Uncheck the box to avoid the aggregation and analysis of your behaviour data collected on this website. Done
Looking for something specific?
Just start typing anywhere to search anything.

Yours, KOW
DeutschEnglish

Text by Alexander Koch

For a long time, the history of abstraction in art was primarily a history of aesthetic essentialism: of the belief that a certain systematic order of forms would necessarily be capable of capturing the very essence of things and their manifestations and to organize them in the creative process such that something universal, something true, something definite could be said about them. Something that would rise above the here and now of the concrete environments of life.

With regard to the use of linguistic signs, the American pragmatist Richard Rorty has described this belief as the quest of (especially Western) thought for “final vocabularies,” his label for the longing for timeless formulas of knowledge and the hope for ultimate certitude.(1) What Santiago Sierra and Richard Rorty have in common is that they abandoned this hope, this need to control the world by conceiving it as an immutable and readily comprehensible place. Both resolved to harbor a different hope, one they saw as more fundamental: that the world could become a more just place than it currently is, and that what needs to be brought under control are the conditions that are the reason why it is the way it is. It was clear to Rorty that philosophy would have little to contribute to this undertaking. Sierra, for his part, has no more faith in the power of art. Yet both, each working in his discipline, radically politicized the question of what we can know and how the tokens of this knowledge may be organized, trading the interest in truth for an interest in self-determination and solidarity.

Readers who are familiar with Santiago Sierra’s art may be surprised to see it associated with a passion for solidarity; some think of it as rather noisy. Still, I believe that the concept of abstraction can in fact help us define the primary thrust of Sierra’s art more closely, and that Richard Rorty’s philosophical and political anti-essentialism may serve to circumscribe Santiago’s very clear-cut and trenchant ethical position and ultimately to describe the principle of solidarity in his art. That will be the concern of the following discussion.

***

Minimal art marked a turning point in the evolution of aesthetic abstraction. Distancing themselves from the heavy emphasis on the register of subjective emotion in abstract expressionism, the minimalists adopted standardized forms and materials from industrial mass production that, they believed, provided a rational vocabulary behind which the authors’ creative subjectivity would disappear; a process Sierra seems both deeply attached to and repelled by. On the one hand, it built a direct formal access for art to the anonymous principles of the world of standardized labor and commodities Sierra is interested in. On the other hand, the minimalists refused to accept any responsibility for the content, and a fortiori the political significance, of its arrangements, categorically blanking out their social context and arriving at an essentialist concept of the work. Looking at, say, a cube, they wanted to see nothing but its formal and indeed mathematical logic, a geometric body that is nothing but what it is.

Rorty had rejected this same stance—the recourse to the intrinsic qualities of a thing—as the compulsive notion that the right means of reason would make it possible to say something absolute about it, something that would be more than merely a historical and contingent description offered by a subject. This sort of whisper of eternity pervades minimalism as well as parts of analytic philosophy, whose formal logic Rorty came to feel was a retreat into the ivory tower. He accordingly proposed that, instead of sending our reason in pursuit of eternal propositions, we ought to apply it to the question of how we might limit human cruelty and how we might ultimately complete “the Enlightenment project of demystifying human life, by ridding humanity of the constricting ‘ontotheological’ metaphors of past traditions, and thereby replacing the power relations of control and subjugation inherent in these metaphors with descriptions of relations based on tolerance and freedom."(2)

Sierra similarly saw the self-referential aesthetic of Minimal art as “an egregious presumption and self-satisfaction on the part of Western culture” from which he distanced himself by highlighting the cruelties its rationality concealed. In the formal vocabulary of minimalism, whose objectivist rhetoric flattened individuality, he found the suitable set of tools to pin down the dehumanized abstractions of capitalism. In so doing, he at once also substantially expanded the object range that vocabulary put at his disposal: his sculptures and actions make recourse not only to formal and material principles of industrial production but, from the very outset, also to the logistical procedures of goods traffic, the repressive organization of dependent employment relations, social normalization and exclusion by force of legislative, judiciary, and executive power, and most importantly, the integration of amoral interests by virtue of their economic, political, and technological standardization and legitimization.

Sierra uses the capacity for formal abstraction generated by his minimalism-inspired practice not to elevate his art above the historical contingency and the feelings of split and subjugated subjects, but to make their structural oppression unmistakably clear. “It’s not discovering empty vessels that’s interesting, but using them (…) and in that regard I’m in the same situation as many others who see minimalism as an arsenal of instruments they can avail themselves of but whose emptiness on the level of content they can’t bear."(3) Instead of modifying or criticizing minimalist ideologies, Sierra reproduces them, with the one difference that he fills their “emptiness” with social reality: with materials that occupied a clearly defined place within a contentious set of social circumstances, or with the bodies and lives of people whose physical and mental stigmatization, segregation, lack of freedom, and exploitation is not his fault but that of a systemic logic he renders as disinterestedly as the minimalists did before him. But unlike the minimalists, he primarily aims his formal frame of reference at political and economic systems whose cruelty—as well as, sometimes, the resistance to it—his work appropriates.

***

A few examples from Santiago Sierra’s oeuvre:

PRISM. Workshop, Hamburg, Germany, 1990:
Early on in his artistic career, Sierra clarified several fundamental differences that set him apart from minimalist doctrine. For PRISM as well as CUBIC CONTAINER, created that same year, he built cubes whose typological lineage may be traced back to Donald Judd. Presenting one of Judd’s “Specific Objects” twice, both recumbent and standing up, would be sacrilegious, but Sierra’s photographs of PRISM deliberately show these two different states of one and the same object, categorically excluding pure self-reference. Judd placed such emphasis on the depersonalization of his works that, to his mind, any fingerprints left on them would destroy them. Sierra, by contrast, manufactures his spatial object out of a used truck tarp whose dirty surface bears the documentary marks of the distances it has travelled and the labor and processes of goods traffic.

WALKS. Hamburg, Germany, 1990:
In thirty-six pictures, Sierra’s first photographic series records eighteen situations the artist, then a student at the Hamburg academy, encountered as he roamed the urban space: stacks of pallets, stone slabs, and other construction supplies whose arrangement evokes the structural systematic order in the art of Carl Andre, Sol LeWitt, Donald Judd, and other representatives of minimalism. Yet Sierra’s found objects do not hew to the standard of rational uniformity. On the contrary, they illustrate how much the references to industrial production in minimalist formalism were idealized and stylized, whence minimalism was neither capable of nor interested in recognizing that the geometric standardization of industrial formats was more than anything else an economic rationality: the rationality of efficient manufacturing, transport, and construction processes to which the workers charged with executing them were compelled to adapt. Every one of Sierra’s found motifs documents a divergence from this rationality, an interference between the demands of productivity on the one hand and a subtly resistant subjectivity on the other hand, that submits to the diktat of formalism only just as much as necessary. Like PRISM, WALKS programmatically presents each object from two different points of view, contradicting, on the level of perception as much as presentation, the minimalist essentialism with its belief in its independence of the individual angle from which it viewed a given object.

250 CM LINE TATTOOED ON 6 PAID PEOPLE. Espacio Aglutinador, Havana, Cuba, December 1999; HIRING AND ARRANGEMENT OF 30 WORKERS IN RELATION TO THEIR SKIN COLOR. Project Space, Kunsthalle Wien, Vienna, Austria, September 2002:
Santiago Sierra paid six unemployed young men 30 dollars each for allowing him to tattoo a line across their backs. For a total length of 250 cm, Sierra arranged six backs side by side and had a horizontal tattoo drawn across them. Buying a human person’s body for 30 dollars for the execution of a work of art that will presumably be of limited interest to that person but whose trace he will not be able to shed off for the rest of his life seems a perverse thing to do. So does a second work created in 2002, HIRING AND ARRANGEMENT OF 30 WORKERS IN RELATION TO THEIR SKIN COLOR. Sierra had the Kunsthalle Wien hire thirty workers, men and women, with lighter as well as darker skins, sorted them by the tone of their skin, and lined them up, faces to the wall, dressed in nothing but underwear. The two works made in 1999 and 2002 have in common that each subjects human bodies to abstract formal principles that negate their individuality at the price of what would seem to be inadequate compensation—principles that may be found in minimalist and Conceptual art practices no less than in everyday practices of social normalization, segregation, and stigmatization. Sierra appropriates the former in order to render a compressed reproduction of the latter. In this sense, his approach is perfectly conventional and at bottom nothing more than an application of found social and aesthetic patterns which nonetheless become intolerable in combination.

Richard Rorty hoped to rid “humanity of the constricting ‘ontotheological’ metaphors of past traditions” and thereby overcome “the power relations of control and subjugation inherent in these metaphors.” The two works by Sierra present a contribution that is apt to promote this Enlightenment project: his engagement with the aesthetic vocabulary of line and color scale renders an “ontotheological” reception intolerable. A hypothetical 250-cm line, he demonstrates, is, in its normative definition, not just a mathematical quantity or an artistic “idea”—in a world inhabited by human beings, it implies preconditions and consequences that may be and indeed are painful. Similarly, the subdivision of perceptual space into scales of graduated color is much more than a purely formal systematic order at the moment such scales meet their analogues in social hierarchies that sort human beings in accordance with criteria of racial and national backgrounds.

WORKERS WHO CANNOT BE PAID, REMUNERATED TO REMAIN INSIDE CARDBOARD BOXES. Kunst Werke, Berlin, Germany, September 2000:
Six tall cubic units, improvised cardboard constructions, arranged in a row. Inside, seated on chairs and invisible from the outside, six people, classified by the title as workers who cannot be paid and yet are remunerated to quietly remain inside these pods, six hours a day, for six weeks. The Czech immigrants could not be paid because, as asylum applicants, they were prohibited by German law from accepting wages, and so they received an informal compensation for the time they gave to the project. Notably, the title of Sierra’s work describes these persons as workers, not as asylum applicants. So Sierra in no way calls their desire to work in question; what prevents them from working is their legal status, which Sierra circumvents by invisibly rewarding them for their performance as part of his action. Responding to this and similar actions, the press liked to insinuate that Sierra cruelly took advantage of the distress the people he exhibited were in.

In a more sober assessment of what happens here, however, we cannot but note that Sierra reproduces an objective state of affairs. In their lives no less than in Sierra’s work, the persons he has hired find themselves in a normalized situation that closely confines their bodies and constrains their possible actions; there is nothing they can do but persevere and wait. The isolation in which they sit matches their social status. The fact that the art audience does not generally take a serious interest in them—or, to the extent that it does, only “abstractly,” as representatives of a critical social issue—is part of this situation. Few of those who saw the action had probably ever been as physically and perhaps emotionally close to an asylum applicant as they were at the moment they put their ears to one of the cardboard boxes in the exhibition to find out whether there really was someone in there, and then perhaps expressed their profound concern, or else their indignation, that there was. In rendering the six workers invisible to the audience by enclosing them in six cubes lined up in a row, Sierra’s arrangement is precisely realistic.

PERSON SAYING A PHRASE. New Street, Birmingham, Great Britain, February 2002:
The people who participate in Santiago Sierra’s actions are never extras; they are unfailingly members of the social group the particular work examines: workers, the unemployed, prostitutes, war veterans, Roma, Huichol, whites and blacks, women and men. In many instances, the title or subtitle of the work indicates that they were compensated for their participation in a project, often specifying the exact amount. (A complete catalogue raisonné of Sierra’s oeuvre may be found on his website at www.santiago-sierra.com, which serves as a hub for the documentation of his practice, making all necessary information on the individual projects publicly accessible.) The compensation Sierra offers is usually as little as the people he hires are willing to accept. There is probably no work that illustrates more clearly why that is so than PERSON SAYING A PHRASE. In a Birmingham street, Sierra has a man who is presumably homeless and certainly poor repeat a sentence the artist dictates to him on camera: “My participation in this piece could generate seventy-two thousand dollars profit, I am paid five pounds.” Sierra articulates the exploitative relation at the heart of the work or has it articulated.

The disparity between the two sums is glaring, as is the fact that the man pronounces this truth under duress. At the end of the one-minute video recording, he appears appropriately bewildered; it is fairly evident that he had not known which sentence he would be paid five pounds to pronounce. Sierra’s action formally resembles the widely established instant polling and candid camera television formats for which people are aggressively accosted in the street. And it is a performative act of exploitation that is possible only on the basis of a capitalist value-added chain in which the final price a product—in this instance, a work of art by Sierra—fetches can be completely uncoupled from the real investment in it; a just allocation of the profit is not part of the plan. Sierra here shows himself in the role of the exploiter, noting that “what is permitted in the world of art of course coincides with what is permitted in the world of capitalism. We share one and the same reality."

***

Most of the critics who have objected to the dubious moral quality of large parts of Sierra’s oeuvre have given insufficient thought to these circumstances; in particular, the reference to the techniques of minimalism, which is so pivotal for this art, has not been fully appreciated. The assessments of reviewers who have strongly disapproved of Sierra’s work have ranged from the diagnosis of a nihilistic attitude that knows not but to repeat social cruelties it is impotent to change to the charge of utter cynicism on the part of the artist, who is said to profit from the cruelty inflicted on others. Yet there are four things we need to understand before we make up our minds about his art:

1. Low wages designed to maximize profits and the social immiseration, exclusion, and marginalization of certain demographic groups, etc. are widely current and standardized everyday practices. Sierra’s approach differs from the social processes it structurally appropriates only in that it renders them in compressed form, and as art.

