Uncheck the box to avoid the aggregation and analysis of your behaviour data collected on this website. Done
Looking for something specific?
Just start typing anywhere to search anything.

Yours, KOW
DeutschEnglish

Text by Alexander Koch

From 1963 till 1969, Franz Erhard Walther designed the 58 objects of his »1. Workset«, which would become a classic in German postwar art. It fit in the »Bonner Republik«. Hardly 20 years after fascism had ended, there was a longing for new, progressive and unostentatious symbols of understanding and public spirit. Symbols which the »1. Workset« offered. Simultaneously, he found recognition among the international avant-gardes. Already in 1969, his work was exhibited in the Museum of Modern Art and in Szeemann’s Documenta in 1972. Walther’s 1. Workset became one of the artistic emblems for a new democratic German self image, a country open to the world.

In this respect, Walther’s role bore resemblance to Beuys’s. Beuys, however, belonged to another generation. Based on old, heroic artist images and a profoundly allegoric notion of the oeuvre, the shaman from Düsseldorf positioned himself in the center of his cosmos, fraught with meaning, and called to join him in his visions. Beuys temporarily transformed the Düsseldorf Art Academy into a place of national interest where hundreds of followers would gather. Walther attended the academy from 1962 till 1964, yet oriented himself towards artists like Lucio Fontana, Yves Klein und Piero Manzoni, modern altar robbers of old work liturgies and artist myths. Quite contrary to Beuys, Walther wanted his objects to be meaningless. In themselves, they should not offer anything more than the possibility of an action. Only through the act, the meaning would arise. »Their meaning is their use« is what Wittgenstein wrote about words. That is, language is empty without its practical framework and aims of usage. Words in themselves have no meaning. Walther said the same about artworks and took up, regarding their epistemological status, a decisive anti-essentialist and pragmatic position.

The objects of the »1. Workset« were not made to be looked at, searching for a deeper meaning which could be found if only we would gaze at them long enough. When the artworks were wrapped up – the state they were mostly in at exhibitions – they gave little ‘meaningful’ away. If there was anything they could contribute to cognition, then it would be merely a result of an experience which they evoked, but not determined. Their epistemic value remained undefined. They were made to be used by an audience. Only then did they ‘make sense’. ‘Using’ them meant, taking one of the 58 Work Pieces – which were conceived by Franz Erhard Walther and manufactured with the help of Johanna Walther – out of their storage packing and carrying them out by the instructions of the artist, i.e. to follow the possible ways of employment that the object suggested and that Walther had sometimes demonstrated. ‘Using’ meant, physically acquiring one of Walther’s objects. Rolling it out, readjusting it, covering up, often together with others. By doing so, one would gradually grasp its practical and symbolic functions and experience them in person. In Walther’s own words: to bring about a »Werksituation« (W), or a Werkprozess« (W), in which a »Werkgedanke« (W) takes place through the act of a »Werkhandlung« (W).

***

Situation, Process, Concept, Action. Those are the key notions of the progressive and societal-oriented art movements of the sixties. A time when many sought to break free from static and conventional art notions, which seemed too far from reality. Deference for a work of art and its creator was a byword for bourgeois conventions (those that made Walther flee his catholic hometown Fulda as soon as he could), for rooted social stereotypes, for institutionalized orders of things and human beings, for the logic of fordistic production and work relations. All which the conventional art notions set forth. In today’s post-fordistic knowledge-based service economy with its mental and digital products and virtual values, we have at least, theoretically, less problems not equating artworks with visual objects, but acknowledging artworks as ideas, immaterial goods, processes, and even the audiences’ integration and participation. In the mid-sixties, such an art notion met with strong opposition both in the public and academic world, since it did not only tamper with academic categories and the authorities that represented these categories , but also with existing possessory relations. (And also among the current ‘avant-gardists’ and notably within the mainstream, it is still a challenge to acknowledge the immateriality, the societal character of a work respectively – there are neither clear economic rules nor habitual institutional ways to go about it. If there were, how would Tino Sehgals oral sales have caused so much fuss? And what would be so specific about the ‘communicability’ of Rikrit Tiravanijas or Liam Gillicks work?)

Franz Erhard Walther began to rewrite old notions of the artwork from the mid-sixties onwards. He gave them new performative connotations and created new scenarios for its utilization, both in artistic practice as in terminology (Walther conceived the form and content for numerous publications). Walther did not abandon the notion of the work of art; he gave it new twists. He did not replace it by an actionistic vocabulary and avoided formulas of removing bounderies of art and life. But he dissociated the artwork from the object. He dematerialized it like the Conceptual Art would later do, yet without intellectualizing it. He used it pragmatically, placed it in an instrumental context. He drafted and described his works almost in a literal sense as a means, as »vehicles«, »instruments« and »tools« (W). Yet, he did not stress their processual character and distanced himself from the reception of his work demonstrations as being performances. Walther remained close to typography and sculpture – he was interested in the interspace. However, he interpreted this space as relations between people. Writing and sculptural-like sketches come together in his Work Drawings and unite space, activity and terminology.

Nowadays, Walther’s position is canonized and five out of eight editions of his »1. Workset« have found a place in museum collections. One easily tends to forget the original aim of his artistic and terminological work, namely to disconnect the art notion from its anchorage in a profoundly object-centred tradition and to establish a new understanding of ‘practice’, for which art is a societal event, not only in terms of its collective reception, but also in its production. Walther laid out the instruments and demonstrated how they functioned. But their actual usage that completed the work process every time anew, lied with their users and participants. Walther regarded them as co-authors. In a work diagram of 1966, he crossed out the term artist and put the producer of a work experience on par with the user of the worktools that he had set out. A gesture that reached out far into the future. Walther’s conception was to cross out the omnipotent position of the artist in the production of meaning and to regard an artwork
as the manifestation of an audience that takes up the offer to act.

***

Walther proposed to no longer think of art as being independent of its employment by a public. He saw the spectators as co-authors of the artworks that they would adopt in form and meaning both in private and in institutional contexts. The point of this proposal was not to consider societal projects or products as objectives in themselves, but as organisational forms of social usage. As tools to construct social communities that, at best, are based on the experience of participation and communicability. To this very day, when using such an instrumental art notion, one encounters stiff opposition. Against purpose and aim of art. As if, of all things, we would rob it from its freedom! Apart from the fact that Artistic Independence is a myth and that every aesthetical act follows implicit aims, it is crucial to see that instruments and tools are, in fact, mostly invented to serve certain, predictable purposes, but that they also engender new purposes, once they have been devised. Suddenly, things can be done that would have been hard to imagine beforehand. With regard to the constitution of a community, this sounds less like attaining an aim, but more like a revolution (Thomas S. Kuhn actually described this performative character of new tools in 1962, in the book »The Structure of Scientific Revolutions«).

But which forms of usage are the Work Pieces of the »1. Workset« suited for? For which not? What ways of utilization would come as a surprise? Let us consider the Eleven Meter Strap of 1964. That white, eleven meters long nylon textile with long straps at both ends is rolled up in its storage state. What to do with it, we can derive from one of Walther’s work demonstrations or from written instructions, from explanatory and reflective drawings or from documentations in the form of photography and film. Two persons can roll out the eleven meters of textile, bind the straps around their neck and span it between their bodies. The distance between the two is as variable as the nature of the strip allows. Perhaps they look at each other and talk about the situation. What is the appropriate location? A museum? An empty meadow? Berlin central station? Will they talk? About what? Will they move about? Will the users switch?

