden, auf der einzelne Schritte wie in einer rituellen Choreografie vorgezeichnet sind. Zwar ist auch die untere Horizontlinie noch da, Martin umfasst aber die komplexe energetische Konstellation im Zentrum mit einer nicht weniger komplex­en Rahmenhandlung, die das gesamte Gemälde umläuft. Das formale Bildgeschehen ist durchaus exzessiv, die Kontraste hart, die Pinselführung derb.

Tatsächlich war der Funk James Browns, fußend auf westafrikanischen Traditionen, auf ekstatisch-rituelle Tan­zerlebnisse hin konzipiert, die nicht nur Grenzen zwischen Publikumsraum und Bühne oftmals verwischten, sondern auch die Körperwahrnehmung im Fluss mit der Musik aufhoben – und zur rhythmischen Verschmelzung des Ichs mit seinem Außen animierten. Mit „Ain‘t It Funky“ unterstreicht Chris Martin erneut und besonders unmissverständlich seine Suche nach spiritueller Dynamik inmitten kultureller Praxen, Objekte und Symbole verschiedenster Provenienz, die seine Bilder hierarchielos zusammenbinden, und inmitten einer sozialen Welt, der sich seine Malerei emphatisch verpflichtet fühlt: mal andächtig, mal solidarisch, mal kritisch. Jüngst greift er verstärkt die Kunst der sogenannten „self-taught-artists“ aus dem Süden der USA auf, die politisch weniger korrekt auch „outsider-artists“ genannt werden. Sie leben am Rande der amerikanischen Wohlstandsgesellschaft und formen aus deren Müll Skulpturen und Bilder, die afrikanischen Plastiken und Kultobjekten nahestehen. Was im Reich elitärer Ästhetik abschätzig „Folklore“ genannt wird, gewichtet Martin höher als die kanonisi­erten Feierlichkeiten der sogenannten Hochkultur.

Die Vergänglichkeit des Moments, des Körpers, der Identität, das Flüchtige der Existenz an der Schwelle zum Tod, die Nichtigkeit des Materiellen, das sind die großen Themen in Martins Œuvre. Das wichtigste aber scheint mir, dass er diese Endlichkeit an keiner Stelle bejammert, sondern sie stattdessen bejaht. Im Frühwerk geschieht dies sicher noch ehrfürchtiger als im späteren Werk, das den Respekt vor der Thematik nicht verliert, es aber weniger generell und vor allem: immer weniger abstrakt auffasst. Im Titel dieses Textes habe ich mich für den Begriff „Spirituelle Abstraktion“ entschieden, womit ich primär einen Genrebegriff für diejenige Malerei meine, die sich seit Hilma Af Klint mit nichtrepräsentationalen Mitteln metaphysischen Inhalten widmet. Tatsächlich – und das versuchte ich zu zeigen – ist Martins Malerei in hohem Maße in der Physis verankert, man­chmal geradezu comichaft figurativ, und hat den großen Vorzug, sich keinerlei metaphysischem Konzept zu unterwerfen. Sie steht mit beiden Beinen in der sozialen Wirklichkeit ihres Autors, der sich gleichwohl als Subjekt seines Werkes kaum je selbst ins Spiel bringt.

Spiritualität hat in Martins Kunst allem voran eine empathische, ja solidarische Qualität. 2008 beendet Chris Martin ein Bild, das an seiner Unterkante die Inschrift trägt: „A painting for the protec­tion of Amy Winehouse“ („For Amy Winehouse“, 2004-2008). Rings um ein Portrait der unter Alkohol- und Drogensucht leidenden Sängerin drapiert Martin einen Schutzwall aus Zeitungspapier, Stoff und Haushaltsrolle, umzingelt von Glubschaugen, Symbolen der gierigen Blicke der Öffentlichkeit. Er hat ihr eine Zucker­stange ins Bild geklebt. Nach Winehouses Tod 2011 wirkt sie wie eine Grabbeigabe.

  • FRANZ ERHARD WALTHERS‘ PARTICIPATORIAL MINIMALISM
  • Abstraction in Self-Defense. Santiago Sierra’s cruel solidarity
  • Catfish Instead of Buddha. Michael E. Smith’s Materialism of Basic Needs
  • Option Lots. Eine Recherche von Brandlhuber+
  • dirt that catches the sun. CHRIS MARTIN’S SOcIAL HORIZON Of A sPIRITUAL ABSTRACTION
  • DeutschEnglish

    Text by Alexander Koch

    First published in: Gregor Jansen: Chris Martin, Staring Into The Sun, Kunsthalle Düsseldorf, Verlag der Buchhandlung Walther König, Düsseldorf, 2011

    Painting and Buddhism are good pals. While wandering together through New York’s galleries and bars, Painting regularly ponders the difference between good and bad pictures – and Buddhism counters with old Tibetan words of wisdom on which Painting’s ambitions roll off like rain from the oil stains on the asphalt. When Chris Martin dispatches Painting and Buddhism through the streets of Chelsea, dirt crunches under their shoes. And while whimsically arguing about the essence of painting in Martin’s article »Buddhism, Landscape and the Absolute Truth about Abstract Painting« for The Brooklyn Rail, the smell of alcohol on their breath combines with the putrid sweet smell of nocturnal Manhattan.

    Painting and Buddhism – just as abstraction and spirituality – appear in Martin’s article in addition to his work like two old friends who, unshaven and somewhat dishevelled, flee from colour-field painting’s precious surfaces and esoteric New Age murmurs into the next bar, to down the postmodern chic of the last preview party with a few beers. Martin is not an ironist. But the doubled solitary confinement of a spiritual art in the hallowed halls of the white cube on the one hand, and in the saccharine lotus esotericism on the other, is not for him. To be sure, he stands in the tradition of modern abstract art’s spiritual branch, whose saints, as canonised by our museums, range from Paul Klee, Piet Mondrian, Barnett Newman and many others up to and including Helmut Federle. But the further Martin’s work reaches, the more it extends over and above this canon, in fact takes it to very different social contexts to be discussed here.

    »Abstract painting is the dirt that catches the sun,« writes Martin and seeks the aesthetics of the sublime in this world, in the everyday, in popular culture, and in his neighbourhood on Graham Avenue in Brooklyn, where he moved his studio in 1984. Since the early 1990s he has regularly hung canvasses on the facades of buildings on the surrounding streets and leaves them there for weeks. In 2000 he painted a group of large black-light paintings for the Galapagos bar, adjusting it to the ultra-violet light of the night. For a 2005 exhibition poster, he took a photograph on the bank of the East River showing 50 friends gathered around the artist and four of his large-format paintings like a hippie community at a street fair. Particularly large canvasses are painted on the roof of his studio or outdoors on the pasture, where chickens strut across the fresh paint, and rain washes away one or the other picture before it even had the chance to dry. »If everything is futile anyway,« you hear Buddhism saying, »why bother tidying up?«

    Where does this gesture come from that seems somewhat coquettishly relaxed at first glance; somewhat idiosyncratic, eclectic, and very literally romantic? What is Martin driving at? What is he offering us that deserves our attention and perhaps even our approval? What does his painting contribute to art history that makes it worthy of assuming a place in it? Why does he paint mushrooms? And what do they have to do with Buddhism? A first quick response: Chris Martin generously builds bridges between cultures that have long proven their peaceful coexistence in the everyday lives of many people, but which have an effect like oil and water on all those people who would prefer that their lives and the world (and art) were systematic – cate-gorised in compartments that ensure that everything is in its proper place. And of all places, he builds these bridges leading from an old consecrated plateau of Western sophistication, namely the abstraction that has long served the United States as a trademark of its rational and spiritual superiority over other ways of life and ideologies.

    It is possible that in the process, he is not doing a service to some American identities. This explains why he has heretofore paid scant heed to the aesthetic canon of the (art)political mainstream. Even though, like few others, Martin has the capacity to reconsider one of the great ideological achievements of American history for the present day: the conviction that the solidarity of a person toward the body politic does not depend on his or her religious feelings. The fact that this conviction has fewer followers today than in past decades makes Martin’s oeuvre appear even more politically relevant.

    Here, 1995–1996

    For 12 years starting in 1992, Chris Martin worked as an art therapist with HIV-positive patients. Their dying is reflected in his series of Death Paintings. Here can be seen as the key work of this group. The drawing of a geometric cube lying on the horizon line guides the viewer’s attention into the depth like a window reveal situated in the middle of 12 square-meter monochromatic black ground. Martin makes programmatic use of one-point perspective, embodiment of the humanist turning point during the European Renaissance. But the fleeing lines in Martin’s painting open no window to a divinely ordained world inhabited by human beings. They describe an interior space in the middle of nothingness, a portal in the void. Here marks an imaginary space at the threshold between this world and the next, a narrow zone between us and death. Here means a spiritual place.