2. If presenting certain realities to the public “as art” without false bottoms and without any moral commentary is seen as “scandalous,” the inevitable implication is that the rendition of realities in the realm of aesthetics and within the confines of cultural institutions is regarded as illegitimate while the same realities are otherwise not just tolerated as normal but even generally accepted and practiced as the social standard. Only such standards are usually not directly visible as such precisely because they are, for many people and to a large extent, perceptible only as abstract social arrangements and not as a tangible reality of life. Money, moreover, it is an abstraction to begin with.

3. Santiago Sierra’s practice is documentary first and foremost. He registers real processes and captures them in suitable media of representation and storage. He is the waiter, not the cook. That people are willing, for example, to put themselves in humiliating situations for little pay is evidence not of Sierra’s unscrupulousness but of the fact that these people are prepared to suffer humiliation for money and do so not only at Sierra’s behest but, in many instances, in their daily lives, a fact that surely has its roots in the social circumstances in which they live and not in their masochism.

4. That the participants themselves feel that Sierra’s projects are unfair, exploitative, or straining is an assumption that should at least be verified. When I worked with war veterans whom Sierra hired to stand bashfully in a corner of an art space for several hours and days, my experience was the exact opposite. To quote one of them: “I am grateful to Sierra for this opportunity. Because this really is my life. It’s just that ordinarily no one’s interested in it. This thing here allows me to step out of that invisibility for once.” Another said: “But this is one truth. Because we do feel ashamed. I think it’s perfectly right to stand by that, even if doing so is difficult.” By quoting these statements, I do not mean to argue that the actors always identify with the actions they execute, and even if they did, we would have to ask to which extent they are conversant with the context in which they perform them. But we may also underestimate the awareness the actors have of their own situation as well as their solidarity with Sierra’s attempt to articulate it.

***

Richard Rorty became embroiled in a long-running debate with Habermas over whether the universality of human rights could be justified in ultimately essentialist terms; that was what Rorty thought Habermas was trying to do with the recourse to an “ideal communication situation” he believed to be illusory. Rorty himself took a position that many found hard to accept but that later received support from Chantal Mouffe: human rights cannot be justified, they are nothing more and nothing less than a way in which human beings agree to regulate they way they deal with each other, sharing the belief that cruelty of any kind is the worst humans can inflict on humans and so pledging to avoid doing so. The entire remaining political and cultural debate over human rights can then only be about what we think is cruel and what is not, who “we” are, and how this we may be extended to include groups of people who currently take a different view of the matter.

Rorty thus radically delegated the moral agreement between people to give a certain form to their coexistence to these people, refusing to recruit the aid of any other source of normative authority such as reason. He rejected the belief that human beings have something at the bottom of their hearts that renders them capable by nature of good and just action with the—programmatically anti-essentialist—remark that “there is nothing deep inside us except what we have put there ourselves."(4) That is why he thought that literature—and I extend his argument to include all arts—rather than transcendental rights were the best instrument to bring the struggles and sufferings of others home to people and to render cruelty so intolerable to them that avoiding it would truly mean something to them. Thinking one’s way into perspectives that are not one’s own as one engages with a work, feeling solidarity with others’ fates, empathizing with people one may not even understand: these, Rorty believed, were far more important for the humanist project than philosophical attempts to lay the foundations of a universal ethic.

As I see it, this position coincides exactly with the ethical stance Santiago Sierra’s work stakes out and the manner in which this stance finds its form. Sierra refuses to predetermine or even only suggest any moral perspective on the events he invokes with his art. In this regard, he adopts a core idea of minimalism, according to which the meaning of a work cannot be found within that work itself; it is only attributed to it in the course of the beholder’s active engagement with it. But Sierra radically politicizes this involvement of the beholder: by emptying his own practice of moral content, he delegates the judgment of its moral quality to the audience. The viewers of his actions, sculptures, films, and photographs find themselves confronted with cruelties they do not generally have to suffer themselves, at least not just now, and whose ethical justification they often cannot but feel to be highly questionable. They almost inevitably find themselves disagreeing vigorously with the work, which they may perceive as inimical, and tend to spontaneously and passionately side with individuals who are otherwise distant abstractions to them or express opposition to certain social and economic developments they do not generally take much offense at. What may initially appear to be a piece of artistic provocation in the end squarely aims at the construction of an emancipated viewer’s position and a negotiation over what we believe to be morally defensible or indefensible.(5)

Sierra’s social criticism by artistic means accordingly takes place not as the presentation of a critical—nor of a cynical—attitude on the part of the artist or his art, but as an imposition on the art audience: they are compelled to perceive the real exploitation, oppression, and humiliation of people that Sierra initiates in museums and galleries or during biennials as a conflict that disrupts the semblance of social harmony and necessitates the negotiation of different ethical standards—a negotiation that seems increasingly impossible today and yet constitutes the core of the political. To this end, Sierra, eschewing the classical and established path of abstraction, which leads from the specific to the universal, from a given human being or material to an overarching formula that subsumes the particular instance, chooses instead the inverse route, setting out from the really existing abstractions at the heart of social normality, which he applies directly to a concrete body and its emotions, to a real life and its time, to a specific personal history and its consequences.

Sierra regards social violence not as a departure from what is socially opportune, but as an expression of the normative form of power and the economic system we effectively support: capitalism and liberalism. He declares his solidarity with those who are taken

into account in the calculus of today’s world as mere sources sometimes of efficient labor and sometimes of disturbance, and demands recognition for the feelings and (lost) struggles of people whom our own economic and political order condemn to exactly the humiliating circumstances Sierra presents to us as such. But he denies his audience the absolution promised by a critical art that, while it enlightens us by denouncing repressive conditions, is impotent to change them. In so doing, he also disrupts the self-deception of the art scene, which likes to believe that it occupies a place that is exempt from these conditions.

To the extent that Sierra’s art is cruel, that is because abstractions are cruel at the moment they seize and control subjects or even negate them outright. And since art lacks all power to prevent practices of social cruelty, Sierra suggests, it can still associate its own aesthetic formalism with the sanctioned barbarism and offer onlookers an opportunity to distance themselves from it.

(1) Richard Rorty, “Contingency, Irony, and Solidarity“, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1989, 3 ff.

(2) Edward Grippe, “Richard Rorty (1931–2007)”, Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy (http://www.iep.utm.edu/rorty/).

(3) Quoted in Gabriele Mackert and Gerald Matt, “Santiago Sierra”, exh. cat., Kunsthalle Wien project space, Vienna, 2002

(4) Richard Rorty, “Consequences of Pragmatism”, University of Minnesota Press, Minneapolis, 1982.

(5) Claire Bishop has accordingly discussed Sierra (as well as Thomas Hirschhorn) as a key figure of a concept of relational aesthetics turned political and indeed democratic in the proper sense of the word. Clearly distinguishing his work from Nicolas Bourriaud’s warm and fuzzy notion of social interaction, Bishop, drawing on the work of Mouffe and Laclau, emphasizes that the principle of a democratic social order consists not in consensus and harmony, but in the understanding that many of our views are incompatible and that this incompatibility is in fact legitimate. Sierra, Bishop argues, renders relational antagonisms visible that the semblance of social harmony suppresses, and so creates a concrete basis on which to rethink our relation to the world and to ourselves. See Claire Bishop, “Antagonism and Relational Aesthetics,” October 110 (Fall 2004), 51–79.

Abstraktion aus Notwehr. Santiago Sierras solidarische Grausamkeit
Text by Alexander Koch

Lange war Abstraktion in der Kunst vor allem eine Geschichte des ästhetischen Essentialismus: des Glaubens, eine bestimmte Systematik der Formen müsse in der Lage sein, das Wesen der Dinge und ihrer Erscheinungen so grundsätzlich zu erfassen und bildnerisch anzuordnen, dass sich etwas Allgemeines, etwas Wahres, etwas Letztes darüber würde sagen lassen. Etwas, das sich aus dem Hier und Jetzt einer konkreten Lebenswelt erhebt.

Diesen Glauben hatte Richard Rorty mit Blick auf die Verwendung sprachlicher Zeichen als die Suche des (v. a. westlichen) Denkens nach „abschließenden Vokabularen“ bezeichnet.(1) Der amerikanische Pragmatist verstand darunter die Sehnsucht nach zeitlosen Formeln der Erkenntnis, die Hoffnung auf letzte Gewissheit. Santiago Sierra und Richard Rorty ist gemeinsam, dass sie diese Hoffnung aufgaben, dieses Bedürfnis, die Welt als einen unveränderlich überschaubaren Ort begreifen zu müssen. Beide haben sich für eine andere, in ihren Augen fundamentalere Hoffnung entschieden, dass nämlich die Welt ein gerechterer Ort werden könnte als sie es derzeit ist – und dass es diejenigen Verhältnisse zu ändern gälte, die Ungerechtigkeit hervorbringen. Dass die Philosophie dazu wenig beitragen würde, war für Rorty ausgemacht. Sierra traut seinerseits der Kunst nicht mehr zu. Trotzdem haben beide innerhalb ihrer jeweiligen Disziplin die Frage danach, was wir erkennen können und wie sich die Zeichen dieser Erkenntnis organisieren lassen, radikal politisiert und das Interesse an Wahrheit eingetauscht gegen ein Interesse an Selbstbestimmung und Solidarität.

Kenner des Werkes von Santiago Sierra mag überraschen, eine solidarische Passion damit verknüpft zu sehen, gilt es doch manchen eher als krawallig. Ich glaube, gerade der Begriff der Abstraktion kann erhellen, welches Ziel Sierras Kunst verfolgt, und Richard Rortys philosophischer und politischer Anti-Essentialismus scheint mir dabei geeignet, die äußerst klare und scharfe ethische Position Sierras zu kennzeichnen und letztlich das Solidaritätsprinzip seines Werkes zu beschreiben. Das wird das Interesse dieses Textes sein.

***

Für den Fortgang ästhetischer Abstraktion markierte die Minimal Art eine Wende. In Abgrenzung zur starken Betonung subjektiver Gefühlswelten im Abstrakten Expressionismus fanden die Minimalisten in standardisierten Formen und Materialien aus der industriellen Massenproduktion ein rationales Vokabular, hinter dem die gestalterische Subjektivität der Autoren verschwinden konnte. Ein Vorgang, für den Sierra eine Art Hass-Liebe zu empfinden scheint. Denn einerseits erschloss sich der Kunst dabei ein formaler Direktzugang zu den anonymen Prinzipien einer standardisierten Arbeits- und Warenwelt, denen Sierras Interesse gilt. Andererseits lehnte der Minimalismus jegliche Verantwortung für die inhaltliche und zumal politische Bedeutung seiner Anordnungen ab, blendete ihren gesellschaftlichen Kontext kategorisch aus und kam zu einem essentialistischen Werkbegriff, der etwa in einem Kubus allein dessen formale, ja, mathematische Logik erkennen wollte, einen geometrischen Raumkörper, der nichts ist als nur er selbst.

Genau diese Haltung des Rekurses auf die intrinsischen Eigenschaften einer Sache hatte Rorty abgelehnt als die Zwangsvorstellung, mit den geeigneten Vernunftmitteln würde sich darüber etwas Absolutes sagen lassen, etwas, das mehr wäre als nur eine historische und kontingente Beschreibung durch ein Subjekt. Ein solches Raunen der Ewigkeit durchzieht den Minimalismus ebenso wie Teile der Analytischen Philosophie, deren formale Logik Rorty zunehmend als weltfremd empfand. Er schlug daher vor, wir sollten unsere Vernunft nicht auf die Suche nach ewigen Aussagen schicken, sondern sie auf die Frage verwenden, wie wir menschliche Grausamkeit begrenzen könnten und wie sich schließlich „das aufklärerische Projekt der Entmystifizierung des menschlichen Lebens“ vervollständigen ließe, „die Menschheit aus den Fesseln ‚ontotheologischer‘ Metaphern vergangener Traditionen zu befreien und so die Machtbeziehungen von Kontrolle und Unterwerfung, die diesen Metaphern innewohnen, zu ersetzen durch die Beschreibung von Beziehungen, die auf Toleranz und Freiheit aufbauen.“(2)

Vergleichbar sieht Sierra in der selbstbezüglichen Ästhetik der Minimal Art „eine ungeheure Anmaßung und Selbstzufriedenheit der westlichen Kultur“ und setzt sich von ihr ab, indem er die Grausamkeiten hervorhebt, die sich hinter ihrer Rationalität verbergen. Im formalen Vokabular des Minimalismus, dessen objektivistische Rhetorik Individualität nivellierte, findet er das geeignete Instrumentarium, um die entmenschlichten Abstraktionen des Kapitalismus dingfest zu machen. Dabei erweitert er zugleich substanziell den über dieses Vokabular erreichbaren Gegenstandsbereich: Seine Skulpturen und Aktionen rekurrieren nicht nur auf formale und materielle Prinzipien der Industrieproduktion, sondern von Beginn an auch auf die logistischen Abläufe des Güterverkehrs, auf die repressive Organisation abhängiger Beschäftigungsverhältnisse, auf soziale Normierung und Ausgrenzung mittels legislativer, judikativer und exekutiver Gewalt und vor allem auf die Integration amoralischer Interessen durch deren wirtschaftliche, politische und technologische Standardisierung und Legitimation.