There are possible, plausible and canonized ways of using the Eleven Meter Strap. There are also silly, absurd, unanticipated employments. Pictures that remained unpublished or received little attention show Franz Erhard Walther and several co-authors in unorthodox situations that are discordant with the idealized and canonized representation of his work. These are not wrong. They are merely variations. When there is no work denotation that precedes the employment of an art object, then there is no wrong or right way of using it. There is an experience with the object at a specific location at a specific time, which is unprecedented and lies in the hands (and responsibility) of the performing actors.

***

Walther’s works remain inevitably incomplete. They call for our participation, not our deference. They are time-based. Not because their existence lies exclusively in their act of usage. That would be a misunderstanding. Their main stage is their storage form, in which they conserve their potential to be enacted at all times. They are models of symbolic participation which are activated, experienced and verified from case to case. They do not want to be valued or assessed on the basis of their intrinsic qualities, but on their function as mediators. They are not even aesthetical objects in the traditional sense of the word. A perception that seeks to submerge in them will be referred to the acting situation, to which is given opportunity, and to the dimension of experience they can offer. This dimension is then aesthetically, empathically and socially completely real; a dimension of acting, not of contemplating.

In ’62-’63, promptly before the »First Workset«, Walther had completed sculptural gestures – for instance, the laying out of right-angled paper objects on the floor or the marking of a geometrical shape using tightened threads in the room. Carl Andre, Donald Judd and Fred Sandback, leading figures of the American Minimalism had executed similar gestures at the same or a later point in time. However, unlike them, Walther had no interest in the depersonalization of the artwork, in its radical Selfness. He was not interested in the object lying on the floor, but in the act of spreading out, arranging and collecting, the fleetingness and the flexibility of the situation in the space; the work as a process. While long discussions were taking place in professional circles, to which extent the sculptures of American Minimalists were truly ‘with themselves’, alone in their objectivity, or whether they took up the role of their selfness for the eyes of the viewer – for which reason George Didi-Huberman identified them later as actors – Walther had always departed from a relational rapport between object and subject, where he gave preference to the experience of the subject and not to the identity of the art object.

This pulls his position very close to the recently well-received Charlotte Posenenske, who laid down her artistic practice in 1969 and abandoned the art field in order to continue working on participatorial working models in Sociology (which she considered being more adequate than the arts). Also Posenenskes sculptures from ’67–‘68, formally classified to Minimalism, were less developed for the observation, and much more for the adoption, usage, even rebuilding by its observer/user. Walther and Posenenske can represent a politicizable, societal-orientated alternative to American Minimal Art, that was criticized time and again for its essentialistic and apolitical character.

I propose to call Posenenske’s and Walther’s approach Participatorial Minimalism. On the one hand, in terms of an anti-essentialist Minimalism, that uses form and material to create social situations and that organizes them in space. Sculptural arrangements that mostly remain uncompleted, shift into the action radius of the observers, making them participants in the realization and/or possible alteration of these arrangements. This participation becomes constitutive for the work itself and therewith configures the reception of the sculpture as a shared, social activity. On the other hand, in terms of a strongly formalized offer for participation, both artists neither relate to an actual »Experience Dimension« of most participatory art, nor to a practical organisation of action groups, but rather gear towards a fundamentally relational art concept. Posenenske’s and Walther’s Participatory Minimalism – a coincidence that it arose 20 years after the end of war in Germany? – counts on the audience’s willingness to act and designs typified action models for individual and collective symbolic usage. The participation to a cultural practice is ultimately understood as a concrete experience of composing a democratic community.

Franz Erhard Walthers Partizipatorischer Minimalismus
Text by Alexander Koch

Zwischen 1963 bis 1969 entwarf Franz Erhard Walther die 58 Objekte seines 1. Werksatzes, der zu einem Klassiker der deutschen Nachkriegskunst wurde. Er passte in die »Bonner Republik«. Kaum 20 Jahre nach dem Ende des Faschismus war in Deutschland der Wunsch nach neuen, progressiven und zugleich unaufdringlichen Symbolen der Verständigung und des Gemeinsinns groß. Der 1. Werksatz bot sie. Zugleich fand er Anerkennung in den Augen internationaler Avantgarden, vor allem in den USA. Bereits 1969 zeigte ihn das Museum of Modern Art, 1972 Szeemanns Documenta 5. So konnte Walthers 1. Werksatz eine der künstlerischen Insignien für ein neues, ein demokratisches und weltoffenes deutsches Selbstbild werden.

Darin glich Walthers Rolle der von Beuys. Aber Beuys war eine andere Generation. Der Schamane aus Düsseldorf stellte sich – fußend auf alten, heroischen Künstlerbildern und einem zutiefst allegorischen Werkverständnis – selbst ins Zentrum seines bedeutungsschwangeren Kosmos, auf das man seinen Visionen folgen möge. Beuys machte die Düsseldorfer Kunstakademie, an der er hunderte von Gefolgsleuten versammelte, zeitweilig zum Ort nationalen Interesses. Walther studierte hier von 1962 bis 1964, orientierte sich jedoch an Künstlern wie Lucio Fontana, Yves Klein und Piero Manzoni, modernen Altarräubern alter Werkliturgien und Künstlermythen. Ganz im Gegensatz zu Beuys wollte Walther, dass seine Objekte bedeutungslos seinen. Allein für sich selbst genommen sollten sie nichts bieten, als die Möglichkeit einer Handlung, in der Bedeutung erst entsteht. »Ihre Bedeutung ist ihr Gebrauch. Das schrieb Wittgenstein über die Worte um zu sagen, dass die Sprache ohne den praktischen Rahmen und Zweck ihrer Verwendung leer ist. Nur für sich genommen bedeuten Worte nichts. Walther sagte gleiches über Kunstwerke und nahm damit hinsichtlich ihres epistemologischen Status eine entschieden antiessentialistische und pragmatische Position ein.

Die Objekte des 1. Werksatzes waren nicht gemacht, um angeschaut zu werden auf der Suche nach einem tieferen Sinn, der sich bei noch genauerem Hinsehen in ihnen finden lassen würde. Zumal wenn sie eingepackt waren wie meist, auch während sie ausgestellt wurden, ließ sich wenig »bedeutsames« an ihnen entdecken. Wenn sie etwas zur Erkenntnis der Menschen beizutragen hatten, dann erst als Folge einer Erfahrung, zu der sie wohl Anlass gaben, die sie aber keineswegs determinierten. Ihr Erkenntniswert blieb offen. Sie waren gemacht, um von einem Publikum benutzt zu werden. Erst dann machten sie Sinn. Sie »benutzen« hieß, die von Franz Erhard Walther konzipierten und unter Mithilfe von Johanna Walther gefertigten 58 Werkstücke (Walther) einzeln ihrem Lagerzustand zu entnehmen und sie gemäß den Vorgaben des Künstlers auszuführen bzw. den Nutzungsmöglichkeiten zu folgen, die in einem Objekt angelegt wurden und die Walther gelegentlich in Werkdemonstrationen (W) mit anderen vorführte. »Benutzen« hieß, sich eines von Walthers Objekten körperlich anzueignen – es zu entrollen, sich anzupassen, sich überzustülpen, meist gemeinsam mit anderen –, seine praktische und seine symbolische Funktion allmählich zu erfassen und am eignen Leib zu erfahren. In Walthers Worten: Eine Werksituation (W) oder einen Werkprozess (W) herzustellen, in der sich ein Werkgedanke (W) in dem Akt einer Werkhandlung (W) vollzieht.