    But where is this place, precisely? In answer to this question, Martin shows his renunciation, in terms of content, of the colour-field painting that his pictorial concept nevertheless seems to resemble at first glance – thus also of a guiding aesthetic paradigm of post-war modern art in the West. This renunciation is also evident in his use of one-point perspective, which is so firmly grounded in the pictorial culture of Christian art. Mark Rothko and Barnett Newman, two major proponents of colour-field painting, rejected perspective space and saw immersing one’s sight in a colour space of painting as the gateway to a transcendental experience, which was closer to Jewish culture. Rothko’s subtle depths of colour and Newman’s strict monochromatic areas would directly dissolve the subject’s boundaries, its existence in the here and now before the canvas – also the artists’ reaction to the trauma of the Holocaust. To do so, it was necessary to blot out any and all attachment to the circumstances of the pictures’ environment. In opposition, Martin, who was essentially raised on Pop Art’s critique of abstraction’s purity requirement, virtually welcomed the profane, nearly lapidary character of his canvasses, literally covering them entirely with quick, course brushstrokes of paint. He does not suggest any exclusive dimension of experience that gives his picture surfaces an advantage of some sort over everyday objects as a result of whatever subtle materiality and, unlike Rothko and Newman, does not have to presuppose the »neutrality« of the white cube. As one commentator wrote, Martin’s pictures are as »daily as breakfast.« It is therefore by no means surprising that years after Here, he completely covered some canvasses with pieces of toast or with pillows.

    And the horizon line that Martin drew under the central axis? It structures the canvas into a top and bottom, thus suggesting a landscape. In other Death Paintings, stars are additionally painted in the top third of the picture, underscoring the impression of a nocturne. Landscapes at night in fact run like a golden thread through Martin’s oeuvre, for example in a such major work from the 1980s as John Bill Haynes’ House (1989). The window motif and the view into the darkness can also be found here. A band of text traverses the composition, providing a concrete written localisation and point in time for the painting, and that would appear in many others. And particularly large-format pictures such as Lake (2000) were painted after Here. A night-time swim in a lake, the horizon line has moved far above the centre of the painting; the inner pictorial viewpoint is close to the surface of the water. The rising moon and a few stars are rhythmically reflected in the waves. The tranquil sublime grandeur of the experience of nature is transferred to the viewer standing before this nearly 11-meter canvas. The picture’s composition and colours – which still appear in the Death Paintings for the most part as conceptual graphic reductions – now agree with the impression of nature. In his vocabulary of forms, Martin approaches indigenous folk art while thematically taking up the »spiritual landscapes« of American Romantic art that is still so little known in Europe. Lake is deeply rooted in the experience of the North American landscape und in the traditions of its representation.

    But with »spiritual landscapes«, a term has been mentioned that concludes the question concerning the spiritual location in Martin’s oeuvre for the time being. Here is not the place of the dissolution of the subject’s boundaries in pure abstraction. Here begins here, literally, in the experience and in the position of a body in space, bound to a specific point in time and to a geographic topography that will increasingly become a social topography over the course of his work. Here is a meditative state with open eyes firmly set on the horizon – and in the case of the Death Paintings – on death as well. Ethical or religious assumptions, of which the history of abstraction has seen many, are not applied in this case. For this alone a debt of gratitude is owed Chris Martin for remaining impervious to any and all religious concepts. And yet, perhaps because of this, he is able to integrate the most diverse spiritual traditions into his paintings in a positive eclectic manner. Those who wish to hold fast to religious notions and their institutionalisation will receive little pleasure from Martin’s pictures. But those who conversely welcome the secularisation of the modern world and nonetheless acknowledge that it has offered the spiritual needs of many people few alternatives other than the capitalist value and commodity fetishism will consider Martin’s position.

    Staring into the sun, 2002

    Two trips to India in 1983 and 2002 had a crucial influence on Chris Martin’s painting. He produced a larger group of paintings in 2002 that represent a turning point in his oeuvre. Martin now worked with clear, in part garish hues and colour contrasts, finding his way to stable, powerful compositions. Titles like Ganges Sunrise, Sunrise Asi Ghat Varanasi, High Noon at Manikarnika Ghat, and Staring Into The Sun allude to their motifs. Varanasi (Banaras), the city of the god Shiva, is considered Hinduism’s most sacred site. More than a million people come every day and throng to the »ghats,« the cremation sites on the steps leading down to the banks of the River Ganges. According to Hindus, the soul of whomever is cremated here is released from the endless cycle of reincarnation, and thus they entrust the ashes of the deceased to the river. Death is again the focus of this group of works. The images mark a moment at the threshold between life and death. The break of a new day, the rising sun is mirrored in the waves blackened by the ashes at a place that people hope has the power to keep them from returning for another earthly existence.

    Staring Into The Sun (2002) exaggerates the reflection of the sunlight into a gaudy yellow and red orange, a colour effect that occurs after looking directly at the sun for a moment. »Staring into the sun – that’s what you’re never supposed to do,« says Chris Martin, meaning the injuries that the retina could otherwise sustain by doing so. Only by looking down can one see the sun, which is reflected in the water indirectly. Another picture with the same title varies the theme. Three sections of canvas measuring a total of ten meters in height and three meters wide that have been pushed together are folded into the space in such a way that two-thirds of the picture lies on the ground, blocking frontal access to the vertical upper portion (Staring Into The Sun, 2002). Its top edge consists of a sunny yellow beam. Blue colour fields of various widths run underneath over a red background that tapers off in three stages toward the lower or front edge of the work.

    The three panels address the tiering of the funeral processions and the masses of pilgrims pushing their ways through the city’s narrow streets toward the cremation sites, where the funeral pyres are located. But the composition also resembles a schematic depiction of the retina, the arrangement of rod and cone cells that process the arriving light – or are scorched when they receive too much of it. In the process, Staring Into The Sun interleaves in a remarkable way the physis of visual perception with the topography of the Manikarnika Ghat and thus the finiteness of the body with the finiteness of sight.

    Incidentally, reproductions are pasted onto the lower edge of a second version of this three-part painting from 2011, including a picture of Amy Winehouse, who died the same year. Chris Martin dedicated a variation of the motif painted on a single canvas, High Noon at Manikarnika Ghat (2002–2003), to his friend and artist colleague Frank Moore. Moore was an AIDS activist who developed the red solidarity ribbon in 1991 with the Visual AIDS group. He died in 2002. High Noon… is thus turned into a requiem. The dedication is at the bottom right.

    Dance, 2006–2008

    Text elements, usually brief phrases from sentences, can be found in Martin’s work since the late 1980s. The first dedication of a picture I am aware of dates from 1996, Homage to Alfred and Bill (1982–1996). Martin is referring here to Alfred Jensen, an Abstract Expressionist painter who is less well known in Europe, and the New York painter Bill Jensen. But Martin previously seemed to still be at odds with his forebears – and with himself as well. In an earlier star picture (the seven-pointed star will later become one of Martin’s most popular motifs) entitled I Am Not… (1988–1992) he distances himself from icons of abstraction: »I am not Hilma af Klint,« »I am not Julian« (Schnabel), »I am not Alfred Jensen.« But also: »I am not Chris,« »I am not I.« The sentences are wedged onto a sky-blue background that visually opens up behind a canvas with a star-shape laceration that has been primed in black and sprinkled with gold confetti. But the »I« at the beginning of every sentence paradoxically and almost emblematically confirms, in the middle of the picture, the authorship of the person who is distancing himself. Identity and the ego might be negligible and overcome, as Buddhism aspires to, but the author’s »speaker’s position« remains initially in place.

    The distancing from his heroes was later thrown into reverse. From 1996 to the present, Homage to Alfred and Bill was followed by uncounted inscriptions with which Martin pays his respects to colleagues from the world of painting and especially music; some of them famous, others far from the mainstream. Some, like Frank Moore, Michael Jackson, or James Brown, were occasioned by their deaths. Especially beautiful is a series of four small pictures that are all collaged with a pin-up girl greeting Alfred Jensen: Good Morning Alfred Jensen, Good Morning! (2005–2007). Good Evening Alfred Jensen, Good Evening! (2007). With his homage practice, Martin breaks through the competiveness nature and innovative thinking so typical of contemporary art. Here, too, he distances himself from modernist doctrines. He does not seem interested in originality or authenticity, but rather in extensive nets of inner and outer pictorial contexts that he throws out ever more generously. In the process, he continually incorporates new cultural, social, and political themes by means of references supplemented by collage techniques. His store of material is also growing, becoming lavish and scurrilous on occasion.