Sierra nutzt die formalen Abstraktionsleistungen seiner am Minimalismus geschulten Praxis nicht, um sich über die historische Kontingenz und die Gefühle zerspaltener und unterworfener Subjekte zu erheben, sondern um deren strukturelle Unterdrückung unmissverständlich zu machen. „Nicht leere Gefäße zu entdecken ist das Interessante, sondern sie zu verwenden (...), und damit befinde ich mich in derselben Situation wie viele andere, die den Minimalismus als ein Arsenal von Instrumenten sehen, deren sie sich bedienen können, aber seine inhaltliche Leere nicht ertragen.“(3) Anstatt minimalistische Ideologien abzuwandeln oder zu kritisieren, reproduziert Sierra sie, mit dem einzigen Unterschied, dass er ihre „Leere“ mit sozialer Realität füllt: mit Materialien, die klar innerhalb einer gesellschaftlichen Problematik zu verorten sind, oder mit den Körpern und Leben von Menschen, deren physische und mentale Stigmatisierung, Segregation, Unfreiheit und Ausbeutung nicht ihm, sondern einer systemischen Logik anzulasten ist, die er ebenso unbeteiligt wiedergibt wie es zuvor die Minimalisten taten. Nur mit dem Unterschied, dass er anders als diese seinen formalen Bezugsrahmen vor allem auf politische und ökonomische Systeme ausrichtet, deren Grausamkeit – und manchmal auch den Widerstand dagegen – sein Werk appropriiert.

***

Einige Beispiele aus dem Werk Santiago Sierras:

PRISM. Workshop, Hamburg, Deutschland, 1990:
Am Beginn seines Frühwerkes klärte Sierra einige grundlegende Differenzen mit der minimalistischen Doktrin. Mit PRISM, ebenso wie mit CUBIC CONTAINER aus dem gleichen Jahr, baute er Kuben, die sich typologisch auf Donald Judd zurückführen lassen. Während es ein Sakrileg wäre, eines von Judds „Spezifischen Objekten“ einmal liegend und einmal stehend zu präsentieren, zeigen Sierras Fotografien von PRISM gezielt diese beiden unterschiedlichen Zustände ein und desselben Objekts und schließen damit reine Selbstbezüglichkeit kategorisch aus. Die Entpersönlichung seiner Werke trieb Judd so weit, dass er Fingerabdrücke darauf als ihre Zerstörung empfand. Sierra hingegen stellt seinen Raumkörper aus einer gebrauchten LKW-Plane her, in deren schmutziger Oberfläche sich die zurückgelegten Wegstrecken und Arbeitsprozesse im Warentransfer dokumentierten, Fingerabdrücke inklusive.

WALKS. Hamburg, Deutschland, 1990:
Sierras erste fotografische Serie hält in 36 Bildern 18 Situationen fest, die der damalige Student an der Hamburger Akademie bei Spaziergängen im Stadtraum vorfand: Stapel von Paletten, Steinplatten und anderen Baumaterialien, deren Anordnung die strukturelle Systematik von Carl Andre, Sol LeWitt, Donald Judd und weiteren Vertretern der Minimal Art wachruft. Dem rationalen Gleichmaß von deren Werken folgen Sierras Fundstücke freilich nicht. Sie zeigen gerade umgekehrt, wie sehr der minimalistische Formalismus seine Bezüge zur industriellen Produktion idealisierte und stilisierte – und folglich weder in der Lage war noch ein Interesse daran hatte, in der geometrischen Standardisierung industrieller Maße eine vor allem ökonomische Rationalität effizienter Fertigungs-, Transport- und Konstruktionsprozesse zu erkennen, in welche sich die ausführenden Arbeiter einzufügen hatten. Jedes der von Sierra vorgefundenen Motive dokumentiert eine Abweichung von dieser Rationalität als Interferenz von Produktivitätsanforderungen einerseits und einer subtil widerständigen Subjektivität andererseits, die sich nur so weit ins formale Diktat fügt wie eben nötig. Wie schon PRISM bietet auch WALKS programmatisch je zwei verschiedene Perspektiven auf ein und denselben Gegenstand und widerspricht so auf der Wahrnehmungs- ebenso wie auf der Darstellungsebene dem minimalistischen Essentialismus, der sich von der individuellen Blickrichtung auf das Gegebene unabhängig wähnte.

250 CM LINE TATTOOED ON 6 PAID PEOPLE. Espacio Aglutinador, Havanna, Kuba, Dezember 1999; HIRING AND ARRANGEMENT OF 30 WORKERS IN RELATION TO THEIR SKIN COLOR. Project Space, Kunsthalle Wien, Österreich, September 2002:
Santiago Sierra zahlte sechs arbeitslosen jungen Männern je 30 Dollar, damit sie sich eine Linie auf den Rücken tätowieren ließen. Um eine Gesamtlänge von 250 cm zu erreichen, stellte Sierra sechs Rücken zusammen und ließ eine horizontale Tätowierung über sie legen. Den Körper eines Menschen für 30 Dollar zu kaufen für die Ausführung eines Kunstwerkes, das ihn vermutlich nur bedingt interessiert, dessen Spur er aber sein Leben lang nicht mehr loswerden wird, erscheint pervers. Ebenso wie eine zweite Arbeit aus dem Jahr 2002, HIRING AND ARRANGEMENT OF 30 WORKERS IN RELATION TO THEIR SKIN COLOR. Sierra ließ von der Wiener Kunsthalle 30 Arbeiterinnen und Arbeiter mit helleren und dunkleren Hautfarben anheuern, sortierte sie gemäß der Tönung ihrer Haut und platzierte sie in Unterwäsche mit dem Gesicht zur Wand. Den beiden Werken von 1999 und 2002 ist gemeinsam, dass sie menschliche Körper jeweils abstrakten formalen Prinzipien unterwerfen, die ihre Individualität zum Preis einer unangemessen scheinenden Entlohnung negieren – Prinzipien, die sich in minimalistischen und konzeptuellen Kunstpraxen ebenso finden wie in alltäglichen Praxen sozialer Normierung, Segregation und Stigmatisierung. Erstere macht sich Sierra zu eigen, um Letztere komprimiert zu reproduzieren. Seine Vorgehensweise ist so gesehen überaus gewöhnlich und geradezu nicht mehr als eine Anwendung vorgefundener sozialer und ästhetischer Muster, deren Kombination jedoch schwer erträglich ist.

Wenn Richard Rorty hoffte, die Menschen „von den Fesseln ‚ontotheologischer‘ Metaphern vergangener Traditionen zu befreien und so die Machtbeziehungen von Kontrolle und Unterwerfung, die diesen Metaphern innewohnen“, zu überwinden, so zeigen sich die beiden Arbeiten Sierras als geeigneter Beitrag, dieses aufklärerische Projekt voranzubringen. Denn sein Umgang mit dem ästhetischen Vokabular von Linie und Farbskala macht eine „ontotheologische“ Rezeption unerträglich. Eine angenommene Gerade von 250 cm Länge, so zeigt er, ist in ihrer normativen Begrenzung nicht lediglich eine mathematische Größe oder eine künstlerische „Idee“, sondern hat in einer von Menschen bewohnten Welt Bedingungen und Konsequenzen, die schmerzhaft sein können und es auch sind. Gleichermaßen ist die Aufteilung des Wahrnehmungsraums in Skalen der Farbabstufung weit mehr als eine rein formale Systematik, wenn solche Skalen eine Entsprechung in sozialen Hierarchien finden, die Menschen nach rassischen und nationalen Herkunftskriterien sortieren.

WORKERS WHO CANNOT BE PAID, REMUNERATED TO REMAIN INSIDE CARDBOARD BOXES. Kunst Werke, Berlin, Deutschland, September 2000:
Sechs aus Pappkarton improvisierte, hochformatige Kuben in Reihe gestellt. Darin auf einem Stuhl sitzend, von außen nicht sichtbar, sechs im Werktitel als Arbeiter klassifizierte Menschen, die nicht bezahlt werden können und doch dafür entlohnt werden, dass sie sechs Wochen lang täglich sechs Stunden im Inneren der Gehäuse still verbleiben. Bezahlt werden konnten die tschetschenischen Einwanderer deshalb nicht, weil ihnen die deutsche Gesetzgebung verbot, als Asylbewerber Lohn entgegenzunehmen, den sie also informell für ihre gegebene Zeit erhielten. Zu beachten ist, dass Sierra die Personen im Werktitel nicht als Asylbewerber bezeichnet, sondern als Arbeiter. Sierra stellt also keineswegs ihren Wunsch oder ihre Fähigkeit zu arbeiten infrage, sondern es ist ihr juristischer Status, der sie daran hindert und den Sierra hintergeht, indem er die im Rahmen seiner Aktion erbrachte Leistung unsichtbar entlohnt. Hier wie ihn ähnlichen Aktionen unterstellte die Presse gerne, Sierra würde die Notlage der Menschen ausnutzen, die er ausstellte, und dies sei grausam.

Beurteilt man das Geschehen aber sachlich, muss man festhalten, dass Sierra einen objektiven Zustand wiedergibt. Die engagierten Personen befinden sich – in ihrem Leben wie in Sierras Werk – in einer normierten Situation, die ihre Körper und ihren Handlungsspielraum eng umschließt und in der ihnen nichts weiter bleibt als auszuharren. Die Isolation, in der sie sitzen, entspricht ihrem sozialen Status. Dazu gehört auch, dass das Kunstpublikum sich in aller Regel nicht ernsthaft für sie interessiert – und wenn, dann wiederum nur „abstrakt“, als sozialkritisches Thema. Vermutlich waren nur wenige von denen, die die Aktion sahen, zuvor einem Asylbewerber physisch und ggf. emotional so nahe gekommen wie in dem Moment, als sie oder er in der Ausstellung an einem der Kartons lauschte, ob auch wirklich jemand darin saß, und sich dann vielleicht ergriffen oder auch empört darüber zeigte, dass es so war. Wenn Sierra die sechs Arbeiter in einer Reihung von sechs Kuben für sein Publikum unsichtbar macht und im Raum abkapselt, ist seine Anordnung exakt realistisch.

PERSON SAYING A PHRASE. New Street, Birmingham, Großbritannien, Februar 2002:
Die Menschen, die an Santiago Sierras Aktionen teilnehmen, sind niemals Statisten, sondern gehören ausnahmslos der Personengruppe an, die das jeweilige Werk thematisiert: Arbeiter, Arbeitslose, Prostituierte, Kriegsveteranen, Roma, Huicholes, Weiße und Schwarze, Frauen und Männer. Zahlreiche Werke erwähnen im Titel oder Untertitel eine Bezahlung der Teilnehmer, oft wird auch die Höhe genannt. (Sierras Website www.santiago-sierra.com ist übrigens ein vollständiges Werkverzeichnis und ein zentrales Dokumentationsmedium seiner künstlerischen Praxis. Hier sind alle nötigen Informationen zu den einzelnen Projekten öffentlich zugänglich.) Sierras Bezahlung ist meist so gering wie die Personen bereit sind zu akzeptieren. Warum, macht wohl keine Arbeit so deutlich wie PERSON SAYING A PHRASE. Sierra lässt auf einer Birminghamer Straße einen Mann, der vermutlich obdachlos, jedenfalls arm ist, einen Satz nachsprechen, den der Künstler ihm vor laufender Kamera selbst diktiert: „My participation in this piece could generate seventy two thousand dollars profit, I am paid five pounds.“ Sierra spricht das Ausbeutungsverhältnis im Inneren seines Werkes selbst aus bzw. lässt es aussprechen.

Die Differenz zwischen den beiden Summen ist eklatant, die Nötigung des Mannes, diese Wahrheit zu sagen, ist es auch. Am Ende der einminütigen Videoaufzeichnung scheint er entsprechend konsterniert, zuvor offenbar nicht wissend, welchen Satz er gegen fünf Pfund zu sagen haben würde. Sierras Aktion gleicht in ihrer Form den Kurzbefragungen und Überrumpelungen von Menschen auf der Straße, die ein fester Bestandteil zahlreicher Fernsehformate sind. Und sie ist ein performativer Akt der Ausbeutung, der nur möglich ist aufgrund einer kapitalistischen Wertschöpfungskette, in welcher sich der erzielte Endpreis eines Produktes – hier eines Kunstwerkes von Sierra – von der realen Investition in dieses Produkt vollständig entkoppeln lässt und eine gerechte Aufteilung des Erlöses zwischen den an der Produktion beteiligten Akteuren nicht vorgesehen ist. Sierra zeigt sich hier selbst in der Rolle des Ausbeutenden und kommentiert: "Was in der Welt der Kunst erlaubt ist, deckt sich natürlich mit dem, was in der Welt des Kapitalismus erlaubt ist. Wir teilen uns ein und dieselbe Wirklichkeit." Da Sierra jedoch den gleichen Satz ausspricht wie sein Gegenüber, lässt die Spiegelung der beiden Aussagen mindestens symbolisch offen, ob nicht auch Sierra für seine Teilnahme an der Arbeit nur fünf Pfund erhält, oder zumindest seinerseits in einem Ausbeutungsverhältnis steht.