***

Situation, Prozess, Gedanke, Handlung. Das sind Schlüsselbegriffe der progressiven und gesellschaftlich orientierten Kunstbewegungen der 1960er Jahre. Als man loskommen wollte von Kunstbegriffen, die statisch und ohne Bezug zur Wirklichkeit klangen. Ehrfurcht vor einem Werk und seinem Schöpfer stand hier synonym für bürgerliche Konventionen (vor denen Walther aus seiner katholizistischen Heimatstadt Fulda floh sobald er konnte), für festgefügte soziale Rollenmuster, für institutionalisierte Ordnungen sowohl der Dinge als auch der Menschen, für die Logik fordistischer Produktion und der Arbeitsverhältnisse, die sie stiftet. Heute, in der post-fordistischen, wissensbasierten Dienstleistungsgesellschaft mit ihren geistigen und digitalen Produkten und virtuellen Werten, tun wir uns zumindest theoretisch leichter damit, Kunstwerke nicht bloß mit zur Anschauung gefertigten Gegenständen gleichzusetzen, sondern Ideen, immaterielle Güter, prozessuale Abläufe und die Integration und Partizipation des Publikums durchaus als Werke anzuerkennen. Mitte der Sechziger Jahre musste ein solcher Kunstbegriff aber erst gegen Widerstände sowohl in der Öffentlichkeit als auch in der Fachwelt durchgesetzt werden, denn er rüttelte nicht nur an akademischen Kategorien und den Autoritäten, die sie vertraten, sondern auch an bestehenden Besitzverhältnissen. (Und auch unter heutigen »Avantgarden« und zumal im Mainstream ist es weiterhin eine Herausforderung, die Immaterialität bzw. den sozialen Charakter eines Werkes praktisch anzuerkennen – es gibt weder klare ökonomische Spielregeln noch geregelte institutionelle Umgangsformen dafür. Wäre es anders, hätte man jüngst um Tino Sehgal so viel Aufhebens gemacht? Oder um die »Kommunikativität« der Arbeit Rirkrit Tiravanijas oder Liam Gillicks.)

Franz Erhard Walther begann ab Mitte der 1960er Jahr alte Werkbegriffe umzuschreiben, indem er ihnen performative Konnotationen gab und neue Gebrauchszusammenhänge für ihre Verwendung schuf. In der künstlerischen Praxis wie in der Begriffsarbeit (Walther konzipierte zahlreiche Publikationen formal wie inhaltlich selbst). Walter gab den Werkbegriff nicht auf – er gab ihm neue Wendungen. Er ersetzte ihn durch kein aktionistisches Vokabular und vermied Formeln der »Entgrenzung« von Kunst und Leben. Aber er löste den Werkbegriff vom Objekt. Er entmaterialisierte ihn wie es dann auch die Konzeptkunst tat, ohne ihn jedoch zu intellektualisieren. Er verwendete ihn pragmatisch, setzte ihn in instrumentelle Zusammenhänge. Er konzipierte und beschrieb seine Werke in einem geradezu buchstäblichen Sinn als Mittel, als Vehikel, Instrumente und Werkzeuge (W). Aber er forcierte nicht ihren Prozesscharakter und distanzierte sich von einer Rezeption seiner Werkdemonstrationen als Performances. Walther blieb dicht an der Typographie und der Bildhauerei – interessierte sich für Zwischenräume. Die er aber als Relation zwischen Menschen verstand. Schrift und bildhauerische Skizzen finden sich in den Werkzeichnungen Hand in Hand und verbinden Raum, Tätigkeit und Terminologie.

Heute, wo Walthers Position kanonisiert ist und sich fünf von acht Exemplaren der Edition seines 1. Werksatzes in Museumssammlungen finden, vergisst man bisweilen, was die Zielrichtung dieser künstlerischen und terminologischen Arbeit war: den Kunstbegriff aus seiner Verankerung in einer zutiefst Objekt-zentrierten Tradition zu lösen und ein Praxisverständnis zu etablieren, für das Kunst nicht nur im Sinne der kollektiven Rezeption eine gesellschaftliche Veranstaltung war, sondern auch im Sinne ihrer Produktion. Walther stellte die Instrumente bereit und zeigte, wie sie funktionierten – ihre Verwendung, die den Werkprozess erst immer wieder neu vollendete, lag aber bei den Nutzerinnen und Mitspielern. Walther sah sie als Co-Autoren des

Werkes an. In einem Werkdiagramm von 1966 streicht er den Begriff Künstler und setzt die Produzenten einer Werkerfahrung mit den Benutzern der Werkzeuge gleich, die er bereit stellte. Damit warf er den Ball weit in die Zukunft. Walthers Vorstellung war, die omnipotente Position des Künstlers bei der Bedeutungsproduktion zu streichen und ein »Kunstwerk« als den Akt der Verwendung eines Handlungsangebotes zu betrachten, den ein Publikum vollzieht.

***

Walther schlug vor, Kunst nicht länger unabhängig von ihrer Verwendung durch eine Öffentlichkeit zu denken und dieser Mit-Autorschaft an der Form und Bedeutung der Kunstwerke zuzusprechen, die sie sich privat oder institutionell zu Eigen macht. Die Pointe dieses Vorschlags lag darin, gesellschaftliche Produkte und Projekte jeder Art nicht als Selbstzweck, sondern als Organisationsformen sozialen Gebrauchs zu betrachten. Als Werkzeuge zur Konstruktion sozialer Gemeinschaften, die im besten Fall auf der Erfahrung von Teilhabe und Mitteilbarkeit gründen. Bis heute regt sich größter Widerstand gegen ein solches, »instrumentelles« Kunstverständnis. Gegen »Zwecke« und »Ziele« der Kunst. Als nähmen ihr ausgerechnet diese die Freiheit! Vom generellen Mythencharakter der »Künstlerischen Unabhängigkeit« und von den impliziten Zielsetzungen jedes ästhetischen Aktes einmal ganz abgesehen, werden Instrumente und Werkzeuge in der Regel zwar erfunden, um bestimmten, vorhersehbaren Zwecken zu dienen, bringen aber – einmal erfunden – auch neue Zwecke in die Welt. Dinge, die sich nun plötzlich tun lassen, auf die man zuvor gar nicht gekommen wäre. In Bezug auf die Konstitution eines Gemeinwesens klingt das weniger nach Zweckerfüllung, mehr nach Revolution (Tatsächlich beschrieb Thomas S. Kuhn diesen performativen Charakter im Gebrauch neuer Werkzeuge 1962 in dem Buch »Die Struktur wissenschaftlicher Revolutionen«).