    Martin’s homage practice reached its preliminary peak in Dance (2006–2008), as did his networking of diverse cultural contexts. Nine names are now placed in a row at the foot of the canvas, which is 3.4 meters high and 6.1 meters wide. Kurtis Blow, Grandmaster Flash, Kool Moe Dee, and other 1970s pioneers and eighties icons of hip-hop and rap comprise the entire base of the image. They popularised the urban ghetto recitative, invented DJing and sampling – postmodern cultural techniques. The row of names also includes the Swedish painter, spiritualist, and anthroposophist Hilma af Klint and Alfred Jensen again … in addition to his lesser-known contemporaries Paul Feeley and Myron Stout. Martin’s large-scale composition places this multiple dedication against the backdrop of a social frame of reference. A portrait of each of the cited protagonists is additionally pasted onto the left edge of the picture like a small devotional image. Some of the people are allocated a collaged object: (plastic) marijuana leaves, coins, and dollar bills, vinyl records, newspaper articles, feathers, and pills. Alfred Jensen is given a shell. A banana peel has also been stapled to the canvas and painted black – a salutation to Andy Warhol and Pop Art that Martin has repeated on numerous canvasses.

    One could think here of voodoo practices or summoning the dead with objects from their possession. While the title Dance and the buoyant vocabulary of forms indicate an homage to Henri Matisse – whose famous equally large-format painting La Danse (1909/1910) depicts five joyously moving women and was also painted as a sort of twin to La Musique (1910) – Martin’s painting appears as a dance of death, particularly in the context of his work. All the cited painters are deceased. The musicians, on the other hand, are still living. Matisse’s painting is pioneering in formal terms for its reduction down to three colours, with which the interior forms are filled in almost monochromatically. Martin employs the same formal principle. Six sweeping, regularly curved, completely white forms that, seen anthropomorphically, could doubtlessly recall gyrating hips, are encompassed within a monochromatic black field. Their edges are outlined in red, blue, and yellow. In the viewer’s perception, however, the forms seem to rest less on the dark ground than behind it, as if the canvas primed in black and opened six-fold in generous sweeps offers a glimpse of a white light space behind it, whose dimensions remain indeterminable.

    Martin’s canvas again functions as a threshold between a worldly, in this case particularly socially and culturally definable place, and an intangible dimension that can in turn be characterised as spiritual. With their pointy ends, the white compartments of form are fitted in between the top and bottom edges of the work like Tibetan prayer wheels in their shrine. That such wheels, when turned, spin on their own axes like the row of dancers in Matisse’s painting, reaffirms the comparison between the pictures. But especially the lower base of Martin’s winding forms has been given much significance, while in Dance, as well as in all comparable paintings, the upper edge of the picture assists in containing the composition but is itself never addressed. A »top« – virtually required by Christian iconography and constantly exposed both symbolically and compositionally – does not exist in Martin’s work. To the extent that his compositions have a formal and energetic base, it is at the bottom, on the ground and absolutely in the dirt, which, as Chris Martin and the title of this
    essay says, captures the sun.

    Untitled, 2005

    Pictures with such pulsating forms as in Dance form the largest and most reproduced group of works in Chris Martin’s oeuvre. With very few deviations, Untitled from 1988 already follows the same compositional principles. I wish to discuss this group in more detail because numerous individual examples enable a further analogy that is in turn not unfamiliar to Buddhism and closely affiliated especially with Tantric practice. As an example, I would like to discuss a small painting on cardboard, Untitled (2005).

    Three forms simultaneously wind their way upward here from the lower edge of the picture, standing out black against a fiery red background. They extend up like flickering tongues of flame, each of them surrounding a different number of more or less white dots: five at the left, fourteen in the middle and seven at the right. Against the backdrop of Martin’s reception of Buddhism, it makes sense to link this energetic picture to Kundalini power. Tantric writings use the Sanskrit term Kundalini to describe the potential in the human being that comes closest to the energy of the earth, the material, and rests like a coiled snake at the base of the spine in the lowest chakra. The most elementary of all human forces can be awakened from there through yoga practices, meditation, and Tantric sexuality, like a fire that climbs up the spine and breaks through one chakra after the other (the white dots in Martin’s picture) to ultimately combine via the crown chakra at the top of the head with the cosmic, spiritual energy – which corresponds to the state of spiritual transformation, and enlightenment.

    Not only in Indian Tantra but in Europe as well, a rising snake is one of the oldest symbols of life-giving force. Since Classical antiquity, it can been found as the symbol of medicine and pharmacology in the rod of Asclepius, and even in Gustav Klimt’s famed painting The Medicine (1900–1907), a golden snake uncoils in the same way from the base of the spine as in classic Tantric representations. Even in the Old Testament, God sent out fiery serpents against the people of Israel to punish their sins with its bite, which Moses in turn healed with the »brazen serpent« of enlightenment.

    The fact that Martin, as described above, compositionally always leaves this moment of enlightenment blank underscores the fact that he does not proceed from any fixed spiritual principle, much less from concrete religious concepts which he would care enough about to represent. Admittedly, Untitled depicts the row of the chakras and their connections to each other in a virtually schematic manner by means of the snake or flame-like form at the left. (However, the first chakra is identical to the lower edge of the picture, the seventh with the upper edge – which the white line that only extends from the first to the sixth chakra does not break through and thus fails to overcome its connection to the material world, symbolised by a horizon line.) At the same time, the arrangement of the white dots in the two black forms further to the right reveals an almost ironic handling of the energy metaphor, to the extent that they make a particularly uncoordinated bubbling impression (and playfully overstep the horizon in the process!).

    This brings us to Martin’s mushroom pictures. The earliest I know of dates to 1980 (Psilocybin). The motif still recurs regularly in Martin’s work today. Like the Kundalini snake, Martin’s mushrooms always stand on the lower edge of the picture, growing completely from the ground, as expected. As in Untitled, five orange red dots run up the stem of a mushroom to its cap in Mushrooms (2004–2008). Airily sprayed, white spots are distributed above like spores in a landscape. Another group of mushrooms is connected with an rhizomatic array of lines. Variously coloured dots bead and leap across the whole picture, and titles like Psilocybin leave no doubt about what kind of mushrooms are involved and where the shimmering impression of perception comes from. After all, its active ingredient is greatly heightening the experience of lights, colours, and contrasts and causing them to vibrate. As with LSD, the boundaries of consciousness seem dissolved. And like in Tantra, the self merges with its surroundings.

    And if alchemistic symbolism has always assumed a central role in Martin’s work (numerology, anagrams, colour theory), it likewise alludes to alchemistic knowledge of the psychological effects of chemical substances and thus optimally suited to Martin’s apparent interest in mind-expanding drugs. Enlightenment as a trip. Mushrooms grow as high as trees in Big Glitter Painting (2009–2010) and shine, together with a cloud, neon yellow and orange against a night sky that glistens like cocaine powder. The »spiritual landscapes« motif is repeated here this time in the psychedelic merger of nature and the psyche, of the inner and outer landscape.

    Ain’t it funky, 2003–2010

    Ever since the horizon line was programmatically introduced in Here in 1986, it has established different perspectives of sight as well as of meaning. The horizon lines lay higher in the picture at times, at other times lower, but over the years they are largely located at the lower edge of the picture where as painted lines they provide a grip on reality in the shape of mushrooms, Kundalini snakes, and other compositions. As could be seen in Dance, they often place Martin’s paintings firmly on the feet of concrete cultural and social references that the artist feels close to, thinks about, or admires. He integrates them into the energetic context his pictures invoke with an unconventional, thoroughly profane magic.

    References to music have dramatically increased in Martin’s work since 2006. The artist has said that James Brown’s death moved him in a way that even he found surprising. Martin grew up in Washington, D.C. as the child of an elitist white family in a Georgetown neighbourhood that now has so many alarm systems and security patrols that Martin describes it as particularly dangerous for that very reason. The traditionally strong black soul and funk culture in Washington meant that the young Martin could broaden his middle-class horizon, and the social emancipatory movements of rap and hip-hop became an alternative culture to his own heritage. In Rev. Al In Mourning (2006–2007), a newspaper clipping surrounded by white radiates from the middle of a canvas that has been coarsely painted in black. The clipping shows James Brown and the civil rights activist Reverend Al Sharpton leaving the White House in 1982. Together they wanted to convince President Ronald Reagan to declare Martin Luther King Jr.’s birthday a national holiday. Reverend Al wears black mourning clothes.