***

Wenn weite Teile des Werkes Santiago Sierras von zweifelhafter Moralität sind, so hat die Kritik daran diesen Umstand in der Vergangenheit meist unzureichend durchdacht und hat insbesondere die für dieses Werk so entscheidende Bezugnahme auf Verfahren des Minimalismus verkürzt dargestellt. Sofern sich diese Kritik ablehnend äußerte, reichte sie vom Konstatieren einer nihilistischen Haltung, die nichts anderes weiß als die sozialen Grausamkeiten zu wiederholen, an denen sie selbst nichts ändern kann, bis zum Vorwurf des blanken Zynismus aufseiten des Künstlers, aus dieser Grausamkeit zum Schaden anderer Profit zu schlagen. Es gilt aber, zunächst vier Dinge zu verstehen:

1. Die Zahlung niedriger Löhne zum Ziele der Profitmaximierung, die soziale Deklassierung, Verdrängung und Ausgrenzung bestimmter Bevölkerungsteile und dergleichen mehr sind weitläufig standardisierte Alltagspraxen. Sierras Vorgehen unterscheidet sich von den gesellschaftlichen Prozessen, die es strukturell appropriiert, allein dadurch, dass es sie komprimiert wiedergibt, und dies als Kunst.

2. Wenn es als ein „Skandal“ angesehen wird, gewisse Realitäten ohne doppelten Boden und ohne jede moralische Kommentierung der Öffentlichkeit „als Kunst“ vorzusetzen, kann das nur bedeuten, dass deren Wiedergabe im Reich der Ästhetik und innerhalb kultureller Institutionen als illegitim angesehen wird, während sie ansonsten als Norm nicht nur hingenommen, sondern ja allgemein anerkannt und als gesellschaftlicher Standard praktiziert werden. Nur dass man solche Standards in der Regel nicht unmittelbar sieht, und zwar gerade deshalb, weil sie für viele weitgehend nur als abstrakte Anordnungen des Sozialen wahrnehmbar sind, nicht als greifbare Lebenswirklichkeit. Im Falle des Geldes handelt es sich zudem um eine Abstraktion per se.

3. Santiago Sierras Praxis ist allem voran eine dokumentarische. Er registriert reale Vorgänge und hält sie in geeigneten Darstellungs- und Speichermedien fest. Er ist Kellner, nicht Koch. Dass etwa Menschen bereit sind, sich gegen geringe Bezahlung in erniedrigende Situationen zu begeben, belegt nicht Sierras Skrupellosigkeit, sondern die Bereitschaft dieser Menschen, sich für Geld erniedrigen zu lassen und dies nicht erst im Auftrag Sierras tun, sondern oftmals tagtäglich, was gewiss auf die gesellschaftlichen Umstände zurückzuführen ist, in denen sie leben, und nicht auf ihren Masochismus.

4. Dass die Mitspieler in Sierras Projekten diese selbst als unfair, ausbeuterisch oder belastend empfinden, ist eine Unterstellung, die zumindest überprüft werden müsste. In der Zusammenarbeit mit Kriegsveteranen, die sich im Auftrag Sierras für mehrere Stunden und Tage schamhaft in die Ecke eines Kunstraumes stellten, erlebte ich es genau umgekehrt. Zitat: „Ich bin Sierra dankbar für diese Möglichkeit. Denn das ist ja mein Leben. Normalerweise interessiert sich nur niemand dafür. Das hier gibt mir die Gelegenheit, einmal aus dieser Unsichtbarkeit herauszutreten.“ Und ein anderer sagte: „Das ist doch eine Wahrheit. Wir schämen uns doch. Ich finde es völlig richtig, dazu auch zu stehen, auch wenn das schwierig ist.“ Mit diesen Aussagen will ich nicht behaupten, es gäbe immer eine Identifikation der Akteure mit den ausgeführten Handlungen, und selbst dann wäre fraglich, wie weit sie mit dem Kontext vertraut sind, in dem sie diese vollziehen. Man unterschätzt aber ggf. das Bewusstsein der Akteure für ihre eigene Situation und auch ihre Solidarität mit Sierras Versuch, sie zu artikulieren.

***

Richard Rorty geriet mit Habermas in eine lange währende Auseinandersetzung darüber, ob sich die Universalität der Menschenrechte auf eine letztlich essentialistische Weise würden rechtfertigen lassen, was Rorty in Habermas’ Rekurs auf eine „ideale Kommunikationssituation“ gegeben sah, die er für illusorisch hielt. Rorty hingegen bezog eine für viele schwer akzeptierbare Position, die später auch von Chantal Mouffe gestützt wurde: Die Menschenrechte lassen sich durch nichts rechtfertigen, sie sind nicht mehr und nicht weniger als eine Weise, wie Menschen ihren Umgang miteinander gemeinsam abstimmen, dabei die Auffassung teilend, dass Grausamkeiten jeder Art das Schlimmste sind, was Menschen Menschen antun können, und sich also dazu verabreden, sie zu vermeiden. Die ganze übrige politische und kulturelle Debatte über die Menschenrechte kann dann nur noch darum geführt werden, was wir für grausam halten und was nicht, wer „wir“ sind und wie sich dieses Wir auf Personenkreise ausweiten lässt, die die Sache heute anders sehen.

Rorty delegierte damit die moralische Übereinkunft zwischen Menschen, ihrem Zusammenleben eine bestimmte Form zu geben, radikal an diese Menschen selbst und weigerte sich, dafür Hilfestellung von einer erhabeneren Instanz zu verlangen, zum Beispiel der Vernunft. Den Glauben daran, Menschen trügen etwas tief in sich, das sie von Natur aus zum guten und gerechten Handeln befähige, wies Rorty mit der – programmatisch anti-essentialistischen – Bemerkung zurück: „There is nothing deep inside us except what we have put there ourselves.“(4) Nicht in transzendentalen Rechten, sondern in der Literatur – und ich weite hier sein Argument auf alle Künste aus – sah er infolge das beste Instrument, um Menschen die Kämpfe und Leiden anderer nahezubringen und ihnen Grausamkeit so unerträglich zu machen, dass deren Vermeidung ihnen fortan wirklich etwas bedeuten könnte. Sich während der Rezeption eines Werkes in Perspektiven einzudenken, die gar nicht die eigenen sind, sich mit fremden Schicksalen zu solidarisieren, Empathie zu empfinden für Leute, die man vielleicht gar nicht versteht, erschien Rorty weitaus bedeutender für das humanistische Projekt als philosophische Begründungsversuche einer universalen Ethik.

Diese Position deckt sich in meinen Augen vollständig mit der ethischen Haltung, die Santiago Sierras Werk einnimmt, und mit der Weise, wie diese Haltung ihre Form findet. Sierra verweigert es, irgendeine moralische Haltung zu den Ereignissen vorzugeben oder auch nur zu suggerieren, die er künstlerisch aufruft. Dabei macht er sich einen Kerngedanken des Minimalismus zu eigen, wonach die Bedeutung eines Werkes nicht in diesem selbst zu finden sei, sondern durch die Eigenleistung von Betrachtern in dieses hineingelegt werde. Sierra politisiert diese aktive Betrachterposition indes drastisch: Indem er seine eigene Praxis moralisch entleert, delegiert er die Einschätzung von deren Moralität an die Rezipienten. Das Publikum seiner Aktionen, Skulpturen, Filme und Fotografien sieht sich mit Grausamkeiten konfrontiert, die es in der Regel nicht selbst erleiden muss, zumindest nicht gerade jetzt, und deren ethische Rechtfertigung es oftmals als hoch fragwürdig empfinden muss. Es gerät dabei fast zwangsläufig mit dem Werk in Konflikt, empfindet es vielleicht als feindselig und neigt dazu, spontan und leidenschaftlich Position für ihm sonst eher fernstehende Individuen zu beziehen oder bestimmte soziale und ökonomische Vorgänge abzulehnen, die ihm üblicherweise weniger aufstoßen. Was zunächst wie eine künstlerische Provokation erscheinen kann, zielt letztlich frontal auf die Konstruktion einer emanzipierten Betrachterposition und die Verhandlung dessen, was wir für moralisch vertretbar halten und was nicht.(5)

Sierras künstlerische Gesellschaftskritik vollzieht sich somit nicht als Darbietung einer kritischen und auch nicht einer zynischen Haltung des Künstlers oder seiner Kunst, sondern als Nötigung des Kunstpublikums, die Ausbeutung, Unterdrückung und Beschämung von Menschen, die Sierra in Museen, Galerien und auf Biennalen real initiiert, als einen Konflikt zu empfinden, der den Schein sozialer Harmonie zerbricht und jene Verhandlung unterschiedlicher ethischer Maßstäbe fordert, die heute immer weniger möglich scheint und doch den Kern des Politischen ausmacht. Dafür wählt Sierra gerade nicht den klassischen, üblichen Weg der Abstraktion als einen Weg vom Konkreten zum Allgemeinen, von einem gegebenen Menschen oder Material zu einer diesem übergeordneten Formel. Er nimmt statt dessen den umgekehrten Weg von real existierenden Abstraktionen inmitten der gesellschaftlichen Normalität und schließt sie kurz mit einem konkreten Körper und seinen Emotionen, mit einem realen Leben und seiner Zeit, mit einer spezifischen Herkunft und ihren Folgen.

Sierra betrachtet soziale Gewalt nicht als Abkehr von dem, was gesellschaftlich opportun ist, sondern als Ausdruck der von uns mitgetragenen normativen Herrschafts- und Wirtschaftsformen: Kapitalismus und Liberalismus. Er solidarisiert sich mit denen, die heute wahlweise als Effizienz- oder als Störfaktoren berechnet werden, und fordert die Anerkennung der Gefühle und der (verlorenen) Kämpfe der Menschen, die unsere eigenen wirtschaftlichen und politischen Ordnungen in eben jene beschämende Lage bringen, die Sierra uns als solche präsentiert. Jedoch verweigert er seinem Publikum die Absolution durch eine kritische Kunst, die repressive Verhältnisse aufklärerisch denunzieren, aber nicht ändern kann. Er unterbricht damit auch den Selbstbetrug der Kunstszene, die gerne glaubt, über einen Ort zu verfügen, der über diese Verhältnisse erhaben sei.

Sofern Sierras Kunst grausam ist, ist sie es, weil Abstraktionen grausam sind, sobald sie Subjekte erfassen und kontrollieren oder gleich negieren. Und da der Kunst jede Macht fehlt, Praxen sozialer Grausamkeit zu unterbinden, bleibt ihr nach Sierra doch, ihren eigenen ästhetischen Formalismus mit der sanktionierten Barbarei gemeinzumachen und Dritten eine Chance zu geben, sich davon zu distanzieren.

(1) Vergl. Richard Rorty, „Contingency, Irony, and Solidarity“, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge 1989, S. 3 ff.

(2) Edward Grippe, „Richard Rorty (1931–2007)“, Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy (http://www.iep.utm.edu/rorty/).

(3) Zitiert nach Gabriele Mackert und Gerald Matt, „Santiago Sierra“. Kunsthalle Wien project space, Wien: Kunsthalle Wien, 2002.

(4) Richard Rorty, “Consequences of Pragmatism”, University of Minnesota Press, Minneapolis 1982.

(5) Claire Bishop hat Sierra (wie auch Thomas Hirschhorn) daher als Schlüsselfigur eines politisch, ja, im eigentlichen Sinne demokratisch gewendeten Begriffs relationaler Ästhetik diskutiert. In unmissverständlicher Abgrenzung von Nicolas Bourriauds weichgespülter Vorstellung von sozialer Interaktion stellte Bishop mit Blick auf Mouffe und Laclau klar, dass nicht Konsens und Harmonie die Prinzipien einer demokratischen Gesellschaftsordnung bilden, sondern die Auffassung, dass viele unserer Ansichten unvereinbar sind und diese Unvereinbarkeit gleichwohl legitim ist. Sierra, so Bishop, mache relationale Antagonismen sichtbar, die der Schein sozialer Harmonie unterdrücke, und schaffe damit eine konkrete Ausgangsbasis dafür, unser Verhältnis zur Welt und zu uns selbst neu zu überdenken. Vgl. Claire Bishop, „Antagonism and Relational Aesthetics“, October 110 (Herbst 2004), S. 51–79.

  • FRANZ ERHARD WALTHERS‘ PARTICIPATORIAL MINIMALISM
  • Abstraction in Self-Defense. Santiago Sierra’s cruel solidarity
  • DeutschEnglish

    Text by Alexander Koch

    For a long time, the history of abstraction in art was primarily a history of aesthetic essentialism: of the belief that a certain systematic order of forms would necessarily be capable of capturing the very essence of things and their manifestations and to organize them in the creative process such that something universal, something true, something definite could be said about them. Something that would rise above the here and now of the concrete environments of life.