Aber zu welchem Gebrauch taugen nun die Werkstücke des 1. Werksatzes? Zu welchem nicht? Welche Verwendungsformen wären eine Überraschung? Nehmen wir die Elfmeterbahn von 1964. Die weiße, elf Meter lange Textilbahn aus Nylonstoff mit langen Schlaufen an ihren Enden ist in ihrem Lagerzustand aufgerollt. Was mit ihr zu tun ist wissen wir aus einer Werkdemonstration Walthers oder Aufgrund von schriftlichen Handlungsanweisungen, durch erklärende und reflektierende Zeichnungen oder aus inszenierten oder dokumentarischen Fotografien und Filmaufnahmen: Zwei Personen können die elf Meter Textil ausrollen, die Schlaufen um ihren Hals binden und die Bahn zwischen ihre Körper spannen. Ihr Abstand zueinander ist so variabel wie es die Beschaffenheit der Bahn erlaubt. Sie schauen sich dabei vielleicht an und verständigen sich über die Situation. An welchem Ort? In einem Museum? Auf einer leeren Wiese? Im Berliner Hauptbahnhof? Wird gesprochen? Worüber? Wird sich bewegt? Wechseln die Benutzer?

Es gibt mögliche, plausible und kanonisierte Formen der Benutzung der Elfmeterbahn. Es gibt auch alberne, absurde, unvorhergesehene Verwendungen. Fotografien, die lange Zeit unveröffentlicht blieben oder wenig beachtet wurden, zeigen Franz Erhard Walther und verschiedene Co-Autoren selbst in unorthodoxen Gebrauchssituationen, die der idealisierten und kanonisierten Werkdarstellung zuwiderlaufen. Deshalb sind sie nicht »falsch«. Es sind Varianten. Wenn es keine Werkbedeutung gibt, die dem Gebrauch in einer Werkhandlung vorausgeht, dann kann es keine falsche und keine richtige Verwendung geben. Es gibt die Erfahrung mit dem Objekt an einem Ort je aktuell, und sie liegt in der Hand (und in der Verantwortung) der handelnden Akteure.

***

Walthers Werke bleiben notwendig unabgeschlossen. Sie appellieren an unsere Teilnahmefähigkeit, nicht an unsere Ehrerbietung. Sie organisieren sich in der Zeit. Nicht, weil sie ausschließlich im Akt ihrer Verwendung existierten. Das wäre ein Missverständnis. Ihr Hauptzustand ist ihre Lagerform, in der sie die Potenz bewahren, jederzeit in eine Handlung zu führen. Es sind Modelle symbolischer Teilhabe, die sich von Fall zu Fall aktivieren, erfahren und überprüfen lassen. Sie wollen nicht aufgrund ihrer Eigenqualitäten sondern wegen ihrer Mediatorenfunktion geschätzt und bewertet werden. Es sind gar keine ästhetischen Objekte im traditionellen Sinn. Eine Anschauung, die sich in sie versenken will, wird auf die Handlungssituation verwiesen, zu der sie Anlass geben und auf die Erfahrungsdimension, die sie stiften können. Und die ist dann ebenso eine ästhetische wie eine empathische und sozial vollkommen reale Dimension des Handelns, nicht der Kontemplation.

Walther hat 1962/63, unmittelbar vor dem 1. Werksatz, skulpturale Gesten vollzogen – etwa das Auslegen rechteckiger Papierobjekte am Boden oder die Bezeichnung einer geometrischen Form durch im Raum gespannte Fäden – , wie wir sie zeitgleich oder später bei Carl Andre, Donald Judd und Fred Sandback finden, Hauptvertretern des amerikanischen Minimalismus. Aber anders als diese hatte Walther kein Interesse an der Entpersönlichung des Kunstwerkes, an dessen radikaler »Selbstheit«. Nicht das am Boden liegende Objekt interessierte ihn, sondern das Auslegen, Ordnen und Einsammeln, das Flüchtige und Flexible der Situation im Raum, das Werk als Prozess. Während die Fachwelt lange diskutierte, wie sehr die Skulpturen der amerikanischen Minimalisten tatsächlich »bei sich selbst« waren, allein mit ihrer »Objektivität«, oder ob sie nicht vielmehr die Rolle ihrer Selbstheit für die Blicke ihrer Betrachter einnahmen – weshalb George Didi Huberman sie später als »Schauspieler« bezeichnete – ging Walther von Anfang an von einem relationalen Verhältnis von Objekt und Subjekt aus, wobei er der Handlungserfahrung des Subjektes, nicht der Identität des Kunstobjektes Priorität gab.

Das rückt seine Position in unmittelbare Nähe zu der jüngst wieder rezipierten Charlotte Posenenske, die 1969 ihre künstlerische Praxis niederlegte und das Kunstfeld verließ, um ihre Arbeit an partizipatorischen Arbeitsmodellen in der Soziologie fortzusetzen (die sie dafür als besser geeignet betrachtete als die Kunst). Auch Posenenskes formal dem Minimalismus zuzuordnende Skulpturen von 1967/1968 waren weniger für die Anschauung als vielmehr zur Aneignung, zur Verwendung, ja zum Umbauen durch ihr Betrachter/Benutzer entwickelt worden. Walther und Posenenske können für eine politisierbare, gesellschaftlich orientierte Alternative zur amerikanischen Minimal Art stehen, die ja immer wieder für ihren essentialistischen und apolitischen Charakter kritisiert wurde.

Ich schlage vor, Posenenskes und Walthers Ansatz als »Partizipatorischen Minimalismus« zu bezeichnen. Einerseits im Sinne eines antiessentialistischen Minimalismus, dessen Form- und Materialeinsatz soziale Situationen stiftet und im Raum organisiert. Skulpturale Anordnungen, die meist unabgeschlossen bleiben, rücken dabei so in den Aktionsradius von BetrachterInnen, dass deren Teilnahme am Zustandekommen und/ oder an der möglichen Veränderung dieser Anordnungen für das Werkverständnis konstitutiv wird und damit auch die Rezeption der Skulptur als soziales Ereignis bestimmt. Zum anderen im Sinne eines stark formalisierten Partizipationsangebotes, das sich weder an der tatsächlichen »Mitmach-Dimension« vieler Partizipationskunst, noch an der praktischen Organisation von Aktionsgemeinschaften orientiert, sondern vielmehr auf eine grundlegend relationale Werkkonzeption hinaus will. Posenenskes und Walthers Partizipatorischer Minimalismus – der vielleicht nicht zufällig 20 Jahre nach Kriegsende in Deutschland entstand – rechnet mit der Handlungsbereitschaft des Publikums und entwirft typisierte Handlungsmodelle für den individuellen oder kollektiven symbolischen Gebrauch. Die Teilhabe an kultureller Praxis wird dabei letztlich als konkrete Erfahrung der Gestaltung eines demokratischen Gemeinwesens begriffen.