    Martin has dedicated numerous pictures to James Brown since 2006, one of the most beautiful of which is Farewell Godfather of Soul… (2007). Reproduced twice from an album cover, Brown’s face, with a lightning bolt on his chest, is submerged in the depths of a black mass of oil paint, seconded by two delicate clouds on a narrow strip of blue sky. The fusion of spiritual symbolism and political themes is likewise explicit in Motown Music and the Astral Plane (2007–2008). Motown, the legendary Detroit album label, is considered the epitome of black emancipation through music. Two-thirds of the canvas has been covered with seven records by James Brown and Michael Jackson. Shimmering colourful lines with which, like in Mushrooms, the LPs are connected rhizomatically, veer toward a book under plastic foil at the top of the picture, which bears the title The Astral Plane. First published in 1895, the book’s author Charles Webster Leadbeater provides an introduction to theosophical thought that he, openly racist, regards accessible only to whites. Brown and Jackson are bundling their energy in order, so it seems, to banish this book and shoot it into orbit beyond the edge of the picture.

    In Ain’t It Funky (2003–2010) – the title quotes James Brown’s 1970 album of the same name – connecting lines can be found between seven LPs. But these are supplemented by collaged pictures of
    ritual sites, such as temples, and ritual acts. Reproductions of antique vases, a forest fire, a post-Cubist painting by Pablo Picasso (Three Musicians, 1921) and other such things can be seen on the edge of the picture. These reference pictures bulge on all sides from the edge of the canvas on their dramatically coloured underpainting, like a curtain toward the centre of the picture primed in black, making it appear like a theatrically staged scene. Tilted from the vertical to the horizontal, the canvas could be turned at any time into a dance floor on which the individual steps are predetermined, as in a ritual choreography. While the horizon line at the bottom is still present, Martin encompasses the energetic constellation in the middle with a no less complex subplot that circulates around the whole picture. In formal terms, the pictorial occurrence is excessive, the contrasts are hard, the brushstrokes coarse.

    Based on West African traditions, James Brown’s funk music was in fact conceived with ecstatic, ritualistic dance experiences in mind. This often not only blurred the boundary between the auditorium and stage but also suspended corporeal perception in the flow of the music, animating a rhythmic merger of the self with its exterior. In Ain’t It Funky, Martin again very unmistakably underscores his pursuit of spiritual dynamics amidst cultural practices, objects, and symbols from diverse provenances. His pictures bind them together without hierarchies and amidst a social world that his painting feels beholden to, sometimes devoutly, sometimes solidarily, sometimes critically. He recently intensely seized on the art of the so-called self-taught artists from the southern United States, who are – less politically correctly – also called outsider artists. They live on the outskirts of America’s affluent society and with their rubbish make sculptures and pictures that approach African sculpture and cult objects. Martin attaches greater significance to that which is dismissed as »folklore« by the upper echelon of aesthetics than to the canonised celebrations of so-called high culture.

    The transitory nature of the moment, of the body, of identity, the fleetingness of existence at the threshold of death, the nothingness of the material, are the great themes in Martin’s oeuvre. But for me, the most important thing is that he never complains about this finiteness, affirming it instead. To be sure, this occurs more reverentially in his early works than in his later paintings in which the respect for the thematic is not lost, but comprehended less generally and especially increasingly less abstract. I have chosen the term »spiritual abstraction« for the title of this essay, and by this I primarily mean the term for a genre of painting that since Hilma af Klint has devoted itself to the representation of metaphysical contents with non-representational means. The fact is – and that is what I am trying to demonstrate – that Martin’s paintings are highly grounded in the physis, in nature, sometimes with almost comic-like figurativeness, and they have the great advantage of not subjugating themselves to any metaphysical concept. They stand with both feet planted firmly on the social reality of their author who, despite being the subject of his work, hardly brings himself into play.

    In Martin’s art, spirituality first and foremost has an empathic, in fact solidary character. In 2008, Chris Martin completed a picture that bears an inscription on the lower edge reading »A painting for the protection of Amy Winehouse« (For Amy Winehouse, 2004–2008). Martin draped a protective wall made out Kleenex tissues/fabric around a portrait of the singer who suffered from alcohol and drug addiction, encircling it with goggle eyes symbolising the public’s greedy glances. He pasted a candy cane for her onto the picture. After Winehouse’s death in 2011, it appears like a funerary object.

    Schmutz, der die Sonne fängt. Chris Martins sozialer Horizont einer spirituellen Abstraktion
    Text by Alexander Koch

    First published in: Gregor Jansen: Chris Martin, Staring Into The Sun, Kunsthalle Düsseldorf, Verlag der Buchhandlung Walther König, Düsseldorf, 2011

    Malerei und Buddhismus sind gute Kumpel. Wenn sie durch New Yorker Galerien und Kneipen ziehen, sinniert Malerei regelmäßig über den Unterschied zwischen guten und schlechten Bildern – und Buddhismus entgegnet mit alten tibetischen Weisheiten, an denen Malereis Ambitionen abperlen wie der Regen an den Ölflecken auf dem Asphalt. Dreck knirscht unter ihren Schuhen, wenn Chris Martin Malerei und Buddhismus durch die Straßen von Chelsea schickt. Und während die beiden in seinem Artikel „Buddhism, Landscape and the absolute Truth about Abstract Painting“ für die Zeitschrift Brooklyn Rail launig über das Wesen der Kunst streiten, mischen sich ihre Alkoholfahnen unter den fauligen, süßlichen Geruch des nächtlichen Manhattan.

    Malerei und Buddhismus – ebenso wie Abstraktion und Spiritualität – erscheinen in Martins Artikel und auch in seinem Werk als ein altes Freundespaar, das unrasiert und leicht zerzaust vor den preziösen Oberflächen der Farbfeldmalerei und dem esoterischen Raunen des New Age in die nächste Bar flüchtet, um dort den postmodernen Chic der letzten Vernissageparty mit ein paar Bieren runterzuspülen. Martin ist kein Ironiker. Aber die doppelte Isolationshaft einer spirituellen Kunst in den heiligen Hallen des White Cube einerseits und in weichgespülter Lotus-Esoterik anderseits ist nicht seine Sache. Sicher, er stellt sich in eine Linie mit dem spirituellen Zweig innerhalb der modernen Abstraktion, der sich mit Künstlern wie Paul Klee, Piet Mondrian, Barnett Newman und vielen anderen bis hin zu Helmut Federle museal kanonisiert findet. Doch je weiter sein Werk reicht, desto weiter greift es über diesen Kanon hinaus, ja: zieht ihn hinüber in ganz andere soziale Zusammenhänge, die hier zu erörtern sind.

    „Malerei ist der Schmutz, der die Sonne fängt“, schreibt Martin und sucht die Ästhetik des Erhabenen im Dies­seits, im Alltag, in der Populärkultur und in seiner Nachbarschaft an der Graham Avenue in Brooklyn, wo er 1984 sein Atelier bezog. In den umliegenden Straßenzügen hängt er seit 2000 immer wieder Leinwände an Häuserfassaden, wo er sie wochenlang belässt. 2003 malt er wandfüllende Gemälde für die Galapagos-Bar und stimmt sie auf das nächtliche Schwarzlicht ab. Für ein Ausstellungsplakat nimmt er 2004 am Ufer des East River ein Foto auf, auf dem sich 50 Freunde um den Künstler und vier seiner großformatigen Bilder versammeln wie eine Hippie-Community beim Straßenfest. Besonders große Leinwände malt er auf dem Dach seines Ateliers oder draußen auf der Wiese, wo Hühner über die frische Farbe laufen und der Regen manches Bild wieder aus­wäscht, ehe es trocknet. „Es ist eh alles nichtig“, hört man Buddhismus sagen, „warum also aufräumen?“

    Woher kommt dieser Gestus, der auf den ersten Blick etwas kokett entspannt erscheint, etwas idiosynkratisch, eklektizistisch und im ganzen Wortsinn: romantisch? Worauf will Martin hinaus? Was bietet er an, das unsere Aufmerksamkeit und eventuell unsere Zustimmung lohnt? Was fügt seine Malerei der Kunstgeschichte hinzu, so dass ihr darin ein Platz zustünde? Warum malt er Pilze? Und was haben die mit Buddhismus zu tun? Eine erste, schnelle Antwort: Chris Martin baut freizügig Brücken zwischen Kulturen, die ihre friedliche Koexistenz im Alltag vieler Menschen längst bewiesen haben, aber wie Öl und Wasser auf all jene Leute wirken, die ihr Leben und die Welt (und die Kunst) gerne systematisch hätten ­– eingeteilt in Kompartimente, die ihnen versichern, dass jedes Ding an einen rechten Platz gehört. Und er baut diese Brücken ausgerechnet von einem alten, geweihten Hochplateau westlicher Kultiviertheit aus, der Abstraktion, die den Vereinigten Staaten so lange als Signatur ihrer rationalen und spirituellen Überlegenheit gegenüber anderen Lebensweisen und Ideologien gedient hat.