    With regard to the use of linguistic signs, the American pragmatist Richard Rorty has described this belief as the quest of (especially Western) thought for “final vocabularies,” his label for the longing for timeless formulas of knowledge and the hope for ultimate certitude.(1) What Santiago Sierra and Richard Rorty have in common is that they abandoned this hope, this need to control the world by conceiving it as an immutable and readily comprehensible place. Both resolved to harbor a different hope, one they saw as more fundamental: that the world could become a more just place than it currently is, and that what needs to be brought under control are the conditions that are the reason why it is the way it is. It was clear to Rorty that philosophy would have little to contribute to this undertaking. Sierra, for his part, has no more faith in the power of art. Yet both, each working in his discipline, radically politicized the question of what we can know and how the tokens of this knowledge may be organized, trading the interest in truth for an interest in self-determination and solidarity.

    Readers who are familiar with Santiago Sierra’s art may be surprised to see it associated with a passion for solidarity; some think of it as rather noisy. Still, I believe that the concept of abstraction can in fact help us define the primary thrust of Sierra’s art more closely, and that Richard Rorty’s philosophical and political anti-essentialism may serve to circumscribe Santiago’s very clear-cut and trenchant ethical position and ultimately to describe the principle of solidarity in his art. That will be the concern of the following discussion.

    ***

    Minimal art marked a turning point in the evolution of aesthetic abstraction. Distancing themselves from the heavy emphasis on the register of subjective emotion in abstract expressionism, the minimalists adopted standardized forms and materials from industrial mass production that, they believed, provided a rational vocabulary behind which the authors’ creative subjectivity would disappear; a process Sierra seems both deeply attached to and repelled by. On the one hand, it built a direct formal access for art to the anonymous principles of the world of standardized labor and commodities Sierra is interested in. On the other hand, the minimalists refused to accept any responsibility for the content, and a fortiori the political significance, of its arrangements, categorically blanking out their social context and arriving at an essentialist concept of the work. Looking at, say, a cube, they wanted to see nothing but its formal and indeed mathematical logic, a geometric body that is nothing but what it is.

    Rorty had rejected this same stance—the recourse to the intrinsic qualities of a thing—as the compulsive notion that the right means of reason would make it possible to say something absolute about it, something that would be more than merely a historical and contingent description offered by a subject. This sort of whisper of eternity pervades minimalism as well as parts of analytic philosophy, whose formal logic Rorty came to feel was a retreat into the ivory tower. He accordingly proposed that, instead of sending our reason in pursuit of eternal propositions, we ought to apply it to the question of how we might limit human cruelty and how we might ultimately complete “the Enlightenment project of demystifying human life, by ridding humanity of the constricting ‘ontotheological’ metaphors of past traditions, and thereby replacing the power relations of control and subjugation inherent in these metaphors with descriptions of relations based on tolerance and freedom."(2)

    Sierra similarly saw the self-referential aesthetic of Minimal art as “an egregious presumption and self-satisfaction on the part of Western culture” from which he distanced himself by highlighting the cruelties its rationality concealed. In the formal vocabulary of minimalism, whose objectivist rhetoric flattened individuality, he found the suitable set of tools to pin down the dehumanized abstractions of capitalism. In so doing, he at once also substantially expanded the object range that vocabulary put at his disposal: his sculptures and actions make recourse not only to formal and material principles of industrial production but, from the very outset, also to the logistical procedures of goods traffic, the repressive organization of dependent employment relations, social normalization and exclusion by force of legislative, judiciary, and executive power, and most importantly, the integration of amoral interests by virtue of their economic, political, and technological standardization and legitimization.

    Sierra uses the capacity for formal abstraction generated by his minimalism-inspired practice not to elevate his art above the historical contingency and the feelings of split and subjugated subjects, but to make their structural oppression unmistakably clear. “It’s not discovering empty vessels that’s interesting, but using them (…) and in that regard I’m in the same situation as many others who see minimalism as an arsenal of instruments they can avail themselves of but whose emptiness on the level of content they can’t bear."(3) Instead of modifying or criticizing minimalist ideologies, Sierra reproduces them, with the one difference that he fills their “emptiness” with social reality: with materials that occupied a clearly defined place within a contentious set of social circumstances, or with the bodies and lives of people whose physical and mental stigmatization, segregation, lack of freedom, and exploitation is not his fault but that of a systemic logic he renders as disinterestedly as the minimalists did before him. But unlike the minimalists, he primarily aims his formal frame of reference at political and economic systems whose cruelty—as well as, sometimes, the resistance to it—his work appropriates.

    ***

    A few examples from Santiago Sierra’s oeuvre:

    PRISM. Workshop, Hamburg, Germany, 1990:
    Early on in his artistic career, Sierra clarified several fundamental differences that set him apart from minimalist doctrine. For PRISM as well as CUBIC CONTAINER, created that same year, he built cubes whose typological lineage may be traced back to Donald Judd. Presenting one of Judd’s “Specific Objects” twice, both recumbent and standing up, would be sacrilegious, but Sierra’s photographs of PRISM deliberately show these two different states of one and the same object, categorically excluding pure self-reference. Judd placed such emphasis on the depersonalization of his works that, to his mind, any fingerprints left on them would destroy them. Sierra, by contrast, manufactures his spatial object out of a used truck tarp whose dirty surface bears the documentary marks of the distances it has travelled and the labor and processes of goods traffic.

    WALKS. Hamburg, Germany, 1990:
    In thirty-six pictures, Sierra’s first photographic series records eighteen situations the artist, then a student at the Hamburg academy, encountered as he roamed the urban space: stacks of pallets, stone slabs, and other construction supplies whose arrangement evokes the structural systematic order in the art of Carl Andre, Sol LeWitt, Donald Judd, and other representatives of minimalism. Yet Sierra’s found objects do not hew to the standard of rational uniformity. On the contrary, they illustrate how much the references to industrial production in minimalist formalism were idealized and stylized, whence minimalism was neither capable of nor interested in recognizing that the geometric standardization of industrial formats was more than anything else an economic rationality: the rationality of efficient manufacturing, transport, and construction processes to which the workers charged with executing them were compelled to adapt. Every one of Sierra’s found motifs documents a divergence from this rationality, an interference between the demands of productivity on the one hand and a subtly resistant subjectivity on the other hand, that submits to the diktat of formalism only just as much as necessary. Like PRISM, WALKS programmatically presents each object from two different points of view, contradicting, on the level of perception as much as presentation, the minimalist essentialism with its belief in its independence of the individual angle from which it viewed a given object.

    250 CM LINE TATTOOED ON 6 PAID PEOPLE. Espacio Aglutinador, Havana, Cuba, December 1999; HIRING AND ARRANGEMENT OF 30 WORKERS IN RELATION TO THEIR SKIN COLOR. Project Space, Kunsthalle Wien, Vienna, Austria, September 2002:
    Santiago Sierra paid six unemployed young men 30 dollars each for allowing him to tattoo a line across their backs. For a total length of 250 cm, Sierra arranged six backs side by side and had a horizontal tattoo drawn across them. Buying a human person’s body for 30 dollars for the execution of a work of art that will presumably be of limited interest to that person but whose trace he will not be able to shed off for the rest of his life seems a perverse thing to do. So does a second work created in 2002, HIRING AND ARRANGEMENT OF 30 WORKERS IN RELATION TO THEIR SKIN COLOR. Sierra had the Kunsthalle Wien hire thirty workers, men and women, with lighter as well as darker skins, sorted them by the tone of their skin, and lined them up, faces to the wall, dressed in nothing but underwear. The two works made in 1999 and 2002 have in common that each subjects human bodies to abstract formal principles that negate their individuality at the price of what would seem to be inadequate compensation—principles that may be found in minimalist and Conceptual art practices no less than in everyday practices of social normalization, segregation, and stigmatization. Sierra appropriates the former in order to render a compressed reproduction of the latter. In this sense, his approach is perfectly conventional and at bottom nothing more than an application of found social and aesthetic patterns which nonetheless become intolerable in combination.

    Richard Rorty hoped to rid “humanity of the constricting ‘ontotheological’ metaphors of past traditions” and thereby overcome “the power relations of control and subjugation inherent in these metaphors.” The two works by Sierra present a contribution that is apt to promote this Enlightenment project: his engagement with the aesthetic vocabulary of line and color scale renders an “ontotheological” reception intolerable. A hypothetical 250-cm line, he demonstrates, is, in its normative definition, not just a mathematical quantity or an artistic “idea”—in a world inhabited by human beings, it implies preconditions and consequences that may be and indeed are painful. Similarly, the subdivision of perceptual space into scales of graduated color is much more than a purely formal systematic order at the moment such scales meet their analogues in social hierarchies that sort human beings in accordance with criteria of racial and national backgrounds.

    WORKERS WHO CANNOT BE PAID, REMUNERATED TO REMAIN INSIDE CARDBOARD BOXES. Kunst Werke, Berlin, Germany, September 2000:
    Six tall cubic units, improvised cardboard constructions, arranged in a row. Inside, seated on chairs and invisible from the outside, six people, classified by the title as workers who cannot be paid and yet are remunerated to quietly remain inside these pods, six hours a day, for six weeks. The Czech immigrants could not be paid because, as asylum applicants, they were prohibited by German law from accepting wages, and so they received an informal compensation for the time they gave to the project. Notably, the title of Sierra’s work describes these persons as workers, not as asylum applicants. So Sierra in no way calls their desire to work in question; what prevents them from working is their legal status, which Sierra circumvents by invisibly rewarding them for their performance as part of his action. Responding to this and similar actions, the press liked to insinuate that Sierra cruelly took advantage of the distress the people he exhibited were in.

    In a more sober assessment of what happens here, however, we cannot but note that Sierra reproduces an objective state of affairs. In their lives no less than in Sierra’s work, the persons he has hired find themselves in a normalized situation that closely confines their bodies and constrains their possible actions; there is nothing they can do but persevere and wait. The isolation in which they sit matches their social status. The fact that the art audience does not generally take a serious interest in them—or, to the extent that it does, only “abstractly,” as representatives of a critical social issue—is part of this situation. Few of those who saw the action had probably ever been as physically and perhaps emotionally close to an asylum applicant as they were at the moment they put their ears to one of the cardboard boxes in the exhibition to find out whether there really was someone in there, and then perhaps expressed their profound concern, or else their indignation, that there was. In rendering the six workers invisible to the audience by enclosing them in six cubes lined up in a row, Sierra’s arrangement is precisely realistic.

    PERSON SAYING A PHRASE. New Street, Birmingham, Great Britain, February 2002:
    The people who participate in Santiago Sierra’s actions are never extras; they are unfailingly members of the social group the particular work examines: workers, the unemployed, prostitutes, war veterans, Roma, Huichol, whites and blacks, women and men. In many instances, the title or subtitle of the work indicates that they were compensated for their participation in a project, often specifying the exact amount. (A complete catalogue raisonné of Sierra’s oeuvre may be found on his website at www.santiago-sierra.com, which serves as a hub for the documentation of his practice, making all necessary information on the individual projects publicly accessible.) The compensation Sierra offers is usually as little as the people he hires are willing to accept. There is probably no work that illustrates more clearly why that is so than PERSON SAYING A PHRASE. In a Birmingham street, Sierra has a man who is presumably homeless and certainly poor repeat a sentence the artist dictates to him on camera: “My participation in this piece could generate seventy-two thousand dollars profit, I am paid five pounds.” Sierra articulates the exploitative relation at the heart of the work or has it articulated.

    The disparity between the two sums is glaring, as is the fact that the man pronounces this truth under duress. At the end of the one-minute video recording, he appears appropriately bewildered; it is fairly evident that he had not known which sentence he would be paid five pounds to pronounce. Sierra’s action formally resembles the widely established instant polling and candid camera television formats for which people are aggressively accosted in the street. And it is a performative act of exploitation that is possible only on the basis of a capitalist value-added chain in which the final price a product—in this instance, a work of art by Sierra—fetches can be completely uncoupled from the real investment in it; a just allocation of the profit is not part of the plan. Sierra here shows himself in the role of the exploiter, noting that “what is permitted in the world of art of course coincides with what is permitted in the world of capitalism. We share one and the same reality."

    ***

    Most of the critics who have objected to the dubious moral quality of large parts of Sierra’s oeuvre have given insufficient thought to these circumstances; in particular, the reference to the techniques of minimalism, which is so pivotal for this art, has not been fully appreciated. The assessments of reviewers who have strongly disapproved of Sierra’s work have ranged from the diagnosis of a nihilistic attitude that knows not but to repeat social cruelties it is impotent to change to the charge of utter cynicism on the part of the artist, who is said to profit from the cruelty inflicted on others. Yet there are four things we need to understand before we make up our minds about his art:

    1. Low wages designed to maximize profits and the social immiseration, exclusion, and marginalization of certain demographic groups, etc. are widely current and standardized everyday practices. Sierra’s approach differs from the social processes it structurally appropriates only in that it renders them in compressed form, and as art.