  • FRANZ ERHARD WALTHERS‘ PARTICIPATORIAL MINIMALISM
  • DeutschEnglish

    Text by Alexander Koch

    From 1963 till 1969, Franz Erhard Walther designed the 58 objects of his »1. Workset«, which would become a classic in German postwar art. It fit in the »Bonner Republik«. Hardly 20 years after fascism had ended, there was a longing for new, progressive and unostentatious symbols of understanding and public spirit. Symbols which the »1. Workset« offered. Simultaneously, he found recognition among the international avant-gardes. Already in 1969, his work was exhibited in the Museum of Modern Art and in Szeemann’s Documenta in 1972. Walther’s 1. Workset became one of the artistic emblems for a new democratic German self image, a country open to the world.

    In this respect, Walther’s role bore resemblance to Beuys’s. Beuys, however, belonged to another generation. Based on old, heroic artist images and a profoundly allegoric notion of the oeuvre, the shaman from Düsseldorf positioned himself in the center of his cosmos, fraught with meaning, and called to join him in his visions. Beuys temporarily transformed the Düsseldorf Art Academy into a place of national interest where hundreds of followers would gather. Walther attended the academy from 1962 till 1964, yet oriented himself towards artists like Lucio Fontana, Yves Klein und Piero Manzoni, modern altar robbers of old work liturgies and artist myths. Quite contrary to Beuys, Walther wanted his objects to be meaningless. In themselves, they should not offer anything more than the possibility of an action. Only through the act, the meaning would arise. »Their meaning is their use« is what Wittgenstein wrote about words. That is, language is empty without its practical framework and aims of usage. Words in themselves have no meaning. Walther said the same about artworks and took up, regarding their epistemological status, a decisive anti-essentialist and pragmatic position.

    The objects of the »1. Workset« were not made to be looked at, searching for a deeper meaning which could be found if only we would gaze at them long enough. When the artworks were wrapped up – the state they were mostly in at exhibitions – they gave little ‘meaningful’ away. If there was anything they could contribute to cognition, then it would be merely a result of an experience which they evoked, but not determined. Their epistemic value remained undefined. They were made to be used by an audience. Only then did they ‘make sense’. ‘Using’ them meant, taking one of the 58 Work Pieces – which were conceived by Franz Erhard Walther and manufactured with the help of Johanna Walther – out of their storage packing and carrying them out by the instructions of the artist, i.e. to follow the possible ways of employment that the object suggested and that Walther had sometimes demonstrated. ‘Using’ meant, physically acquiring one of Walther’s objects. Rolling it out, readjusting it, covering up, often together with others. By doing so, one would gradually grasp its practical and symbolic functions and experience them in person. In Walther’s own words: to bring about a »Werksituation« (W), or a Werkprozess« (W), in which a »Werkgedanke« (W) takes place through the act of a »Werkhandlung« (W).

    ***

    Situation, Process, Concept, Action. Those are the key notions of the progressive and societal-oriented art movements of the sixties. A time when many sought to break free from static and conventional art notions, which seemed too far from reality. Deference for a work of art and its creator was a byword for bourgeois conventions (those that made Walther flee his catholic hometown Fulda as soon as he could), for rooted social stereotypes, for institutionalized orders of things and human beings, for the logic of fordistic production and work relations. All which the conventional art notions set forth. In today’s post-fordistic knowledge-based service economy with its mental and digital products and virtual values, we have at least, theoretically, less problems not equating artworks with visual objects, but acknowledging artworks as ideas, immaterial goods, processes, and even the audiences’ integration and participation. In the mid-sixties, such an art notion met with strong opposition both in the public and academic world, since it did not only tamper with academic categories and the authorities that represented these categories , but also with existing possessory relations. (And also among the current ‘avant-gardists’ and notably within the mainstream, it is still a challenge to acknowledge the immateriality, the societal character of a work respectively – there are neither clear economic rules nor habitual institutional ways to go about it. If there were, how would Tino Sehgals oral sales have caused so much fuss? And what would be so specific about the ‘communicability’ of Rikrit Tiravanijas or Liam Gillicks work?)

    Franz Erhard Walther began to rewrite old notions of the artwork from the mid-sixties onwards. He gave them new performative connotations and created new scenarios for its utilization, both in artistic practice as in terminology (Walther conceived the form and content for numerous publications). Walther did not abandon the notion of the work of art; he gave it new twists. He did not replace it by an actionistic vocabulary and avoided formulas of removing bounderies of art and life. But he dissociated the artwork from the object. He dematerialized it like the Conceptual Art would later do, yet without intellectualizing it. He used it pragmatically, placed it in an instrumental context. He drafted and described his works almost in a literal sense as a means, as »vehicles«, »instruments« and »tools« (W). Yet, he did not stress their processual character and distanced himself from the reception of his work demonstrations as being performances. Walther remained close to typography and sculpture – he was interested in the interspace. However, he interpreted this space as relations between people. Writing and sculptural-like sketches come together in his Work Drawings and unite space, activity and terminology.

    Nowadays, Walther’s position is canonized and five out of eight editions of his »1. Workset« have found a place in museum collections. One easily tends to forget the original aim of his artistic and terminological work, namely to disconnect the art notion from its anchorage in a profoundly object-centred tradition and to establish a new understanding of ‘practice’, for which art is a societal event, not only in terms of its collective reception, but also in its production. Walther laid out the instruments and demonstrated how they functioned. But their actual usage that completed the work process every time anew, lied with their users and participants. Walther regarded them as co-authors. In a work diagram of 1966, he crossed out the term artist and put the producer of a work experience on par with the user of the worktools that he had set out. A gesture that reached out far into the future. Walther’s conception was to cross out the omnipotent position of the artist in the production of meaning and to regard an artwork
    as the manifestation of an audience that takes up the offer to act.

    ***

    Walther proposed to no longer think of art as being independent of its employment by a public. He saw the spectators as co-authors of the artworks that they would adopt in form and meaning both in private and in institutional contexts. The point of this proposal was not to consider societal projects or products as objectives in themselves, but as organisational forms of social usage. As tools to construct social communities that, at best, are based on the experience of participation and communicability. To this very day, when using such an instrumental art notion, one encounters stiff opposition. Against purpose and aim of art. As if, of all things, we would rob it from its freedom! Apart from the fact that Artistic Independence is a myth and that every aesthetical act follows implicit aims, it is crucial to see that instruments and tools are, in fact, mostly invented to serve certain, predictable purposes, but that they also engender new purposes, once they have been devised. Suddenly, things can be done that would have been hard to imagine beforehand. With regard to the constitution of a community, this sounds less like attaining an aim, but more like a revolution (Thomas S. Kuhn actually described this performative character of new tools in 1962, in the book »The Structure of Scientific Revolutions«).

    But which forms of usage are the Work Pieces of the »1. Workset« suited for? For which not? What ways of utilization would come as a surprise? Let us consider the Eleven Meter Strap of 1964. That white, eleven meters long nylon textile with long straps at both ends is rolled up in its storage state. What to do with it, we can derive from one of Walther’s work demonstrations or from written instructions, from explanatory and reflective drawings or from documentations in the form of photography and film. Two persons can roll out the eleven meters of textile, bind the straps around their neck and span it between their bodies. The distance between the two is as variable as the nature of the strip allows. Perhaps they look at each other and talk about the situation. What is the appropriate location? A museum? An empty meadow? Berlin central station? Will they talk? About what? Will they move about? Will the users switch?