    Manchen US-amerikanischen Identitäten mag er damit keinen Dienst tun. So erklärt sich, dass er am ästhe­tischen Kanon des (kunst)politischen Mainstream bislang vorbeilief. Dabei hat Martins Werk es wie nur wenige verstanden, eine der großen ideologischen Errungenschaften der US-Geschichte für die Gegenwart weiterzuden­ken: Dass nämlich die Solidarität eines Menschen gegenüber seinem Gemeinwesen unabhängig davon ist, welche re­ligiösen Gefühle er hat. Dass diese Unterscheidung heute vielfach annulliert wird, lässt Martins Werk auch politisch um so relevanter erscheinen.

    HERE, 1995-1996

    20 Jahre lang, ab 1992, arbeitete Chris Martin als Kunsttherapeut mit HIV-infizierten, meist jungen Patienten. In der Reihe der „Death Paintings“ spiegelt sich ihr Sterben. „Here“ kann als Schlüsselwerk dieser Reihe gelten. Auf einem zwölf Quadratmeter großen, monochrom schwarzen Fond steht mittig die Zeichnung eines geome­trischen Kubus, der auf einer Horizontlinie ruht und den Blick wie eine Fensterlaibung in die Tiefe führt. Programmatisch setzt Martin die Zentralperspektive ein, Inbegriff der humanistischen Wende in der europäischen Renaissance. Aber die fliehenden Linien in Martins Bild öffnen kein Fenster zu einer gottge­wollten und von Menschen bewohnten Welt. Sie zeichnen einen Binnenraum mitten im Nichts, ein Portal in die Leere. „Here“ markiert einen imaginären Raum auf der Schwelle zwischen Diesseits und Jenseits, eine schmale Zone zwischen uns und dem Tod. „Here“ meint einen spirituellen Ort.

    Aber wo genau liegt dieser Ort? In der Antwort auf diese Frage zeigt sich Martins inhaltliche Abkehr von der Farbfeldmalerei, der sein Bildkonzept auf den ersten Blick doch zu ähneln scheint – und damit von einem ästhetischen Leitparadigma der westlichen Nachkriegsmoderne. Auch in der Verwendung der fest in der christlichen Bildkultur verankerten Zentralperspektive zeigt sich diese Abkehr. Mark Rothko und Barnett Newman, zwei Hauptvertreter des „Colour Field Painting“, sahen die Versenkung des Blicks in einen Farbraum der Malerei, der den perspe­ktivischen Raum überwand, als Tor zu einer transzendentalen Erfahrung, die jüdischer Kultur näherstand. Die subtilen Farbtiefen Rothkos und die streng monochromen Flächen Newmans sollten das Subjekt, seine Existenz im Hier und Jetzt vor der Leinwand, unmittelbar entgrenzen – auch eine Reaktion der Künstler auf das Trauma des Holocaust. Dazu war es erforderlich, jede Anhaftung an die Gegebenheiten der Lebenswelt aus den Bildern zu tilgen. Martin, der die Kritik der Pop Art am ästhetischen Reinheitsgebot der Abstraktion quasi schon in die Wiege gelegt bekam, begrüßt dagegen geradezu den profanen, ja lapidaren Charakter seiner Leinwand und malt sie mit schnellen, groben Pinselstrichen buchstäblich zu. Er suggeriert keinerlei exklusive Erfahrungsdimension, die seine Bildoberflächen aufgr­und irgendeiner subtilen Materialität Alltagsobjekten voraushätten, und muss anders als Rothko und Newman auch nicht die „Neutralität“ des White Cube voraussetzen. Martins Bilder sind, wie ein Kommentator schrieb, „as daily as breakfast“, so alltäglich wie das Frühstück. Dass er Jahre nach „Here“ einige Leinwände vollflächig mit Toastbroten oder Kopfkissen bedeckt, überrascht also nicht.

    Und die Horizontlinie, die Martin unterhalb der Mittelachse zieht? Sie gliedert die Leinwand in Oben und Unten und sug­geriert so eine Landschaft. In anderen „Death Paintings“ finden sich zudem Sterne ins obere Bilddrittel gemalt und verstärken die Anmutung eines Nachtstücks. Tatsächlich ziehen sich nächtliche Landschaften wie ein roter Faden durch Martins Werk. So in einem Hauptwerk der Achtzigerjahre, „John Bill Haynes' Haus“. Auch hier finden sich das Fenstermotiv und der Blick ins Dunkel. Ein Textband durchzieht die Kom­position und nennt schriftlich einen konkreten Ort und Zeipunkt für das Gemälde, so wie es noch viele weitere tun werden. Und bald nach „Here“ entstehen besonders großformatige Bilder wie „Lake“ (2000): Ein nächtliches Bad in einem See, die Horizontlinie ist weit oberhalb der Bildmitte gerückt, der bildinterne Be­trachterstandpunkt liegt nahe der Wasseroberfläche. Der aufgehende Mond und einzelne Sterne spiegeln sich rhythmisch in den Wellen. Die stille, erhabene Größe dieser Naturerfahrung überträgt sich auf die Betrachter vor der fast elf Meter langen Leinwand. Komposition und Farbgebung des Bildes – die in den „Death Paintings“ noch als primär konzeptionelle, grafische Reduktion erschien – deckt sich nun mit dem Natureindruck. Martin nähert sich in seiner Formensprache der indigenen Volkskunst, während er thematisch die „Spiritual Landscapes“ der in Europa noch immer wenig bekannten US-amerikanischen Romantik aufgreift. „Lake“ ist tief verwurzelt in der Erfahrung der nordamerikanischen Landschaft und in den Traditionen ihrer Darstellung.

    Mit „Spiritual Landscapes“ aber ist ein Stichwort gefallen, das die Frage nach dem spirituellen Ort in Martins Werk fürs Erste abschließt. „Here“ ist kein Ort der Entgrenzung des Subjekts in reiner Abstraktion. „Here“ beginnt hier, buch­stäblich, in der Erfahrung und im Standpunkt eines Körpers im Raum, gebunden an einen Zeitpunkt und an eine geografische Topografie, die im Werkverlauf zunehmend eine soziale Topografie werden wird. „Here“ ist ein meditativer Zustand mit offenen Augen, den Horizont – und im Falle der „Death Paintings“ auch den Tod – fest im Blick. Ethisch-religiöse Konzepte, von denen die Geschichte der Abstraktion so viele gesehen hat, braucht es dazu nicht. Allein dafür ist Chris Martin schon zu danken: dass er gegenüber jeglichen religiösen Vorstellungen unempfindlich bleibt und dennoch – beziehungsweise: gerade deshalb – in der Lage ist, verschiedenste spiri­tuelle Traditionslinien positiv eklektizistisch in seine Malerei zu integrieren. Wer an religiösen Vorstellungen und an ihrer Institutionalisierung spiritueller Erfahrung festhalten will, wird an Martins Bildern wenig Freude haben. Wer hingegen die Säkularisierung der modernen Welt begrüßt und dennoch anerkennt, dass sie dem spirituel­len Bedürfnis vieler Menschen kaum andere Alternativen als den kapitalistischen Wert- und Warenfetischismus angeboten hat, wird Martins Position bedenken.

    STARING INTO THE SUN, 2002

    Zwei Indienreisen, 1983 und 2002, haben Chris Martins Malerei entscheidend geprägt. 2002 entsteht eine größere Gruppe von Bildern, die eine Wende im Werk darstellen. Martin arbeitet nun mit klaren, teils grellen Tönen und Farbkontrasten und findet zu stabilen, mächtigen Kompositionen. Titel wie „Ganges Sunrise“, „Sun­rise Asi Ghat Varanasi“, „High Noon at Manikarnika Ghat“ und „Staring Into The Sun“ deuten auf deren Motive. Varanasi (Bengasi), die Stadt des Gottes Shiva, gilt als wichtigstes Heiligtum des Hinduismus. Täglich kommen rund eine Million Menschen und drängen zu den „Ghats“, den Krematorien an den Uferterrassen des Ganges. Wessen Leichnam hier verbrannt wird, dem bleibt die Wiedergeburt erspart, sagen die Hindus und übergeben die Asche der Verstorbenen dem Fluss. Erneut ist der Tod das Kernthema der Werkgruppe. Und wieder marki­eren die Bilder einen Moment an der Schwelle zwischen Werden und Vergehen. Am Anbruch eines neuen Tages spiegelt sich die aufgehende Sonne in den von Asche geschwärzten Wellen an einem Ort, von dem die Menschen hoffen, er habe die Macht, sie vor der Rückkehr in ein weiteres irdisches Leben zu bewahren.