    2. If presenting certain realities to the public “as art” without false bottoms and without any moral commentary is seen as “scandalous,” the inevitable implication is that the rendition of realities in the realm of aesthetics and within the confines of cultural institutions is regarded as illegitimate while the same realities are otherwise not just tolerated as normal but even generally accepted and practiced as the social standard. Only such standards are usually not directly visible as such precisely because they are, for many people and to a large extent, perceptible only as abstract social arrangements and not as a tangible reality of life. Money, moreover, it is an abstraction to begin with.

    3. Santiago Sierra’s practice is documentary first and foremost. He registers real processes and captures them in suitable media of representation and storage. He is the waiter, not the cook. That people are willing, for example, to put themselves in humiliating situations for little pay is evidence not of Sierra’s unscrupulousness but of the fact that these people are prepared to suffer humiliation for money and do so not only at Sierra’s behest but, in many instances, in their daily lives, a fact that surely has its roots in the social circumstances in which they live and not in their masochism.

    4. That the participants themselves feel that Sierra’s projects are unfair, exploitative, or straining is an assumption that should at least be verified. When I worked with war veterans whom Sierra hired to stand bashfully in a corner of an art space for several hours and days, my experience was the exact opposite. To quote one of them: “I am grateful to Sierra for this opportunity. Because this really is my life. It’s just that ordinarily no one’s interested in it. This thing here allows me to step out of that invisibility for once.” Another said: “But this is one truth. Because we do feel ashamed. I think it’s perfectly right to stand by that, even if doing so is difficult.” By quoting these statements, I do not mean to argue that the actors always identify with the actions they execute, and even if they did, we would have to ask to which extent they are conversant with the context in which they perform them. But we may also underestimate the awareness the actors have of their own situation as well as their solidarity with Sierra’s attempt to articulate it.

    ***

    Richard Rorty became embroiled in a long-running debate with Habermas over whether the universality of human rights could be justified in ultimately essentialist terms; that was what Rorty thought Habermas was trying to do with the recourse to an “ideal communication situation” he believed to be illusory. Rorty himself took a position that many found hard to accept but that later received support from Chantal Mouffe: human rights cannot be justified, they are nothing more and nothing less than a way in which human beings agree to regulate they way they deal with each other, sharing the belief that cruelty of any kind is the worst humans can inflict on humans and so pledging to avoid doing so. The entire remaining political and cultural debate over human rights can then only be about what we think is cruel and what is not, who “we” are, and how this we may be extended to include groups of people who currently take a different view of the matter.

    Rorty thus radically delegated the moral agreement between people to give a certain form to their coexistence to these people, refusing to recruit the aid of any other source of normative authority such as reason. He rejected the belief that human beings have something at the bottom of their hearts that renders them capable by nature of good and just action with the—programmatically anti-essentialist—remark that “there is nothing deep inside us except what we have put there ourselves."(4) That is why he thought that literature—and I extend his argument to include all arts—rather than transcendental rights were the best instrument to bring the struggles and sufferings of others home to people and to render cruelty so intolerable to them that avoiding it would truly mean something to them. Thinking one’s way into perspectives that are not one’s own as one engages with a work, feeling solidarity with others’ fates, empathizing with people one may not even understand: these, Rorty believed, were far more important for the humanist project than philosophical attempts to lay the foundations of a universal ethic.

    As I see it, this position coincides exactly with the ethical stance Santiago Sierra’s work stakes out and the manner in which this stance finds its form. Sierra refuses to predetermine or even only suggest any moral perspective on the events he invokes with his art. In this regard, he adopts a core idea of minimalism, according to which the meaning of a work cannot be found within that work itself; it is only attributed to it in the course of the beholder’s active engagement with it. But Sierra radically politicizes this involvement of the beholder: by emptying his own practice of moral content, he delegates the judgment of its moral quality to the audience. The viewers of his actions, sculptures, films, and photographs find themselves confronted with cruelties they do not generally have to suffer themselves, at least not just now, and whose ethical justification they often cannot but feel to be highly questionable. They almost inevitably find themselves disagreeing vigorously with the work, which they may perceive as inimical, and tend to spontaneously and passionately side with individuals who are otherwise distant abstractions to them or express opposition to certain social and economic developments they do not generally take much offense at. What may initially appear to be a piece of artistic provocation in the end squarely aims at the construction of an emancipated viewer’s position and a negotiation over what we believe to be morally defensible or indefensible.(5)

    Sierra’s social criticism by artistic means accordingly takes place not as the presentation of a critical—nor of a cynical—attitude on the part of the artist or his art, but as an imposition on the art audience: they are compelled to perceive the real exploitation, oppression, and humiliation of people that Sierra initiates in museums and galleries or during biennials as a conflict that disrupts the semblance of social harmony and necessitates the negotiation of different ethical standards—a negotiation that seems increasingly impossible today and yet constitutes the core of the political. To this end, Sierra, eschewing the classical and established path of abstraction, which leads from the specific to the universal, from a given human being or material to an overarching formula that subsumes the particular instance, chooses instead the inverse route, setting out from the really existing abstractions at the heart of social normality, which he applies directly to a concrete body and its emotions, to a real life and its time, to a specific personal history and its consequences.

    Sierra regards social violence not as a departure from what is socially opportune, but as an expression of the normative form of power and the economic system we effectively support: capitalism and liberalism. He declares his solidarity with those who are taken

    into account in the calculus of today’s world as mere sources sometimes of efficient labor and sometimes of disturbance, and demands recognition for the feelings and (lost) struggles of people whom our own economic and political order condemn to exactly the humiliating circumstances Sierra presents to us as such. But he denies his audience the absolution promised by a critical art that, while it enlightens us by denouncing repressive conditions, is impotent to change them. In so doing, he also disrupts the self-deception of the art scene, which likes to believe that it occupies a place that is exempt from these conditions.

    To the extent that Sierra’s art is cruel, that is because abstractions are cruel at the moment they seize and control subjects or even negate them outright. And since art lacks all power to prevent practices of social cruelty, Sierra suggests, it can still associate its own aesthetic formalism with the sanctioned barbarism and offer onlookers an opportunity to distance themselves from it.

    (1) Richard Rorty, “Contingency, Irony, and Solidarity“, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1989, 3 ff.

    (2) Edward Grippe, “Richard Rorty (1931–2007)”, Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy (http://www.iep.utm.edu/rorty/).

    (3) Quoted in Gabriele Mackert and Gerald Matt, “Santiago Sierra”, exh. cat., Kunsthalle Wien project space, Vienna, 2002

    (4) Richard Rorty, “Consequences of Pragmatism”, University of Minnesota Press, Minneapolis, 1982.

    (5) Claire Bishop has accordingly discussed Sierra (as well as Thomas Hirschhorn) as a key figure of a concept of relational aesthetics turned political and indeed democratic in the proper sense of the word. Clearly distinguishing his work from Nicolas Bourriaud’s warm and fuzzy notion of social interaction, Bishop, drawing on the work of Mouffe and Laclau, emphasizes that the principle of a democratic social order consists not in consensus and harmony, but in the understanding that many of our views are incompatible and that this incompatibility is in fact legitimate. Sierra, Bishop argues, renders relational antagonisms visible that the semblance of social harmony suppresses, and so creates a concrete basis on which to rethink our relation to the world and to ourselves. See Claire Bishop, “Antagonism and Relational Aesthetics,” October 110 (Fall 2004), 51–79.

    Abstraktion aus Notwehr. Santiago Sierras solidarische Grausamkeit
    Text by Alexander Koch

    Lange war Abstraktion in der Kunst vor allem eine Geschichte des ästhetischen Essentialismus: des Glaubens, eine bestimmte Systematik der Formen müsse in der Lage sein, das Wesen der Dinge und ihrer Erscheinungen so grundsätzlich zu erfassen und bildnerisch anzuordnen, dass sich etwas Allgemeines, etwas Wahres, etwas Letztes darüber würde sagen lassen. Etwas, das sich aus dem Hier und Jetzt einer konkreten Lebenswelt erhebt.

    Diesen Glauben hatte Richard Rorty mit Blick auf die Verwendung sprachlicher Zeichen als die Suche des (v. a. westlichen) Denkens nach „abschließenden Vokabularen“ bezeichnet.(1) Der amerikanische Pragmatist verstand darunter die Sehnsucht nach zeitlosen Formeln der Erkenntnis, die Hoffnung auf letzte Gewissheit. Santiago Sierra und Richard Rorty ist gemeinsam, dass sie diese Hoffnung aufgaben, dieses Bedürfnis, die Welt als einen unveränderlich überschaubaren Ort begreifen zu müssen. Beide haben sich für eine andere, in ihren Augen fundamentalere Hoffnung entschieden, dass nämlich die Welt ein gerechterer Ort werden könnte als sie es derzeit ist – und dass es diejenigen Verhältnisse zu ändern gälte, die Ungerechtigkeit hervorbringen. Dass die Philosophie dazu wenig beitragen würde, war für Rorty ausgemacht. Sierra traut seinerseits der Kunst nicht mehr zu. Trotzdem haben beide innerhalb ihrer jeweiligen Disziplin die Frage danach, was wir erkennen können und wie sich die Zeichen dieser Erkenntnis organisieren lassen, radikal politisiert und das Interesse an Wahrheit eingetauscht gegen ein Interesse an Selbstbestimmung und Solidarität.

    Kenner des Werkes von Santiago Sierra mag überraschen, eine solidarische Passion damit verknüpft zu sehen, gilt es doch manchen eher als krawallig. Ich glaube, gerade der Begriff der Abstraktion kann erhellen, welches Ziel Sierras Kunst verfolgt, und Richard Rortys philosophischer und politischer Anti-Essentialismus scheint mir dabei geeignet, die äußerst klare und scharfe ethische Position Sierras zu kennzeichnen und letztlich das Solidaritätsprinzip seines Werkes zu beschreiben. Das wird das Interesse dieses Textes sein.

    ***

    Für den Fortgang ästhetischer Abstraktion markierte die Minimal Art eine Wende. In Abgrenzung zur starken Betonung subjektiver Gefühlswelten im Abstrakten Expressionismus fanden die Minimalisten in standardisierten Formen und Materialien aus der industriellen Massenproduktion ein rationales Vokabular, hinter dem die gestalterische Subjektivität der Autoren verschwinden konnte. Ein Vorgang, für den Sierra eine Art Hass-Liebe zu empfinden scheint. Denn einerseits erschloss sich der Kunst dabei ein formaler Direktzugang zu den anonymen Prinzipien einer standardisierten Arbeits- und Warenwelt, denen Sierras Interesse gilt. Andererseits lehnte der Minimalismus jegliche Verantwortung für die inhaltliche und zumal politische Bedeutung seiner Anordnungen ab, blendete ihren gesellschaftlichen Kontext kategorisch aus und kam zu einem essentialistischen Werkbegriff, der etwa in einem Kubus allein dessen formale, ja, mathematische Logik erkennen wollte, einen geometrischen Raumkörper, der nichts ist als nur er selbst.

    Genau diese Haltung des Rekurses auf die intrinsischen Eigenschaften einer Sache hatte Rorty abgelehnt als die Zwangsvorstellung, mit den geeigneten Vernunftmitteln würde sich darüber etwas Absolutes sagen lassen, etwas, das mehr wäre als nur eine historische und kontingente Beschreibung durch ein Subjekt. Ein solches Raunen der Ewigkeit durchzieht den Minimalismus ebenso wie Teile der Analytischen Philosophie, deren formale Logik Rorty zunehmend als weltfremd empfand. Er schlug daher vor, wir sollten unsere Vernunft nicht auf die Suche nach ewigen Aussagen schicken, sondern sie auf die Frage verwenden, wie wir menschliche Grausamkeit begrenzen könnten und wie sich schließlich „das aufklärerische Projekt der Entmystifizierung des menschlichen Lebens“ vervollständigen ließe, „die Menschheit aus den Fesseln ‚ontotheologischer‘ Metaphern vergangener Traditionen zu befreien und so die Machtbeziehungen von Kontrolle und Unterwerfung, die diesen Metaphern innewohnen, zu ersetzen durch die Beschreibung von Beziehungen, die auf Toleranz und Freiheit aufbauen.“(2)

    Vergleichbar sieht Sierra in der selbstbezüglichen Ästhetik der Minimal Art „eine ungeheure Anmaßung und Selbstzufriedenheit der westlichen Kultur“ und setzt sich von ihr ab, indem er die Grausamkeiten hervorhebt, die sich hinter ihrer Rationalität verbergen. Im formalen Vokabular des Minimalismus, dessen objektivistische Rhetorik Individualität nivellierte, findet er das geeignete Instrumentarium, um die entmenschlichten Abstraktionen des Kapitalismus dingfest zu machen. Dabei erweitert er zugleich substanziell den über dieses Vokabular erreichbaren Gegenstandsbereich: Seine Skulpturen und Aktionen rekurrieren nicht nur auf formale und materielle Prinzipien der Industrieproduktion, sondern von Beginn an auch auf die logistischen Abläufe des Güterverkehrs, auf die repressive Organisation abhängiger Beschäftigungsverhältnisse, auf soziale Normierung und Ausgrenzung mittels legislativer, judikativer und exekutiver Gewalt und vor allem auf die Integration amoralischer Interessen durch deren wirtschaftliche, politische und technologische Standardisierung und Legitimation.