    There are possible, plausible and canonized ways of using the Eleven Meter Strap. There are also silly, absurd, unanticipated employments. Pictures that remained unpublished or received little attention show Franz Erhard Walther and several co-authors in unorthodox situations that are discordant with the idealized and canonized representation of his work. These are not wrong. They are merely variations. When there is no work denotation that precedes the employment of an art object, then there is no wrong or right way of using it. There is an experience with the object at a specific location at a specific time, which is unprecedented and lies in the hands (and responsibility) of the performing actors.

    ***

    Walther’s works remain inevitably incomplete. They call for our participation, not our deference. They are time-based. Not because their existence lies exclusively in their act of usage. That would be a misunderstanding. Their main stage is their storage form, in which they conserve their potential to be enacted at all times. They are models of symbolic participation which are activated, experienced and verified from case to case. They do not want to be valued or assessed on the basis of their intrinsic qualities, but on their function as mediators. They are not even aesthetical objects in the traditional sense of the word. A perception that seeks to submerge in them will be referred to the acting situation, to which is given opportunity, and to the dimension of experience they can offer. This dimension is then aesthetically, empathically and socially completely real; a dimension of acting, not of contemplating.

    In ’62-’63, promptly before the »First Workset«, Walther had completed sculptural gestures – for instance, the laying out of right-angled paper objects on the floor or the marking of a geometrical shape using tightened threads in the room. Carl Andre, Donald Judd and Fred Sandback, leading figures of the American Minimalism had executed similar gestures at the same or a later point in time. However, unlike them, Walther had no interest in the depersonalization of the artwork, in its radical Selfness. He was not interested in the object lying on the floor, but in the act of spreading out, arranging and collecting, the fleetingness and the flexibility of the situation in the space; the work as a process. While long discussions were taking place in professional circles, to which extent the sculptures of American Minimalists were truly ‘with themselves’, alone in their objectivity, or whether they took up the role of their selfness for the eyes of the viewer – for which reason George Didi-Huberman identified them later as actors – Walther had always departed from a relational rapport between object and subject, where he gave preference to the experience of the subject and not to the identity of the art object.

    This pulls his position very close to the recently well-received Charlotte Posenenske, who laid down her artistic practice in 1969 and abandoned the art field in order to continue working on participatorial working models in Sociology (which she considered being more adequate than the arts). Also Posenenskes sculptures from ’67–‘68, formally classified to Minimalism, were less developed for the observation, and much more for the adoption, usage, even rebuilding by its observer/user. Walther and Posenenske can represent a politicizable, societal-orientated alternative to American Minimal Art, that was criticized time and again for its essentialistic and apolitical character.

    I propose to call Posenenske’s and Walther’s approach Participatorial Minimalism. On the one hand, in terms of an anti-essentialist Minimalism, that uses form and material to create social situations and that organizes them in space. Sculptural arrangements that mostly remain uncompleted, shift into the action radius of the observers, making them participants in the realization and/or possible alteration of these arrangements. This participation becomes constitutive for the work itself and therewith configures the reception of the sculpture as a shared, social activity. On the other hand, in terms of a strongly formalized offer for participation, both artists neither relate to an actual »Experience Dimension« of most participatory art, nor to a practical organisation of action groups, but rather gear towards a fundamentally relational art concept. Posenenske’s and Walther’s Participatory Minimalism – a coincidence that it arose 20 years after the end of war in Germany? – counts on the audience’s willingness to act and designs typified action models for individual and collective symbolic usage. The participation to a cultural practice is ultimately understood as a concrete experience of composing a democratic community.

    Franz Erhard Walthers Partizipatorischer Minimalismus
    Text by Alexander Koch

    Zwischen 1963 bis 1969 entwarf Franz Erhard Walther die 58 Objekte seines 1. Werksatzes, der zu einem Klassiker der deutschen Nachkriegskunst wurde. Er passte in die »Bonner Republik«. Kaum 20 Jahre nach dem Ende des Faschismus war in Deutschland der Wunsch nach neuen, progressiven und zugleich unaufdringlichen Symbolen der Verständigung und des Gemeinsinns groß. Der 1. Werksatz bot sie. Zugleich fand er Anerkennung in den Augen internationaler Avantgarden, vor allem in den USA. Bereits 1969 zeigte ihn das Museum of Modern Art, 1972 Szeemanns Documenta 5. So konnte Walthers 1. Werksatz eine der künstlerischen Insignien für ein neues, ein demokratisches und weltoffenes deutsches Selbstbild werden.

    Darin glich Walthers Rolle der von Beuys. Aber Beuys war eine andere Generation. Der Schamane aus Düsseldorf stellte sich – fußend auf alten, heroischen Künstlerbildern und einem zutiefst allegorischen Werkverständnis – selbst ins Zentrum seines bedeutungsschwangeren Kosmos, auf das man seinen Visionen folgen möge. Beuys machte die Düsseldorfer Kunstakademie, an der er hunderte von Gefolgsleuten versammelte, zeitweilig zum Ort nationalen Interesses. Walther studierte hier von 1962 bis 1964, orientierte sich jedoch an Künstlern wie Lucio Fontana, Yves Klein und Piero Manzoni, modernen Altarräubern alter Werkliturgien und Künstlermythen. Ganz im Gegensatz zu Beuys wollte Walther, dass seine Objekte bedeutungslos seinen. Allein für sich selbst genommen sollten sie nichts bieten, als die Möglichkeit einer Handlung, in der Bedeutung erst entsteht. »Ihre Bedeutung ist ihr Gebrauch. Das schrieb Wittgenstein über die Worte um zu sagen, dass die Sprache ohne den praktischen Rahmen und Zweck ihrer Verwendung leer ist. Nur für sich genommen bedeuten Worte nichts. Walther sagte gleiches über Kunstwerke und nahm damit hinsichtlich ihres epistemologischen Status eine entschieden antiessentialistische und pragmatische Position ein.

    Die Objekte des 1. Werksatzes waren nicht gemacht, um angeschaut zu werden auf der Suche nach einem tieferen Sinn, der sich bei noch genauerem Hinsehen in ihnen finden lassen würde. Zumal wenn sie eingepackt waren wie meist, auch während sie ausgestellt wurden, ließ sich wenig »bedeutsames« an ihnen entdecken. Wenn sie etwas zur Erkenntnis der Menschen beizutragen hatten, dann erst als Folge einer Erfahrung, zu der sie wohl Anlass gaben, die sie aber keineswegs determinierten. Ihr Erkenntniswert blieb offen. Sie waren gemacht, um von einem Publikum benutzt zu werden. Erst dann machten sie Sinn. Sie »benutzen« hieß, die von Franz Erhard Walther konzipierten und unter Mithilfe von Johanna Walther gefertigten 58 Werkstücke (Walther) einzeln ihrem Lagerzustand zu entnehmen und sie gemäß den Vorgaben des Künstlers auszuführen bzw. den Nutzungsmöglichkeiten zu folgen, die in einem Objekt angelegt wurden und die Walther gelegentlich in Werkdemonstrationen (W) mit anderen vorführte. »Benutzen« hieß, sich eines von Walthers Objekten körperlich anzueignen – es zu entrollen, sich anzupassen, sich überzustülpen, meist gemeinsam mit anderen –, seine praktische und seine symbolische Funktion allmählich zu erfassen und am eignen Leib zu erfahren. In Walthers Worten: Eine Werksituation (W) oder einen Werkprozess (W) herzustellen, in der sich ein Werkgedanke (W) in dem Akt einer Werkhandlung (W) vollzieht.