    „Staring Into The Sun“ (2002) übersteigert die Reflexion des Sonnenlichts in grellem Gelb und Rotorange – ein Farbeffekt, wie er bei einem kurzen, direkten Blick hinauf zur Sonne eintritt. „Staring into the sun - that‘s what you’re supposed to never do“, sagt Chris Martin auf Anfrage und meint damit die Zer­störung der Netzhaut, die andernfalls droht. Nur der gesenkte Blick nach unten erlaubt es, die Sonne, die sich im Wasser spiegelt, indirekt zu sehen. Ein weiteres Bild gleichen Titels variiert das Thema. Drei zusammengeschobene Leinwandflächen von insgesamt zehn Metern Länge und drei Metern Breite sind in den Raum geklappt, so dass zwei Drittel des Bildes am Boden liegen und eine frontale Annäherung an die vertikale Abschlusstafel verstellen. Deren obere Bildkante besteht aus einem sonnengelben Balken (höher kann der Horizont in einem Bild nicht liegen). Darunter verlaufen über einem roten Bildgrund unterschiedlich breite, blaue Farbfelder, die sich in drei Etappen zur Bildunter- beziehungsweise Vorderkante hin verjüngen.

    „Staring Into The Sun“ (2002) greift die Staffelung der Leichenzüge und der Pilgermengen auf, die sich durch die engen Gassen der Stadt zu den Krematorien drängen, wo die Scheiterhaufen stehen. Die Komposition gleicht aber auch einer schematischen Darstellung der Netzhaut, der Anordnung von Stäbchen und Zäpfchen (Rot, Blau, Grün), die das eintreffende Licht verarbeiten - oder von ihm versengt werden, wenn sie zuviel davon abbekommen. „Staring Into The Sun“ verschränkt dabei auf bemerkenswerte Weise die Physis der visuellen Wahrnehmung mit der Topografie des Manikarnika Ghat, und damit die Endlichkeit des Körpers mit der Endlichkeit des Blicks.

    In einer zweiten Fassung des dreiteiligen Bildes von 2011 sind an dessen Unterkante übrigens Reproduktionen eingeklebt, u.a. ein Bild der im gleichen Jahr verstorbenen Amy Winehouse. Eine Variation des Motivs auf einer einzelnen Leinwand, „High Noon at Manikarnika Ghat“ (2002-2003), hat Chris Martin seinem Freund und Künstlerkollegen Frank Moore gewidmet. Moore war AIDS-Aktivist und entwickelte 1991 mit der Gruppe Visual AIDS die Solidaritätsschleife „Red Ribbon“. Er starb 2002. „High Noon...“ wird so zum Requiem. Die Widmung steht unten rechts.

    DANCE, 2006-2008

    Eingeschriebene Texte finden sich im Werk Martins seit Ende der Achtzigerjahre, meist in kurzen Satzformeln. Die erste mir bekannte Widmung eines Bildes stammt von 1996, „Homage to Alfred and Bill“ (1982-1996). Gemeint sind Alfred Jensen, einer der in Europa weniger berühmten Vertreter des Abstrakten Expres­sionismus, und der New Yorker Maler Bill Jensen. Zuvor aber scheint Martin noch mit seinen Vorbildern zu hadern, ebenso wie mit sich selbst. In einem frühen Sternbild (später wird der siebenzackige Stern eines von Martins populärsten Motiven werden) mit dem Titel „I Am Not...“ (1988-1992) grenzt er sich von Ikonen der Abstraktion ab: „I am not Hilma Af Klint“, „I am not Julian“ (Schnabel), „I am not Alfred Jensen“. Aber auch: „I am not Chris“, „I am not I“. Die Sätze stehen eingezwängt auf einem himmelblauen Grund, der sich optisch hinter einer schwarz grundierten und mit Ruhmesgold bestäubten, sternförmig aufgerissenen Leinwand öffnet. Aber das „I“ an jedem Satzbeginn bestätigt in der Bildmitte paradoxerweise und geradezu emblematisch die Autorschaft desjenigen, der sich da distanziert. Die Identität, das Ego, mag nichtig und überwindbar sein – wonach der Buddhismus strebt – die Sprecherposition eines Autors bleibt aber zunächst einmal bestehen.

    Die Distanzierung von seinen Heroen verkehrt sich später ins Gegenteil. Auf „Homage to Alfred and Bill“ folgen von 1996 bis heute unzählige Inschriften, mit denen Chris Martin Künstlerkolleginnen und -kollegen aus der Malerei und vor allem aus der Musik seine Reverenz erweist. Berühmtheiten ebenso wie solchen, die neben dem Mainstream lagen und liegen. Manchmal, wie bei Frank Moore, Michael Jackson oder James Brown anlässlich ihres Todes. Besonders schön ist eine Reihe von vier kleinen Bildern, allesamt mit einem eincollagierten Pin-Up-Girl versehen, die Alfred Jensen zum Morgen und zum Abend grüßen: „Good Morning Alfred Jensen, Good Morning!“ (2007). „Good Evening Alfred Jensen, Good Evening!“ (2007).

    Mit seiner Hommage-Praxis durchbricht Martin das für die zeitgenössische Kunst so typische Konkurrenz- und Innovationsdenken. Auch diesbezüglich löst er sich aus der modernistischen Doktrin. Weder Originalität noch Au­thentizität scheinen ihn zu interessieren, wohl aber weitläufige Netze bildinterner und -externer Kontexte, die er immer großzügiger auswirft. Dabei bindet er über die Referenzen, ergänzt durch Collagetechniken, immer neue kulturelle, soziale und politische Themen ein. Auch sein Materialfundus wächst und wird bisweilen üppig und skurril.

    Mit „Dance“ (2006-2008) erreicht Chris Martins Hommage-Praxis dann einen vorläufigen Höhepunkt. Ebenso seine Vernetzung diverser kultureller Kontexte. Am Fuß der 3,4 Meter hohen und 6,1 Meter breiten Leinwand finden sich gleich neun Namen aufgereiht. Sie bestimmen die gesamte Basis des Bildes. Kurtis Blow, Grandmaster Flash, Kool Moe Dee und andere sind 70er-Jahre-Pioniere und 80er-Jahre-Ikonen des Hip-Hop und des Rap. Sie machten den Sprechgesang aus den Großstadtghettos populär, erfanden das DJ-ing und das Sampling − Kulturtechniken der Postmoderne. Weiter umfasst die Namensreihe die schwed­ische Malerin, Spiritistin und Anthroposophin Hilma af Klint, erneut Alfred Jensen sowie dessen weni­ger bekannte Zeitgenossen Paul Feeley und Myron Stout. Diese multiple Widmung stellt Martins großflächige Komposition auf das Fundament eines sozialen Bezugsrahmens. Von jedem der zitierten Protagonisten findet sich zudem ein Porträt an den linken Bildrand geklebt wie ein kleines Andachtsbild. Manchen Personen ist ein eincollagiertes Objekt beigegeben: Marihuanablätter (aus Plastik), Geldstücke und Dollarnoten, Schallplatten und Zeitungsartikel, Federn und Tabletten. Alfred Jensen bekommt eine Muschel. Auch eine Bananenschale ist an die Leinwand getackert und schwarz übermalt - ein Gruß an Warhol und die Pop Art, den Martin auf mehreren Leinwänden wiederholt.