    Sierra nutzt die formalen Abstraktionsleistungen seiner am Minimalismus geschulten Praxis nicht, um sich über die historische Kontingenz und die Gefühle zerspaltener und unterworfener Subjekte zu erheben, sondern um deren strukturelle Unterdrückung unmissverständlich zu machen. „Nicht leere Gefäße zu entdecken ist das Interessante, sondern sie zu verwenden (...), und damit befinde ich mich in derselben Situation wie viele andere, die den Minimalismus als ein Arsenal von Instrumenten sehen, deren sie sich bedienen können, aber seine inhaltliche Leere nicht ertragen.“(3) Anstatt minimalistische Ideologien abzuwandeln oder zu kritisieren, reproduziert Sierra sie, mit dem einzigen Unterschied, dass er ihre „Leere“ mit sozialer Realität füllt: mit Materialien, die klar innerhalb einer gesellschaftlichen Problematik zu verorten sind, oder mit den Körpern und Leben von Menschen, deren physische und mentale Stigmatisierung, Segregation, Unfreiheit und Ausbeutung nicht ihm, sondern einer systemischen Logik anzulasten ist, die er ebenso unbeteiligt wiedergibt wie es zuvor die Minimalisten taten. Nur mit dem Unterschied, dass er anders als diese seinen formalen Bezugsrahmen vor allem auf politische und ökonomische Systeme ausrichtet, deren Grausamkeit – und manchmal auch den Widerstand dagegen – sein Werk appropriiert.

    ***

    Einige Beispiele aus dem Werk Santiago Sierras:

    PRISM. Workshop, Hamburg, Deutschland, 1990:
    Am Beginn seines Frühwerkes klärte Sierra einige grundlegende Differenzen mit der minimalistischen Doktrin. Mit PRISM, ebenso wie mit CUBIC CONTAINER aus dem gleichen Jahr, baute er Kuben, die sich typologisch auf Donald Judd zurückführen lassen. Während es ein Sakrileg wäre, eines von Judds „Spezifischen Objekten“ einmal liegend und einmal stehend zu präsentieren, zeigen Sierras Fotografien von PRISM gezielt diese beiden unterschiedlichen Zustände ein und desselben Objekts und schließen damit reine Selbstbezüglichkeit kategorisch aus. Die Entpersönlichung seiner Werke trieb Judd so weit, dass er Fingerabdrücke darauf als ihre Zerstörung empfand. Sierra hingegen stellt seinen Raumkörper aus einer gebrauchten LKW-Plane her, in deren schmutziger Oberfläche sich die zurückgelegten Wegstrecken und Arbeitsprozesse im Warentransfer dokumentierten, Fingerabdrücke inklusive.

    WALKS. Hamburg, Deutschland, 1990:
    Sierras erste fotografische Serie hält in 36 Bildern 18 Situationen fest, die der damalige Student an der Hamburger Akademie bei Spaziergängen im Stadtraum vorfand: Stapel von Paletten, Steinplatten und anderen Baumaterialien, deren Anordnung die strukturelle Systematik von Carl Andre, Sol LeWitt, Donald Judd und weiteren Vertretern der Minimal Art wachruft. Dem rationalen Gleichmaß von deren Werken folgen Sierras Fundstücke freilich nicht. Sie zeigen gerade umgekehrt, wie sehr der minimalistische Formalismus seine Bezüge zur industriellen Produktion idealisierte und stilisierte – und folglich weder in der Lage war noch ein Interesse daran hatte, in der geometrischen Standardisierung industrieller Maße eine vor allem ökonomische Rationalität effizienter Fertigungs-, Transport- und Konstruktionsprozesse zu erkennen, in welche sich die ausführenden Arbeiter einzufügen hatten. Jedes der von Sierra vorgefundenen Motive dokumentiert eine Abweichung von dieser Rationalität als Interferenz von Produktivitätsanforderungen einerseits und einer subtil widerständigen Subjektivität andererseits, die sich nur so weit ins formale Diktat fügt wie eben nötig. Wie schon PRISM bietet auch WALKS programmatisch je zwei verschiedene Perspektiven auf ein und denselben Gegenstand und widerspricht so auf der Wahrnehmungs- ebenso wie auf der Darstellungsebene dem minimalistischen Essentialismus, der sich von der individuellen Blickrichtung auf das Gegebene unabhängig wähnte.

    250 CM LINE TATTOOED ON 6 PAID PEOPLE. Espacio Aglutinador, Havanna, Kuba, Dezember 1999; HIRING AND ARRANGEMENT OF 30 WORKERS IN RELATION TO THEIR SKIN COLOR. Project Space, Kunsthalle Wien, Österreich, September 2002:
    Santiago Sierra zahlte sechs arbeitslosen jungen Männern je 30 Dollar, damit sie sich eine Linie auf den Rücken tätowieren ließen. Um eine Gesamtlänge von 250 cm zu erreichen, stellte Sierra sechs Rücken zusammen und ließ eine horizontale Tätowierung über sie legen. Den Körper eines Menschen für 30 Dollar zu kaufen für die Ausführung eines Kunstwerkes, das ihn vermutlich nur bedingt interessiert, dessen Spur er aber sein Leben lang nicht mehr loswerden wird, erscheint pervers. Ebenso wie eine zweite Arbeit aus dem Jahr 2002, HIRING AND ARRANGEMENT OF 30 WORKERS IN RELATION TO THEIR SKIN COLOR. Sierra ließ von der Wiener Kunsthalle 30 Arbeiterinnen und Arbeiter mit helleren und dunkleren Hautfarben anheuern, sortierte sie gemäß der Tönung ihrer Haut und platzierte sie in Unterwäsche mit dem Gesicht zur Wand. Den beiden Werken von 1999 und 2002 ist gemeinsam, dass sie menschliche Körper jeweils abstrakten formalen Prinzipien unterwerfen, die ihre Individualität zum Preis einer unangemessen scheinenden Entlohnung negieren – Prinzipien, die sich in minimalistischen und konzeptuellen Kunstpraxen ebenso finden wie in alltäglichen Praxen sozialer Normierung, Segregation und Stigmatisierung. Erstere macht sich Sierra zu eigen, um Letztere komprimiert zu reproduzieren. Seine Vorgehensweise ist so gesehen überaus gewöhnlich und geradezu nicht mehr als eine Anwendung vorgefundener sozialer und ästhetischer Muster, deren Kombination jedoch schwer erträglich ist.

    Wenn Richard Rorty hoffte, die Menschen „von den Fesseln ‚ontotheologischer‘ Metaphern vergangener Traditionen zu befreien und so die Machtbeziehungen von Kontrolle und Unterwerfung, die diesen Metaphern innewohnen“, zu überwinden, so zeigen sich die beiden Arbeiten Sierras als geeigneter Beitrag, dieses aufklärerische Projekt voranzubringen. Denn sein Umgang mit dem ästhetischen Vokabular von Linie und Farbskala macht eine „ontotheologische“ Rezeption unerträglich. Eine angenommene Gerade von 250 cm Länge, so zeigt er, ist in ihrer normativen Begrenzung nicht lediglich eine mathematische Größe oder eine künstlerische „Idee“, sondern hat in einer von Menschen bewohnten Welt Bedingungen und Konsequenzen, die schmerzhaft sein können und es auch sind. Gleichermaßen ist die Aufteilung des Wahrnehmungsraums in Skalen der Farbabstufung weit mehr als eine rein formale Systematik, wenn solche Skalen eine Entsprechung in sozialen Hierarchien finden, die Menschen nach rassischen und nationalen Herkunftskriterien sortieren.

    WORKERS WHO CANNOT BE PAID, REMUNERATED TO REMAIN INSIDE CARDBOARD BOXES. Kunst Werke, Berlin, Deutschland, September 2000:
    Sechs aus Pappkarton improvisierte, hochformatige Kuben in Reihe gestellt. Darin auf einem Stuhl sitzend, von außen nicht sichtbar, sechs im Werktitel als Arbeiter klassifizierte Menschen, die nicht bezahlt werden können und doch dafür entlohnt werden, dass sie sechs Wochen lang täglich sechs Stunden im Inneren der Gehäuse still verbleiben. Bezahlt werden konnten die tschetschenischen Einwanderer deshalb nicht, weil ihnen die deutsche Gesetzgebung verbot, als Asylbewerber Lohn entgegenzunehmen, den sie also informell für ihre gegebene Zeit erhielten. Zu beachten ist, dass Sierra die Personen im Werktitel nicht als Asylbewerber bezeichnet, sondern als Arbeiter. Sierra stellt also keineswegs ihren Wunsch oder ihre Fähigkeit zu arbeiten infrage, sondern es ist ihr juristischer Status, der sie daran hindert und den Sierra hintergeht, indem er die im Rahmen seiner Aktion erbrachte Leistung unsichtbar entlohnt. Hier wie ihn ähnlichen Aktionen unterstellte die Presse gerne, Sierra würde die Notlage der Menschen ausnutzen, die er ausstellte, und dies sei grausam.

    Beurteilt man das Geschehen aber sachlich, muss man festhalten, dass Sierra einen objektiven Zustand wiedergibt. Die engagierten Personen befinden sich – in ihrem Leben wie in Sierras Werk – in einer normierten Situation, die ihre Körper und ihren Handlungsspielraum eng umschließt und in der ihnen nichts weiter bleibt als auszuharren. Die Isolation, in der sie sitzen, entspricht ihrem sozialen Status. Dazu gehört auch, dass das Kunstpublikum sich in aller Regel nicht ernsthaft für sie interessiert – und wenn, dann wiederum nur „abstrakt“, als sozialkritisches Thema. Vermutlich waren nur wenige von denen, die die Aktion sahen, zuvor einem Asylbewerber physisch und ggf. emotional so nahe gekommen wie in dem Moment, als sie oder er in der Ausstellung an einem der Kartons lauschte, ob auch wirklich jemand darin saß, und sich dann vielleicht ergriffen oder auch empört darüber zeigte, dass es so war. Wenn Sierra die sechs Arbeiter in einer Reihung von sechs Kuben für sein Publikum unsichtbar macht und im Raum abkapselt, ist seine Anordnung exakt realistisch.

    PERSON SAYING A PHRASE. New Street, Birmingham, Großbritannien, Februar 2002:
    Die Menschen, die an Santiago Sierras Aktionen teilnehmen, sind niemals Statisten, sondern gehören ausnahmslos der Personengruppe an, die das jeweilige Werk thematisiert: Arbeiter, Arbeitslose, Prostituierte, Kriegsveteranen, Roma, Huicholes, Weiße und Schwarze, Frauen und Männer. Zahlreiche Werke erwähnen im Titel oder Untertitel eine Bezahlung der Teilnehmer, oft wird auch die Höhe genannt. (Sierras Website www.santiago-sierra.com ist übrigens ein vollständiges Werkverzeichnis und ein zentrales Dokumentationsmedium seiner künstlerischen Praxis. Hier sind alle nötigen Informationen zu den einzelnen Projekten öffentlich zugänglich.) Sierras Bezahlung ist meist so gering wie die Personen bereit sind zu akzeptieren. Warum, macht wohl keine Arbeit so deutlich wie PERSON SAYING A PHRASE. Sierra lässt auf einer Birminghamer Straße einen Mann, der vermutlich obdachlos, jedenfalls arm ist, einen Satz nachsprechen, den der Künstler ihm vor laufender Kamera selbst diktiert: „My participation in this piece could generate seventy two thousand dollars profit, I am paid five pounds.“ Sierra spricht das Ausbeutungsverhältnis im Inneren seines Werkes selbst aus bzw. lässt es aussprechen.

    Die Differenz zwischen den beiden Summen ist eklatant, die Nötigung des Mannes, diese Wahrheit zu sagen, ist es auch. Am Ende der einminütigen Videoaufzeichnung scheint er entsprechend konsterniert, zuvor offenbar nicht wissend, welchen Satz er gegen fünf Pfund zu sagen haben würde. Sierras Aktion gleicht in ihrer Form den Kurzbefragungen und Überrumpelungen von Menschen auf der Straße, die ein fester Bestandteil zahlreicher Fernsehformate sind. Und sie ist ein performativer Akt der Ausbeutung, der nur möglich ist aufgrund einer kapitalistischen Wertschöpfungskette, in welcher sich der erzielte Endpreis eines Produktes – hier eines Kunstwerkes von Sierra – von der realen Investition in dieses Produkt vollständig entkoppeln lässt und eine gerechte Aufteilung des Erlöses zwischen den an der Produktion beteiligten Akteuren nicht vorgesehen ist. Sierra zeigt sich hier selbst in der Rolle des Ausbeutenden und kommentiert: "Was in der Welt der Kunst erlaubt ist, deckt sich natürlich mit dem, was in der Welt des Kapitalismus erlaubt ist. Wir teilen uns ein und dieselbe Wirklichkeit." Da Sierra jedoch den gleichen Satz ausspricht wie sein Gegenüber, lässt die Spiegelung der beiden Aussagen mindestens symbolisch offen, ob nicht auch Sierra für seine Teilnahme an der Arbeit nur fünf Pfund erhält, oder zumindest seinerseits in einem Ausbeutungsverhältnis steht.