    ***

    Situation, Prozess, Gedanke, Handlung. Das sind Schlüsselbegriffe der progressiven und gesellschaftlich orientierten Kunstbewegungen der 1960er Jahre. Als man loskommen wollte von Kunstbegriffen, die statisch und ohne Bezug zur Wirklichkeit klangen. Ehrfurcht vor einem Werk und seinem Schöpfer stand hier synonym für bürgerliche Konventionen (vor denen Walther aus seiner katholizistischen Heimatstadt Fulda floh sobald er konnte), für festgefügte soziale Rollenmuster, für institutionalisierte Ordnungen sowohl der Dinge als auch der Menschen, für die Logik fordistischer Produktion und der Arbeitsverhältnisse, die sie stiftet. Heute, in der post-fordistischen, wissensbasierten Dienstleistungsgesellschaft mit ihren geistigen und digitalen Produkten und virtuellen Werten, tun wir uns zumindest theoretisch leichter damit, Kunstwerke nicht bloß mit zur Anschauung gefertigten Gegenständen gleichzusetzen, sondern Ideen, immaterielle Güter, prozessuale Abläufe und die Integration und Partizipation des Publikums durchaus als Werke anzuerkennen. Mitte der Sechziger Jahre musste ein solcher Kunstbegriff aber erst gegen Widerstände sowohl in der Öffentlichkeit als auch in der Fachwelt durchgesetzt werden, denn er rüttelte nicht nur an akademischen Kategorien und den Autoritäten, die sie vertraten, sondern auch an bestehenden Besitzverhältnissen. (Und auch unter heutigen »Avantgarden« und zumal im Mainstream ist es weiterhin eine Herausforderung, die Immaterialität bzw. den sozialen Charakter eines Werkes praktisch anzuerkennen – es gibt weder klare ökonomische Spielregeln noch geregelte institutionelle Umgangsformen dafür. Wäre es anders, hätte man jüngst um Tino Sehgal so viel Aufhebens gemacht? Oder um die »Kommunikativität« der Arbeit Rirkrit Tiravanijas oder Liam Gillicks.)

    Franz Erhard Walther begann ab Mitte der 1960er Jahr alte Werkbegriffe umzuschreiben, indem er ihnen performative Konnotationen gab und neue Gebrauchszusammenhänge für ihre Verwendung schuf. In der künstlerischen Praxis wie in der Begriffsarbeit (Walther konzipierte zahlreiche Publikationen formal wie inhaltlich selbst). Walter gab den Werkbegriff nicht auf – er gab ihm neue Wendungen. Er ersetzte ihn durch kein aktionistisches Vokabular und vermied Formeln der »Entgrenzung« von Kunst und Leben. Aber er löste den Werkbegriff vom Objekt. Er entmaterialisierte ihn wie es dann auch die Konzeptkunst tat, ohne ihn jedoch zu intellektualisieren. Er verwendete ihn pragmatisch, setzte ihn in instrumentelle Zusammenhänge. Er konzipierte und beschrieb seine Werke in einem geradezu buchstäblichen Sinn als Mittel, als Vehikel, Instrumente und Werkzeuge (W). Aber er forcierte nicht ihren Prozesscharakter und distanzierte sich von einer Rezeption seiner Werkdemonstrationen als Performances. Walther blieb dicht an der Typographie und der Bildhauerei – interessierte sich für Zwischenräume. Die er aber als Relation zwischen Menschen verstand. Schrift und bildhauerische Skizzen finden sich in den Werkzeichnungen Hand in Hand und verbinden Raum, Tätigkeit und Terminologie.

    Heute, wo Walthers Position kanonisiert ist und sich fünf von acht Exemplaren der Edition seines 1. Werksatzes in Museumssammlungen finden, vergisst man bisweilen, was die Zielrichtung dieser künstlerischen und terminologischen Arbeit war: den Kunstbegriff aus seiner Verankerung in einer zutiefst Objekt-zentrierten Tradition zu lösen und ein Praxisverständnis zu etablieren, für das Kunst nicht nur im Sinne der kollektiven Rezeption eine gesellschaftliche Veranstaltung war, sondern auch im Sinne ihrer Produktion. Walther stellte die Instrumente bereit und zeigte, wie sie funktionierten – ihre Verwendung, die den Werkprozess erst immer wieder neu vollendete, lag aber bei den Nutzerinnen und Mitspielern. Walther sah sie als Co-Autoren des

    Werkes an. In einem Werkdiagramm von 1966 streicht er den Begriff Künstler und setzt die Produzenten einer Werkerfahrung mit den Benutzern der Werkzeuge gleich, die er bereit stellte. Damit warf er den Ball weit in die Zukunft. Walthers Vorstellung war, die omnipotente Position des Künstlers bei der Bedeutungsproduktion zu streichen und ein »Kunstwerk« als den Akt der Verwendung eines Handlungsangebotes zu betrachten, den ein Publikum vollzieht.

    ***

    Walther schlug vor, Kunst nicht länger unabhängig von ihrer Verwendung durch eine Öffentlichkeit zu denken und dieser Mit-Autorschaft an der Form und Bedeutung der Kunstwerke zuzusprechen, die sie sich privat oder institutionell zu Eigen macht. Die Pointe dieses Vorschlags lag darin, gesellschaftliche Produkte und Projekte jeder Art nicht als Selbstzweck, sondern als Organisationsformen sozialen Gebrauchs zu betrachten. Als Werkzeuge zur Konstruktion sozialer Gemeinschaften, die im besten Fall auf der Erfahrung von Teilhabe und Mitteilbarkeit gründen. Bis heute regt sich größter Widerstand gegen ein solches, »instrumentelles« Kunstverständnis. Gegen »Zwecke« und »Ziele« der Kunst. Als nähmen ihr ausgerechnet diese die Freiheit! Vom generellen Mythencharakter der »Künstlerischen Unabhängigkeit« und von den impliziten Zielsetzungen jedes ästhetischen Aktes einmal ganz abgesehen, werden Instrumente und Werkzeuge in der Regel zwar erfunden, um bestimmten, vorhersehbaren Zwecken zu dienen, bringen aber – einmal erfunden – auch neue Zwecke in die Welt. Dinge, die sich nun plötzlich tun lassen, auf die man zuvor gar nicht gekommen wäre. In Bezug auf die Konstitution eines Gemeinwesens klingt das weniger nach Zweckerfüllung, mehr nach Revolution (Tatsächlich beschrieb Thomas S. Kuhn diesen performativen Charakter im Gebrauch neuer Werkzeuge 1962 in dem Buch »Die Struktur wissenschaftlicher Revolutionen«).