    Man mag an Voodoo-Praxen denken oder an die Beschwörung Toter mithilfe von Objekten aus ihrem Besitz. Ist „Dance“ dem Titel und der beschwingten Formensprache nach eine Hommage an Matisse – dessen berühmtes, ebenfalls großformatiges Bild „La Danse“ (1909/1910) fünf Frauen in lebensfroher Bewegung zeigt und das im Doppelpack mit „La Musique“ (1910) entstand – so erscheint Martins Gemälde zumal im Zusammenhang seines Werkes als Totentanz. Alle zitierten Malerinnen und Maler sind verblichen, die Musiker hingegen noch nicht. Formal gilt an Matisse‘ Bild die Reduktion auf drei Farben wegweisend, welche die Binnenformen nahezu monochrom ausfüllen (Rot für die Körper, Blau für den Himmel und Grün für das Gras). Das gleiche formale Prinzip findet sich bei Martin. Sechs voll­flächig weiße, in regelmäßigen Kurven geschwungene Formen, die anthropomorph gedeutet durchaus an schwingende Hüften denken lassen, sind eingefasst in monochromes Schwarz. An ihren Rändern sind sie mit roten, blauen und gelben Linien gefasst. In der Wahrnehmung scheinen sie dadurch weni­ger auf dem dunklen Fonds zu liegen als vielmehr dahinter, so als gäbe die sich sechsfach in großzü­gigen Schwüngen öffnende, schwarz grundierte Leinwand den Blick auf einen hinter ihr liegenden weißen Lichtraum frei, dessen Ausmaß unbestimmbar bleibt.

    Ein weiteres Mal fungiert Chris Martins Leinwand als Schwelle zwischen einem diesseitigen, in die­sem Fall vor allem sozial und kulturell bestimmbaren Ort, und einer nicht zu greifenden, wiederum als spirituell zu bezeichnenden Dimension. Mit ihren spitzen Enden sind die weißen Formkompartimente zwischen Bildunterkante und -oberkante eingepasst wie tibetische Gebetsmühlen in ihren Schrein. Dass sich solche Mühlen, stößt man sie an, um die eigene Achse drehen wie der Reigen von Tänzerinnen bei Matisse, macht den Bildvergleich nochmals evident. Vor allem der unteren Basis von Martins schlängelnden Formen kommt aber zentrale Bedeutung zu – während in „Dance“ wie in allen seiner vergleichbaren Gemälde die Bildoberkante zwar die Komposition mit hält, nie aber selbst thematisch wird. Ein „Oben“, das etwa die christliche Ikonografie im Vergleich geradezu vorausge­setzt und stets symbolisch wie kompositorisch exponiert hat, gibt es bei Martin nicht. Sofern seine Kompositionen eine formale und energetische Basis haben, liegt sie unten, am Boden und durchaus auch im Schmutz, von dem Chris Martin und der Titel dieses Essays sagen, dass er die Sonne fängt.

    UNTITLED, 2005

    Bilder mit solch schwingenden Formen wie in „Dance“ bilden die größte, zumindest die am meisten reproduzierte Gruppe von Werken aus Chris Martins Œuvre. Bereits „Untitled“ aus dem Jahr 1988, folgt mit wenigen Abweichungen dem exakt gleichen Kompositionsprinzip. Ich will auf diese Werkgruppe noch näher eingehen, weil sie anlässlich zahlreicher Einzelbeispiele eine weit­ere, wiederum dem Buddhismus nicht unvertraute und vor allem der tantrischen Praxis nahestehende Analogie erlaubt. Als Beispiel ziehe ich eine kleine Malerei auf Pappkarton heran, „Untitled“ (2005).

    Simultan schlängeln sich dort drei Formen von der Bildunterkante nach oben und heben sich dabei schwarz gegen einen feurig orangeroten Hintergrund ab. Sie recken sich wie züngelnde Flammen zur Bildo­berkante und fassen dabei eine je verschiedene Zahl mehr oder weniger weißer Punkte: links fünf, in der Mitte vierzehn, rechts sieben. Vor dem Hintergrund von Martins Buddhismus-Rezeption macht es Sinn, dieses energetische Bild mit der Kundalini-Kraft in Verbindung zu bringen. Mit dem Sanskrit-Begriff „Kundalini“ beschreiben tantrische Schriften dasjenige Potenzial im Menschen, das der Erdenergie, der Materie, am nächsten ist und am Ende der Wirbelsäule im untersten Chakra ruht wie eine zusam­mengerollte Schlange. Von dort kann die elementarste aller menschlichen Kräfte, durch Yogi-Praxen, durch Meditation und durch tantrische Sexualität geweckt, wie ein Feuer die Wirbelsäule emporstei­gen und Chakra nach Chakra durchbrechen (die weißen Punkte in Martins Bild), um sich schließlich über das Chronchakra am Scheitel des Kopfes mit der kosmischen, spirituellen Energie zu verbinden – was dem Zustand geistiger Transformation, der Erleuchtung gleichkommt.

    Nicht nur im indischen Tantra, sondern auch in Europa ist die emporstrebende Schlange eines der ältesten Symbole lebensspendender Kraft. Im Äskulapstab findet sie sich seit der griechischen Antike als Zeichen der Medizin und der Pharmakologie – und in Gustav Klimts berühmtem Bild der „Medizin“ (1900-1907) entrollt sich eine goldene Schlange sogar in gleicher Weise vom Ende der Wirbelsäule her wie in klassischen tantrischen Darstellungen. Bereits im Alten Testament streut Gott feurige Sch­langen unter das Volk Israel und straft seine Sünden mit deren Biss – den Moses wiederum mit der „Ehernen Schlange“ der Erleuchtung zu heilen versteht.

    Dass Martin dieses Erleuchtungsmoment wie schon beschrieben kompositorisch am oberen Bildrand immer ausspart, unterstreicht, dass er von keinerlei festgeschriebenem spirituellen Prinzip ausgeht, geschweige denn von konkreten religiösen Konzepten, um deren Repräsentation er sich Sorgen ma­chen würde. Zwar stellt „Untitled“ in der linken Schlangen- oder Flammenform geradezu schematisch die Reihung der Chakren und deren Verbindung miteinander dar (Wobei das erste Chakra mit der Bildunterkante, das siebte Chakra mit der Bildoberkante identisch ist – welche die weiße Linie jedoch nicht durchbricht, die nur vom ersten bis zum sechsten Chakra reicht und dann ihre Anbindung an die materielle Welt nicht überwindet, die von einer Horizontlinie symbolisiert wird). Zugleich aber zeigt die Anordnung weißer Punkte in den beiden schwarzen Formen weiter rechts einen geradezu ironischen Umgang mit der Energie-Metapher, machen sie doch vor allem einen unkoordiniert blub­bernden Eindruck (und überschreiten dabei spielend den Horizont!).

    Womit wir bei Martins Pilz-Bildern wären. Das älteste mir bekannte stammt von 1980-1981 („Psi­lozybin“). Bis heute aber findet sich das Motiv immer wieder. Wie die „Kundalini-Schlangen“ stehen auch Martins Pilze stets auf der Bildunterkante, ganz erwartungsgemäß wachsen sie aus dem Boden. In „Mushrooms“ (2004-2008) steigen ähnlich wie in „Untitled“ fünf orangerote Punkte den Stamm eines Pilzes hinauf bis in dessen Kopf. Darüber verteilen sich, luftig gesprayt, weiße Flecken wie Sporen in der Landschaft. Eine Gruppe weiterer Pilze wird rhizomatisch mit Linien verbunden. Über das ganze Bild perlen und hüpfen verschiedenfarbige Punkte, und Titel wie „Psilozybin“ lassen keinen Zweifel daran, was für Pilze das sind und woher der flirrende Wah­rnehmungseindruck kommt. Schließlich ist der Wirkstoff dafür bekannt, Lichter, Farben und Kontraste stark zu überhöhen und vibrieren zu lassen. Ähnlich wie bei LSD scheint das Bewusstsein entgrenzt. Wie im Tantra verschmilzt das Ich mit seiner Umwelt.

    Und wenn alchemistische Symbolik in Martins Werk seit jeher eine zentrale Rolle einnimmt (Zahlenmys­tik, Anagramme, Farbenlehre), so spielt sie auch auf das Wissen der Alchemisten um die psychische Wirkung chemischer Substanzen an und passt bestens zu Martins offensichtlichem Interesse für bewusstseinserweiternde Stoffe. Erleuchtung als Trip. In „Big Glitter Painting“ (2009-2010) wachsen die Pilze baumhoch und leuchten, nebst einer Wolke, neongelb und orange vor einem nächtlichen Himmel, der glitzert wie Kokainstaub. Das Motiv der „Spiritual Landscapes“ wiederholt sich diesmal in der psychedelischen Verschmelzung von Natur und Psyche, von innerer und äußerer Landschaft.