    ***

    Wenn weite Teile des Werkes Santiago Sierras von zweifelhafter Moralität sind, so hat die Kritik daran diesen Umstand in der Vergangenheit meist unzureichend durchdacht und hat insbesondere die für dieses Werk so entscheidende Bezugnahme auf Verfahren des Minimalismus verkürzt dargestellt. Sofern sich diese Kritik ablehnend äußerte, reichte sie vom Konstatieren einer nihilistischen Haltung, die nichts anderes weiß als die sozialen Grausamkeiten zu wiederholen, an denen sie selbst nichts ändern kann, bis zum Vorwurf des blanken Zynismus aufseiten des Künstlers, aus dieser Grausamkeit zum Schaden anderer Profit zu schlagen. Es gilt aber, zunächst vier Dinge zu verstehen:

    1. Die Zahlung niedriger Löhne zum Ziele der Profitmaximierung, die soziale Deklassierung, Verdrängung und Ausgrenzung bestimmter Bevölkerungsteile und dergleichen mehr sind weitläufig standardisierte Alltagspraxen. Sierras Vorgehen unterscheidet sich von den gesellschaftlichen Prozessen, die es strukturell appropriiert, allein dadurch, dass es sie komprimiert wiedergibt, und dies als Kunst.

    2. Wenn es als ein „Skandal“ angesehen wird, gewisse Realitäten ohne doppelten Boden und ohne jede moralische Kommentierung der Öffentlichkeit „als Kunst“ vorzusetzen, kann das nur bedeuten, dass deren Wiedergabe im Reich der Ästhetik und innerhalb kultureller Institutionen als illegitim angesehen wird, während sie ansonsten als Norm nicht nur hingenommen, sondern ja allgemein anerkannt und als gesellschaftlicher Standard praktiziert werden. Nur dass man solche Standards in der Regel nicht unmittelbar sieht, und zwar gerade deshalb, weil sie für viele weitgehend nur als abstrakte Anordnungen des Sozialen wahrnehmbar sind, nicht als greifbare Lebenswirklichkeit. Im Falle des Geldes handelt es sich zudem um eine Abstraktion per se.

    3. Santiago Sierras Praxis ist allem voran eine dokumentarische. Er registriert reale Vorgänge und hält sie in geeigneten Darstellungs- und Speichermedien fest. Er ist Kellner, nicht Koch. Dass etwa Menschen bereit sind, sich gegen geringe Bezahlung in erniedrigende Situationen zu begeben, belegt nicht Sierras Skrupellosigkeit, sondern die Bereitschaft dieser Menschen, sich für Geld erniedrigen zu lassen und dies nicht erst im Auftrag Sierras tun, sondern oftmals tagtäglich, was gewiss auf die gesellschaftlichen Umstände zurückzuführen ist, in denen sie leben, und nicht auf ihren Masochismus.

    4. Dass die Mitspieler in Sierras Projekten diese selbst als unfair, ausbeuterisch oder belastend empfinden, ist eine Unterstellung, die zumindest überprüft werden müsste. In der Zusammenarbeit mit Kriegsveteranen, die sich im Auftrag Sierras für mehrere Stunden und Tage schamhaft in die Ecke eines Kunstraumes stellten, erlebte ich es genau umgekehrt. Zitat: „Ich bin Sierra dankbar für diese Möglichkeit. Denn das ist ja mein Leben. Normalerweise interessiert sich nur niemand dafür. Das hier gibt mir die Gelegenheit, einmal aus dieser Unsichtbarkeit herauszutreten.“ Und ein anderer sagte: „Das ist doch eine Wahrheit. Wir schämen uns doch. Ich finde es völlig richtig, dazu auch zu stehen, auch wenn das schwierig ist.“ Mit diesen Aussagen will ich nicht behaupten, es gäbe immer eine Identifikation der Akteure mit den ausgeführten Handlungen, und selbst dann wäre fraglich, wie weit sie mit dem Kontext vertraut sind, in dem sie diese vollziehen. Man unterschätzt aber ggf. das Bewusstsein der Akteure für ihre eigene Situation und auch ihre Solidarität mit Sierras Versuch, sie zu artikulieren.

    ***

    Richard Rorty geriet mit Habermas in eine lange währende Auseinandersetzung darüber, ob sich die Universalität der Menschenrechte auf eine letztlich essentialistische Weise würden rechtfertigen lassen, was Rorty in Habermas’ Rekurs auf eine „ideale Kommunikationssituation“ gegeben sah, die er für illusorisch hielt. Rorty hingegen bezog eine für viele schwer akzeptierbare Position, die später auch von Chantal Mouffe gestützt wurde: Die Menschenrechte lassen sich durch nichts rechtfertigen, sie sind nicht mehr und nicht weniger als eine Weise, wie Menschen ihren Umgang miteinander gemeinsam abstimmen, dabei die Auffassung teilend, dass Grausamkeiten jeder Art das Schlimmste sind, was Menschen Menschen antun können, und sich also dazu verabreden, sie zu vermeiden. Die ganze übrige politische und kulturelle Debatte über die Menschenrechte kann dann nur noch darum geführt werden, was wir für grausam halten und was nicht, wer „wir“ sind und wie sich dieses Wir auf Personenkreise ausweiten lässt, die die Sache heute anders sehen.

    Rorty delegierte damit die moralische Übereinkunft zwischen Menschen, ihrem Zusammenleben eine bestimmte Form zu geben, radikal an diese Menschen selbst und weigerte sich, dafür Hilfestellung von einer erhabeneren Instanz zu verlangen, zum Beispiel der Vernunft. Den Glauben daran, Menschen trügen etwas tief in sich, das sie von Natur aus zum guten und gerechten Handeln befähige, wies Rorty mit der – programmatisch anti-essentialistischen – Bemerkung zurück: „There is nothing deep inside us except what we have put there ourselves.“(4) Nicht in transzendentalen Rechten, sondern in der Literatur – und ich weite hier sein Argument auf alle Künste aus – sah er infolge das beste Instrument, um Menschen die Kämpfe und Leiden anderer nahezubringen und ihnen Grausamkeit so unerträglich zu machen, dass deren Vermeidung ihnen fortan wirklich etwas bedeuten könnte. Sich während der Rezeption eines Werkes in Perspektiven einzudenken, die gar nicht die eigenen sind, sich mit fremden Schicksalen zu solidarisieren, Empathie zu empfinden für Leute, die man vielleicht gar nicht versteht, erschien Rorty weitaus bedeutender für das humanistische Projekt als philosophische Begründungsversuche einer universalen Ethik.

    Diese Position deckt sich in meinen Augen vollständig mit der ethischen Haltung, die Santiago Sierras Werk einnimmt, und mit der Weise, wie diese Haltung ihre Form findet. Sierra verweigert es, irgendeine moralische Haltung zu den Ereignissen vorzugeben oder auch nur zu suggerieren, die er künstlerisch aufruft. Dabei macht er sich einen Kerngedanken des Minimalismus zu eigen, wonach die Bedeutung eines Werkes nicht in diesem selbst zu finden sei, sondern durch die Eigenleistung von Betrachtern in dieses hineingelegt werde. Sierra politisiert diese aktive Betrachterposition indes drastisch: Indem er seine eigene Praxis moralisch entleert, delegiert er die Einschätzung von deren Moralität an die Rezipienten. Das Publikum seiner Aktionen, Skulpturen, Filme und Fotografien sieht sich mit Grausamkeiten konfrontiert, die es in der Regel nicht selbst erleiden muss, zumindest nicht gerade jetzt, und deren ethische Rechtfertigung es oftmals als hoch fragwürdig empfinden muss. Es gerät dabei fast zwangsläufig mit dem Werk in Konflikt, empfindet es vielleicht als feindselig und neigt dazu, spontan und leidenschaftlich Position für ihm sonst eher fernstehende Individuen zu beziehen oder bestimmte soziale und ökonomische Vorgänge abzulehnen, die ihm üblicherweise weniger aufstoßen. Was zunächst wie eine künstlerische Provokation erscheinen kann, zielt letztlich frontal auf die Konstruktion einer emanzipierten Betrachterposition und die Verhandlung dessen, was wir für moralisch vertretbar halten und was nicht.(5)

    Sierras künstlerische Gesellschaftskritik vollzieht sich somit nicht als Darbietung einer kritischen und auch nicht einer zynischen Haltung des Künstlers oder seiner Kunst, sondern als Nötigung des Kunstpublikums, die Ausbeutung, Unterdrückung und Beschämung von Menschen, die Sierra in Museen, Galerien und auf Biennalen real initiiert, als einen Konflikt zu empfinden, der den Schein sozialer Harmonie zerbricht und jene Verhandlung unterschiedlicher ethischer Maßstäbe fordert, die heute immer weniger möglich scheint und doch den Kern des Politischen ausmacht. Dafür wählt Sierra gerade nicht den klassischen, üblichen Weg der Abstraktion als einen Weg vom Konkreten zum Allgemeinen, von einem gegebenen Menschen oder Material zu einer diesem übergeordneten Formel. Er nimmt statt dessen den umgekehrten Weg von real existierenden Abstraktionen inmitten der gesellschaftlichen Normalität und schließt sie kurz mit einem konkreten Körper und seinen Emotionen, mit einem realen Leben und seiner Zeit, mit einer spezifischen Herkunft und ihren Folgen.

    Sierra betrachtet soziale Gewalt nicht als Abkehr von dem, was gesellschaftlich opportun ist, sondern als Ausdruck der von uns mitgetragenen normativen Herrschafts- und Wirtschaftsformen: Kapitalismus und Liberalismus. Er solidarisiert sich mit denen, die heute wahlweise als Effizienz- oder als Störfaktoren berechnet werden, und fordert die Anerkennung der Gefühle und der (verlorenen) Kämpfe der Menschen, die unsere eigenen wirtschaftlichen und politischen Ordnungen in eben jene beschämende Lage bringen, die Sierra uns als solche präsentiert. Jedoch verweigert er seinem Publikum die Absolution durch eine kritische Kunst, die repressive Verhältnisse aufklärerisch denunzieren, aber nicht ändern kann. Er unterbricht damit auch den Selbstbetrug der Kunstszene, die gerne glaubt, über einen Ort zu verfügen, der über diese Verhältnisse erhaben sei.

    Sofern Sierras Kunst grausam ist, ist sie es, weil Abstraktionen grausam sind, sobald sie Subjekte erfassen und kontrollieren oder gleich negieren. Und da der Kunst jede Macht fehlt, Praxen sozialer Grausamkeit zu unterbinden, bleibt ihr nach Sierra doch, ihren eigenen ästhetischen Formalismus mit der sanktionierten Barbarei gemeinzumachen und Dritten eine Chance zu geben, sich davon zu distanzieren.

    (1) Vergl. Richard Rorty, „Contingency, Irony, and Solidarity“, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge 1989, S. 3 ff.

    (2) Edward Grippe, „Richard Rorty (1931–2007)“, Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy (http://www.iep.utm.edu/rorty/).

    (3) Zitiert nach Gabriele Mackert und Gerald Matt, „Santiago Sierra“. Kunsthalle Wien project space, Wien: Kunsthalle Wien, 2002.

    (4) Richard Rorty, “Consequences of Pragmatism”, University of Minnesota Press, Minneapolis 1982.

    (5) Claire Bishop hat Sierra (wie auch Thomas Hirschhorn) daher als Schlüsselfigur eines politisch, ja, im eigentlichen Sinne demokratisch gewendeten Begriffs relationaler Ästhetik diskutiert. In unmissverständlicher Abgrenzung von Nicolas Bourriauds weichgespülter Vorstellung von sozialer Interaktion stellte Bishop mit Blick auf Mouffe und Laclau klar, dass nicht Konsens und Harmonie die Prinzipien einer demokratischen Gesellschaftsordnung bilden, sondern die Auffassung, dass viele unserer Ansichten unvereinbar sind und diese Unvereinbarkeit gleichwohl legitim ist. Sierra, so Bishop, mache relationale Antagonismen sichtbar, die der Schein sozialer Harmonie unterdrücke, und schaffe damit eine konkrete Ausgangsbasis dafür, unser Verhältnis zur Welt und zu uns selbst neu zu überdenken. Vgl. Claire Bishop, „Antagonism and Relational Aesthetics“, October 110 (Herbst 2004), S. 51–79.

  • Catfish Instead of Buddha. Michael E. Smith’s Materialism of Basic Needs
  • Option Lots. Eine Recherche von Brandlhuber+
  • dirt that catches the sun. CHRIS MARTIN’S SOcIAL HORIZON Of A sPIRITUAL ABSTRACTION
  • The Coming Takeover For a decoupling of the power to define cultural policy and cultural administration
  • Zehn Schöne Inseln. Die Binnengrenzen des Kunstfeldes. Ein Beschreibungsmodell
  • opting Out of ART. A THEORETICAL FOUNDATION
Close