    Aber zu welchem Gebrauch taugen nun die Werkstücke des 1. Werksatzes? Zu welchem nicht? Welche Verwendungsformen wären eine Überraschung? Nehmen wir die Elfmeterbahn von 1964. Die weiße, elf Meter lange Textilbahn aus Nylonstoff mit langen Schlaufen an ihren Enden ist in ihrem Lagerzustand aufgerollt. Was mit ihr zu tun ist wissen wir aus einer Werkdemonstration Walthers oder Aufgrund von schriftlichen Handlungsanweisungen, durch erklärende und reflektierende Zeichnungen oder aus inszenierten oder dokumentarischen Fotografien und Filmaufnahmen: Zwei Personen können die elf Meter Textil ausrollen, die Schlaufen um ihren Hals binden und die Bahn zwischen ihre Körper spannen. Ihr Abstand zueinander ist so variabel wie es die Beschaffenheit der Bahn erlaubt. Sie schauen sich dabei vielleicht an und verständigen sich über die Situation. An welchem Ort? In einem Museum? Auf einer leeren Wiese? Im Berliner Hauptbahnhof? Wird gesprochen? Worüber? Wird sich bewegt? Wechseln die Benutzer?

    Es gibt mögliche, plausible und kanonisierte Formen der Benutzung der Elfmeterbahn. Es gibt auch alberne, absurde, unvorhergesehene Verwendungen. Fotografien, die lange Zeit unveröffentlicht blieben oder wenig beachtet wurden, zeigen Franz Erhard Walther und verschiedene Co-Autoren selbst in unorthodoxen Gebrauchssituationen, die der idealisierten und kanonisierten Werkdarstellung zuwiderlaufen. Deshalb sind sie nicht »falsch«. Es sind Varianten. Wenn es keine Werkbedeutung gibt, die dem Gebrauch in einer Werkhandlung vorausgeht, dann kann es keine falsche und keine richtige Verwendung geben. Es gibt die Erfahrung mit dem Objekt an einem Ort je aktuell, und sie liegt in der Hand (und in der Verantwortung) der handelnden Akteure.

    ***

    Walthers Werke bleiben notwendig unabgeschlossen. Sie appellieren an unsere Teilnahmefähigkeit, nicht an unsere Ehrerbietung. Sie organisieren sich in der Zeit. Nicht, weil sie ausschließlich im Akt ihrer Verwendung existierten. Das wäre ein Missverständnis. Ihr Hauptzustand ist ihre Lagerform, in der sie die Potenz bewahren, jederzeit in eine Handlung zu führen. Es sind Modelle symbolischer Teilhabe, die sich von Fall zu Fall aktivieren, erfahren und überprüfen lassen. Sie wollen nicht aufgrund ihrer Eigenqualitäten sondern wegen ihrer Mediatorenfunktion geschätzt und bewertet werden. Es sind gar keine ästhetischen Objekte im traditionellen Sinn. Eine Anschauung, die sich in sie versenken will, wird auf die Handlungssituation verwiesen, zu der sie Anlass geben und auf die Erfahrungsdimension, die sie stiften können. Und die ist dann ebenso eine ästhetische wie eine empathische und sozial vollkommen reale Dimension des Handelns, nicht der Kontemplation.

    Walther hat 1962/63, unmittelbar vor dem 1. Werksatz, skulpturale Gesten vollzogen – etwa das Auslegen rechteckiger Papierobjekte am Boden oder die Bezeichnung einer geometrischen Form durch im Raum gespannte Fäden – , wie wir sie zeitgleich oder später bei Carl Andre, Donald Judd und Fred Sandback finden, Hauptvertretern des amerikanischen Minimalismus. Aber anders als diese hatte Walther kein Interesse an der Entpersönlichung des Kunstwerkes, an dessen radikaler »Selbstheit«. Nicht das am Boden liegende Objekt interessierte ihn, sondern das Auslegen, Ordnen und Einsammeln, das Flüchtige und Flexible der Situation im Raum, das Werk als Prozess. Während die Fachwelt lange diskutierte, wie sehr die Skulpturen der amerikanischen Minimalisten tatsächlich »bei sich selbst« waren, allein mit ihrer »Objektivität«, oder ob sie nicht vielmehr die Rolle ihrer Selbstheit für die Blicke ihrer Betrachter einnahmen – weshalb George Didi Huberman sie später als »Schauspieler« bezeichnete – ging Walther von Anfang an von einem relationalen Verhältnis von Objekt und Subjekt aus, wobei er der Handlungserfahrung des Subjektes, nicht der Identität des Kunstobjektes Priorität gab.

    Das rückt seine Position in unmittelbare Nähe zu der jüngst wieder rezipierten Charlotte Posenenske, die 1969 ihre künstlerische Praxis niederlegte und das Kunstfeld verließ, um ihre Arbeit an partizipatorischen Arbeitsmodellen in der Soziologie fortzusetzen (die sie dafür als besser geeignet betrachtete als die Kunst). Auch Posenenskes formal dem Minimalismus zuzuordnende Skulpturen von 1967/1968 waren weniger für die Anschauung als vielmehr zur Aneignung, zur Verwendung, ja zum Umbauen durch ihr Betrachter/Benutzer entwickelt worden. Walther und Posenenske können für eine politisierbare, gesellschaftlich orientierte Alternative zur amerikanischen Minimal Art stehen, die ja immer wieder für ihren essentialistischen und apolitischen Charakter kritisiert wurde.

    Ich schlage vor, Posenenskes und Walthers Ansatz als »Partizipatorischen Minimalismus« zu bezeichnen. Einerseits im Sinne eines antiessentialistischen Minimalismus, dessen Form- und Materialeinsatz soziale Situationen stiftet und im Raum organisiert. Skulpturale Anordnungen, die meist unabgeschlossen bleiben, rücken dabei so in den Aktionsradius von BetrachterInnen, dass deren Teilnahme am Zustandekommen und/ oder an der möglichen Veränderung dieser Anordnungen für das Werkverständnis konstitutiv wird und damit auch die Rezeption der Skulptur als soziales Ereignis bestimmt. Zum anderen im Sinne eines stark formalisierten Partizipationsangebotes, das sich weder an der tatsächlichen »Mitmach-Dimension« vieler Partizipationskunst, noch an der praktischen Organisation von Aktionsgemeinschaften orientiert, sondern vielmehr auf eine grundlegend relationale Werkkonzeption hinaus will. Posenenskes und Walthers Partizipatorischer Minimalismus – der vielleicht nicht zufällig 20 Jahre nach Kriegsende in Deutschland entstand – rechnet mit der Handlungsbereitschaft des Publikums und entwirft typisierte Handlungsmodelle für den individuellen oder kollektiven symbolischen Gebrauch. Die Teilhabe an kultureller Praxis wird dabei letztlich als konkrete Erfahrung der Gestaltung eines demokratischen Gemeinwesens begriffen.

  • Abstraction in Self-Defense. Santiago Sierra’s cruel solidarity
  • Catfish Instead of Buddha. Michael E. Smith’s Materialism of Basic Needs
  • Option Lots. Eine Recherche von Brandlhuber+
  • dirt that catches the sun. CHRIS MARTIN’S SOcIAL HORIZON Of A sPIRITUAL ABSTRACTION
  • The Coming Takeover For a decoupling of the power to define cultural policy and cultural administration
  • Zehn Schöne Inseln. Die Binnengrenzen des Kunstfeldes. Ein Beschreibungsmodell
  • opting Out of ART. A THEORETICAL FOUNDATION
Close