    AIN‘T IT FUNKY, 2003-2010

    Seit „Here“ 1986 programmatisch die Horizontlinie in Martins Werk einführt, etabliert diese immer wieder verschiedene Blick- und zugleich auch Sinnperspektiven. Mal liegt sie dabei hoch, mal tief im Bild, im Laufe der Jahre wandert sie aber vor allem an den unteren Bildrand, wo sie als gemalte Linie Pilzen, Kundali­ni-Schlangen und anderen Kompositionen Bodenhaftung gibt. Wie an „Dance“ zu sehen war, stellt sie in vielen Fällen Martins Malerei auf die Füße konkreter kultureller und sozialer Bezüge, denen sich der Künstler selbst nahe fühlt, die er bedenkt oder verehrt und in den energetischen Kontext einbindet, den seine Bilder in einer ungewöhnlichen, nämlich durch und durch profanen Magie beschwören.

    Seit 2006 häufen sich die Musikreferenzen in Martins Werk massiv. Der Künstler berichtet, der Tod James Browns im gleichen Jahr habe ihn in einer Weise betroffen gemacht, die ihn überrascht habe. Chris Martin wuchs in Washington als Kind einer weißen, elitären Familie auf, in einer Nachbarschaft in Georgetown, die heute von Alarmanlagen und Sicherheitspatrouillen so sehr strotzt, dass Martin sie genau deshalb als besonders gefährlich bezeichnet. Die in Washington traditionell starke schwarze Musikkultur des Soul und Funk be­deutete für den jungen Martin eine Öffnung seines bürgerlichen Horizonts, und die sozialen Emanzipationsbewegungen des Rap und Hip-Hop wurden zur Gegenkultur seiner eigenen Herkunft. In „Rev. Al In Mourning“ (2006-2007) strahlt aus der Mitte einer rau schwarz eingestrichenen Leinwand ein leuchtend weiß gefasster Zeitungsausschnitt, der James Brown und den Bürgerrechtler Reverend Al Sharp­ton 1982 beim Verlassen des Weißen Hauses zeigt. Gemeinsam wollten sie Präsident Ronald Reagan dazu bringen, den Geburtstag Martin Luther Kings zum Nationalfeiertag zu erklären. Reverend Al trägt schwarze Trauerkleidung.

    Martin hat seit 2006 James Brown viele Bilder gewidmet, von denen „Farewell Godfather of Soul...“ (2007) zu den schönsten zählt. Zweifach von einem Plattencover reproduziert, versinkt das Antlitz Browns, mit einem Blitz auf der Brust, in den Tiefen einer schwarzen Masse aus Ölfarbe, sekundiert von zwei zarten Wolken auf einem schmalen Streifen blauen Himmels. Die Verquickung von spiritueller Symbolik und politischer Thematik findet sich dann explizit in „Motown Music and the Astral Plane“ (2007-2008). Motown, das legendäre Detroiter Plattenlabel, gilt als ein Inbegriff schwarzer Emanzipation mit den Mitteln der Musik. Die Leinwand ist zu zwei Dritteln mit sieben Schallplatten von James Brown und Michael Jackson beklebt. Farbig schillernde Linien, mit denen die Platten rhizomatisch verbunden sind wie die Pilze auf „Mushrooms“, laufen auf ein oben im Bild hinter Plastikfolie isoliertes Buch zu, das den Titel „The Astral Plane“ trägt. 1895 erstmals erschienen, gibt der Autor Charles Webster Leadbeater darin eine Einführung in theosophisches Gedankengut, das er offen rassistisch nur Weißen für zugänglich hält. Brown und Jackson bündeln ihre Energien, um, wie es scheint, dieses Buch zu bannen und über den Bildrand hinaus in den Orbit zu schießen.

    Auch in „Ain‘t It Funky“ (2003-2010), einem Titelzitat des gleichnamigen Albums James Browns aus dem Jahre 1970, finden sich die Verbindungslinien zwischen sieben Schallplatten. Hier aber werden sie durch eincollagierte Bilder von rituellen Orten wie Tempelanlagen und von rituellen Handlun­gen ergänzt. Am Bildrand sind Reproduktionen von antiken Vasen, einem Waldbrand, einem postkubistischen Gemäl­de Picassos („Die drei Musikanten“, 1921) und dergleichen mehr zu sehen. Vom Rand der Leinwand her wölben sich diese Referenzbilder auf ihrer dramatisch farbigen Untermalung von allen Seiten wie ein Vorhang der schwarz grundierten Bildmitte zu und lassen sie als theatralisch inszenierten Ort erscheinen. Aus der Vertikale in die Horizontale gekippt, könnte die Leinwand auch jederzeit zu einer Tanzfläche werden, auf der einzelne Schritte wie in einer rituellen Choreografie vorgezeichnet sind. Zwar ist auch die untere Horizontlinie noch da, Martin umfasst aber die komplexe energetische Konstellation im Zentrum mit einer nicht weniger komplex­en Rahmenhandlung, die das gesamte Gemälde umläuft. Das formale Bildgeschehen ist durchaus exzessiv, die Kontraste hart, die Pinselführung derb.

    Tatsächlich war der Funk James Browns, fußend auf westafrikanischen Traditionen, auf ekstatisch-rituelle Tan­zerlebnisse hin konzipiert, die nicht nur Grenzen zwischen Publikumsraum und Bühne oftmals verwischten, sondern auch die Körperwahrnehmung im Fluss mit der Musik aufhoben – und zur rhythmischen Verschmelzung des Ichs mit seinem Außen animierten. Mit „Ain‘t It Funky“ unterstreicht Chris Martin erneut und besonders unmissverständlich seine Suche nach spiritueller Dynamik inmitten kultureller Praxen, Objekte und Symbole verschiedenster Provenienz, die seine Bilder hierarchielos zusammenbinden, und inmitten einer sozialen Welt, der sich seine Malerei emphatisch verpflichtet fühlt: mal andächtig, mal solidarisch, mal kritisch. Jüngst greift er verstärkt die Kunst der sogenannten „self-taught-artists“ aus dem Süden der USA auf, die politisch weniger korrekt auch „outsider-artists“ genannt werden. Sie leben am Rande der amerikanischen Wohlstandsgesellschaft und formen aus deren Müll Skulpturen und Bilder, die afrikanischen Plastiken und Kultobjekten nahestehen. Was im Reich elitärer Ästhetik abschätzig „Folklore“ genannt wird, gewichtet Martin höher als die kanonisi­erten Feierlichkeiten der sogenannten Hochkultur.

    Die Vergänglichkeit des Moments, des Körpers, der Identität, das Flüchtige der Existenz an der Schwelle zum Tod, die Nichtigkeit des Materiellen, das sind die großen Themen in Martins Œuvre. Das wichtigste aber scheint mir, dass er diese Endlichkeit an keiner Stelle bejammert, sondern sie stattdessen bejaht. Im Frühwerk geschieht dies sicher noch ehrfürchtiger als im späteren Werk, das den Respekt vor der Thematik nicht verliert, es aber weniger generell und vor allem: immer weniger abstrakt auffasst. Im Titel dieses Textes habe ich mich für den Begriff „Spirituelle Abstraktion“ entschieden, womit ich primär einen Genrebegriff für diejenige Malerei meine, die sich seit Hilma Af Klint mit nichtrepräsentationalen Mitteln metaphysischen Inhalten widmet. Tatsächlich – und das versuchte ich zu zeigen – ist Martins Malerei in hohem Maße in der Physis verankert, man­chmal geradezu comichaft figurativ, und hat den großen Vorzug, sich keinerlei metaphysischem Konzept zu unterwerfen. Sie steht mit beiden Beinen in der sozialen Wirklichkeit ihres Autors, der sich gleichwohl als Subjekt seines Werkes kaum je selbst ins Spiel bringt.

    Spiritualität hat in Martins Kunst allem voran eine empathische, ja solidarische Qualität. 2008 beendet Chris Martin ein Bild, das an seiner Unterkante die Inschrift trägt: „A painting for the protec­tion of Amy Winehouse“ („For Amy Winehouse“, 2004-2008). Rings um ein Portrait der unter Alkohol- und Drogensucht leidenden Sängerin drapiert Martin einen Schutzwall aus Zeitungspapier, Stoff und Haushaltsrolle, umzingelt von Glubschaugen, Symbolen der gierigen Blicke der Öffentlichkeit. Er hat ihr eine Zucker­stange ins Bild geklebt. Nach Winehouses Tod 2011 wirkt sie wie eine Grabbeigabe.

  • The Coming Takeover For a decoupling of the power to define cultural policy and cultural administration
  • Zehn Schöne Inseln. Die Binnengrenzen des Kunstfeldes. Ein Beschreibungsmodell
  • opting Out of ART. A THEORETICAL FOUNDATION
Close